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INDEX— VOLUME TWENTY-SIX 

SEPTEMBER 18, 1912— SEPTEMBER 10, 1913 



Title No. Page 
A 

•bandoned at Sea 39 8 

absent Voters' Bill, The 43 7 

Vgitator, Become an 47 2 

\gitation, The 4 9 

Maska Fishermen's Union, Death List, 

1912 18 11 

vlaska-Yukon Boundary Survey Com- 
pleted 1 12 

Alcohol Production in Germany 25 9 

"Allies" of Capitalists 47 6 

All-Jap Crew on "Hongkong Maru" 48 7 

Ambergris, Fortune in, found 25 12 

American Federation of Labor — 

Gompers' Report 11 2 

Labor Group in Congress 11 3 

Morrison's Report 11 11 

Exhibit at Panama-Pacific Exposition. 14 1 
Delegate Scharrenberg's Report to S. 

F. Labor Council 14 1 

Formation of A. F. of L 14 8 

Industrial Unionism, Debate and Vote 

on 15 3 

Buck Contempt Case 34 6 

"Begging" Policy, The 45 6 

Two Million Mark, The 47 9 

Americans Leave the Sea, Why (By V. 

A. Olander) 48 8 

America's Future (By Rev. C. Stelzle) . . 6 9 

America's Shipbuilding 40 11 

American Vessels, Oldest 5 9 

Antarctic Explorer Filchncr Returns.... 19 13 

Antvi'erp, Shipping of 34 11 

Arbitration, Compulsory, Etc. — 

Compulsory Arbitration Opposed by 

British Trade-Union Congress 1 4 

No Compulsory Arbitration 18 1 

Gompers on Arbitration 18 7 

Compulsory "Investigation" 22 1 

Sham Patriots 30 6 

Land Without Strikes 33 3 

New Mediation Law 46 3 

New Zealand Arbitration 52 3 

Archbold, Judge, Impeached 20 3 

Arctic Expedition, French 50 15 

Armored Train, The (In West Virginia 

Miners' Strike) 43 3 

Asiatics, Exclusion, Etc. — 

Roosevelt and the Japs 1 7 

Changing the Flag 2 6 

Jap Fishermen at Honolulu 3 8 

Anti-Jap Movement 5 6 

Asiatic, The Temperate 7 6 

Chinese, Two Views of 9 6 

Japanese in Brazil 10 8 

Chinese Exclusion in Congress 11 2 

Japanese Immigration 13 1 

Asiatic Crews 13 6 

Anti-Jap Measures IS 2 

Jap Marriages in San Francisco 20 12 

Alien Land Bill 28-6; 30-6; 34-6 

Alien Land Bill (Governor Johnson's 

Position) 32 6 

Japan. Low Wages in 34 2 

Jap Fishermen in British Columbia... 34 8 

Japanese Ship Tonnage 40 2 

"Cheap Patriotism" 44 6 

Asiatics For the Seas ! 45 6 

China, Piracy in 45 10 

Chinese Entering British Columbia.... 45 13 

Japs Cross Pacific in Sampan 46-5; SO-S 

"Stars and Stripes." The 47 6 

Yellow "Mutinies" ; . . 47 7 

Asiatics on British Ships 47 11 

White Officers Discharged 48 7 

Jap Question, The 50 8 

Japanese Situation, The 51 10 

Yellow Peril, The 52 8 

Boycotting .Asiatics 52 6, 8 

.Asiatics and the Seamen's Bill 52 6 

Atlantic Coast Barges (By V. A. Olan- 
der) 46 11 

.Automobiles in California, Number of... 10 12 



Title No. Page 
Australasian Seamen, Etc. — 

Australian Old-Age Pensions 4 4 

Australian Seamen, Agreement 9 2 

Australian Seamen's Legislation ... 11-6, 8; 12-1 

Australian Navigation Bill (Passed)... 25 6 

New Zealand Seamen and Japs 26 2 

Australasian Seamen's Journal 45 7 

Australian Naval Construction 42 10 

Australian Navigation Act 47 1 

Australia's Labor Government 48 6 

New Zealand "Unity" Congress 51 7 

New Zealand Arbitration 52 3 

B 

Balkan War, Cause of 17 8 

Bakers' Campaign, The 18 10 

Bakers' Label, Demand the 13 2 

Barges, Towing of 24 9 

Barry, James H. (Naval Officer) Sworn 

in 50 5 

Belgian Strike for Manhood Suffrage. .32-6; 33-7 

Beer, World's Production of 3 2 

"Big Business," Pleading For 52 6 

Boat Drill Criticized . . .'. 12 6 

Bolivia, Landholdings in 43 15 

Boycotting Asiatics 52 6, 8 

Boycotting the Boycott 49 8 

Bravery of Louisiana's Engine-room 

Crew 43 14 

British Compensation Act 24 10 

British Dual Union Excoriated 44 7 

British Navy Short of Officers 52 12 

British Seamen Get Raise 22 6 

British Seamen on the Jump 16 1 

British Seamen's Achievements (After 

Twenty-five Years) 22 7 

British Seamen's Insurance..,, 25 6 

British Shipping Statistics 43 9 

British Trade-Union Cojigress 1-4; 2-4; 52-4 

Bristol. Port of 18 2 

Bubonic Plague in Hawaii 3 15 

Bulgaria, Resurrection of 25 11 

Burial of Indigent Seamen (On to 

Cairo!) 42 7 

C 

California's Expenditure for Schools.... IS 12 
California's Laws Held Up by Referen- 
dum 49 12 

California Legislature's Work 36 8 

California Oil for U. S. Navy 2 12 

California Railroad Commission, Juris- 
diction Over Steamers 50 5 

California State Federation of Labor, 

13th Annual Convention S 1-7 

Canada, Cost of Living 39 10 

Canadian Merchant Marine 8 7 

Canal Gates, Preserving 38 10 

Candidates (Political) Questioning of... 7 6 

Capital Punishment 52 2 

Captain "Only" Navigator (on Ship 

"Harold") 48 7 

Carnegie and "El Tuerto" 10 6 

Carnegie Library Accepted by San Fran- 
cisco 9 7 

Cathery, Ned 10 2 

Cement as a Curative 26 7 

"Cement Bill," Defeated 38 1 

Cement Dust, To Prevent 19 7 

Census of Eggs in Cold Storage 4 15 

Chain Making 46 8 

Charity in Germany 33 10 

Chicago Federation of Labor, Report on 

Passenger Boats 20 9 

Cliicago's Subway Plans 2 12 

Chinese — See Asiatics. 

Chronicle Wrong, as Usual 26 7 

Chronometer, Voyage Without 47 5 

City. Problem of the (By Rev. C. 

Stelzle) 8 9 

Civic Federation Discusses Compulsory 

Compensation 13 10 

"Class" in the Navy 52 10 

"Closed Shop" Justified 41 1 

Coal for 5000 Years 35 10 



Title No. Page 
Coast Seamen's Journal — 

Macarthur, Walter, Resigns as Editor 

38,-6,7; 40-7 

Welcome, Editor Scharrenberg 27 6 

Holt, I. M., Elected Business Manager 45 7 

Collisions, To Prevent 5 9 

Commerce of the Pacific 18-9; 35-8 

Commerce (U. S.) Foreign 2 12 

Comparison, An Odious 50 6 

Compass, The Spinning 38 8 

Conspirators, Old and New 43 9 

"Constellation," Frigate, to be Rebuilt. SO 14 

Convict Labor Bill, Help the 18 3 

Corn Crop of U. S 9 15 

Corporal Punishment 24 9 

Cost of Living in Canada 39 10 

Corrugated Ships 39 9 

Court Decisions, Maritime, Labor, Etc. — 

Food Shortage, Award for 6-1; 22-11 

Seamen Awarded Damages 33 1 

"Wreck," What is a 35 11 

Who is a Seaman? 42 8 

Craft Unionism 9 8 

Crowley's Launches, Boycotted 1 6 

Crowley Boycott Lifted 12 2 

D 

Danish Seamen Win Strike 34 11 

Danish Seamen Voters 23 6 

Danish Trade-Union Congress 46 8 

Danish Unemployment 2 4 

"Dead Letter Sale" by U. S 22 12 

Deep-Sea Discoveries 3 9 

"Demented Creatures," About 3 6 

Derelicts, Report on 34 9 

Desertions Decreasing 27 11 

Diesel Engines (The "Sealandia") 28 11 

Dollar, Captain Robert 16-7; 47-6: 50-6 

Don Quixote, A New 42 6 

-Drydocks at San Francisco 30 6 

Dynamite Conspiracy, Indianapolis Trial — 

Trial Commenced at Indianapolis.... 9 12 

Appeal the Case! 16 6 

Gompers States the Case 17 6 

Labor Stands Firm 17 6 

Gompers and the Iron Workers 19 1 

Judge Anderson Rebuked 19 6 

Labor Press on the "Conspiracy" 23 1 

Views of the Daily Press 23 6 

Millionaire .Acquitted (Can You Beat 

It ) 40 9 

E 

Education, Industrial 13 9 

Eggs in Cold Storage, Number of 4 15 

Eight-Hour Day at Sea (in .Australia).. 11 8 

Electoral College, The 7 7 

Electricity in Navigation 44 8 

Electric Ship, The 38 9 

"El Tuerto," Comment, Etc., by — 

The Banshee 2 2 

A Dead One 7 2 

Paternalism vs. Favoritism 24 2 

Franking Graft, The 24 2 

I''ngland, In Darkest 25 2 

Slavery a La Mode 25 2 

Land Question. The Eternal 25-2; 49-2 

Lotteries, Municipal 26 2 

Frankenstein, Our 26 2 

Union Forever, The 27 2 

Minimum Wage 27 7 

Free Speech 27 2 

"Pro Rata" Wages 28 2 

Elastic Justice 28 2 

Progressive (?) Move, Another 31 2 

Our White House Crank 31 2 

Low Wages and Vice 32 2 

Prosperity, .Attenuated 33 2 

Half-Full Dinner Pail 34 2 

Paramount Issue, The 34 2 

Profit vs. Wages 35 2 

Paddy West on the Job 36 2 



w* 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL I XDEX— \OLUME TWENTY-SIX. 



Title 

Charity, Sweet Charity!. 
Student Strike-breakers . 
What's Your Income?... 
Phihppines For Sale. 



No. Page 



37 

38 

39 

41 

Wanted. Field Hands 41 

Pauiterisni Increasing 41 

Our Submerged Fourth 43 

Otisville. In 43 

Capitalism. Doings of 44 

Work and Leisure 45 

Prices Still Going Up 47 

Our Rapid Age 47 

"Schnapps, Cut Out the" 48 

Fines or Jails. Which? 52 

Civilization, Our Bogus 46 

Profits and Degeneration 52 

Engineers on the Uplift 30 

Esperanto 48 

E.xaminer Strike. The 12 



8 
10 

9 
11 
11 

6 
11 
11 

6 
10 

7 



9 
10 
10 
11 
9 
9 



Falkland Island Fisheries 34 9 

Farms in Holland. Xumber of 8 14 

"Fever Ship." The 6-S; 45-10 

Fifty Years for $7.50 46 7 

Firemen. Working Hours of 23 2 

Fisheries, Etc. — 

Honolulu Fisheries 3 

Italian I'isliing Industry 10 

Alaska's Salmon Pack 15 

Alaska Fishermen's Death List (1912) 18 

Whaling Industry. Japanese 19 

Halibut Men, Help the 20 

Steam Trawling in China Seas 27 

Salmon Ladder. Building of 27 

Halil)ut I'ishermen Win 30 

Fisheries. Toll of the 33 

Norwegian Fish Season 34 

Fishermen. To Protect W^hite (in Brit- 
ish Columbia) 34 

Falkland Island Fisheries 34 

French Fishermen's Wages .39 

Trawling in Shantung Waters 40 

Fishing Methods in North Sea 41 

Norwegian Whaling 42 

Canadian Cod Fisheries 44 

Fish Depravity 52 8 

"Fixing" the Scales of Justice (Thaw 
Case) 51 7 

Flag, Changing the 2 6 

Forecastle in "Imperator" (The Same 
Old Story) 45-1; 45-7 

Forecastles. Discussion Before Congres- 
sional Committee 

Foreign-Born Voters 7- 

"Foreigner" .'Kgain. The 

Forests, National in U. S 

Fort Stanton Sanatorium 

France's Depopulation 

Fraud. A Pious (?) 

Freemen? — "Not Yet!" 

Free Ship. Free Men 

Free Tolls. Special Privilege 

I'"rench Merchant Marine 

French Navy, Short of Men 

French Seamen Arbitrate 

French Vital Statistics 

Friendly Tip. A 

Furuseth, Andrew, Articles, Etc., by — 

Legislative Report 1 

Seamen. Need of Skilled 

Seamen's Bill. The 

Seamen's Bill of Rights 

.Argument on Injunction Bill 

Address to R. R. Firemen's Convention 
Future of Sea Service 

G-H 

Geary-Street Line (San Francisco) 

16-6; 42-6; 45-6; 49-7: 51-6 

German .Alcohol Production 25 9 

German Antarctic Explorer Returns.... 19 13 

German Balloon on Oversea Voyage.... 3 14 

Germany, Free Legal Advice in 52 2 

German Labor Agreements, Number of. 1 4 

German Shipping Companies 25 10 

German Wireless Stations in Pacific... 5 13 

Girls in Steel Works 24 3 

Glasgow Ship Mystery 45 10 

Gold, World's Production of 19 12 

Gompers UpheUl by S. l-". Labor Council 18 6 

Grays Harbor. Seamen Shipped at 50 8 

Greenland Crossed I-'irst Time 2 14 

Gulf Stream. Deflection of 46 9 

Happiness a Business .Asset 9 2 

Harriman Lines Strike. Effects of 23 15 

Hawaii. Shipping in 10 8 

Hawaii's Trade Increase 1 9 

Health For Sale 8 8 

Help and Self-Help 11 6 

Helpless and Hopeless 45 11 

Holland, Seamen's Unions in 46 8 

Hookworm Disease 47 8 

Home Rule in Taxation 1 7 

Hongkong, Cable to 51 2 

"Hot Air" vs. Facts 48 2 

Humphrey All By Himself 20 6 

Humphrey Hears From His City 11 7 

Humphrey's Victory (?) 9 6 



24 


8 


11: 


9-15 


15 


7 


4 


15 


1 


6 


8 


2 


14 


6 


? 


7 


34 


6 


27 


7 


40 


10 


7 


13 


1 


6 


16 


9 


15 


6 


-1: 


27-1 


10 


11 


12 


8 


15 


10 


28 


1 


49 


1 


13 


11 



Title No. Page 

"Imperator" on First Voyage 41 4 

Imprisonment for Negligence 3 6 

Income Tax Ratified 24 11 

"Inciting Rebellion" 4 6 

Industrial Accidents — See Workmen's 

Compensation. 

Industrial Education 13 9 

Industrial Relations Commission. 16-3; 19-3; 44-3 

Industrial Training 52 8 

"Industrial Unionism" 6-3; 14-1; 15-3 

"Initiative" in Oregon 27 11 

Injunction, Government By, Etc. — 

Injunction Rules. New 9 6 

Furuseth on the Injunction 28 1 

Urging Injunction Law 32 3 

New Ethics of Courts .38 3 

International Organization 49 6 

International Seamen's Union of America — 

.Secretary Hanson's Report 1 2 

Seamen's Bill Espoused (Speech of 

Jas. D. Post) 3 1 

Liberty on Land and Sea (Speech by 

Halvor Steenerson) 4 1 

Secretary Hanson's Report 6 10 

Freedom for Seamen (By Stoughton 

Cooley) 7 1 

Seamen in .A. F. of L. Convention .... 8 6 

Ships and Men to Man Them 10 1 

Admission. A Significant, Regarding 

Seamen's Bill 10 6 

Seamen's Bill. Final Test on 11 1 

Seamen's Bill in Senate 12 6 

Insult .Added to Injury 15 6 

".Attractions" of Sailor's Life 15 1 

Seamen's Bill in Final Stage 17 1 

Boats!— What .About Men 18 7 

-Argument, A Conclusive 19 6 

Seamen's Bill, Hearings on 

20-1; 21-1; 22-2; 23-2:24-2 

Long .Story Made Short 20 6 

Shipowners "Go .About" Again 21 6 

Seamen's Bill "Not Dead But Sleep- 
ing" 24 1 

Seamen's Bill Passed 25 6 

Furuseth's Legislative Report 27 1 

I'\iruseth and Flynn Report 27 6 

Senate Action on Bill 

27-2; 28-2; 29-2; 30-2; 

Lots of Boats. No Men 29 

Manning Question. The 31 

Convention Call 31 



31 



Immigrants, Warning to 51 

Immigration and Labor (Kahn Cen- 
sured) 24 

Immigration, Frank Morrison on 30 

Immigration to the Pacific Coast .32 

Immigration to U. S. in 1912 4 

Immigrant, the "Peril" of the (By Rev. 

C. Stelzle) 5 



6 

7 

1 

15 



-2 

7 
1 
7 

House Action on Bill 31-11; 32-2 

I. S. U. A. Convention 34 6 

Convention Proceedings 36-1; 37-1 

Photo of Delegates 2J 1 

Work of Convention 37 6 

Delegate Macarthur's Report 37 8 

Seamen's Bill, Press Comment on.... 

39-7; 40-7; 41-7; 43-7 

Seamen's Bill Endorsed by Depart- 
ment Heads 40 1 

Platform Pledges on Seamen's Bill... 42 1 
Safety at Sea (Questions .Asked by 

Secretary of Commerce) 42 7 

Lest We Forget! (Platform Pledges) 46 6 
Seamen's Legislative Struggle (.Ad- 
dress by Andrew Furuseth) 49 1 

Seamen's Bill Championed (By Senator 

La Follettel 52 1 

Int. Transport Workers' Federation.... 49 6 

Italian Seamen's Strike 18 10 

Italy's Exports 7 15 

I. W. W. Tactics 43 2 

J-K 

Jack Tar's Joy-Day 18 9 

Japanese — See Asiatics. 

Jobs for Lazy Men Only 48 8 

Jordan on "War" 12 11 

"Jupiter." Electric Collier. Trial Trip of 51 5 

Kahn, Congressman, Censured 24 6 

Killed by Orders 12 6 

Kirby, John, Jr.. Converted 50 10 

"Knowledge Is Power" 48 1 



Labor and Li(|uor 13 6 

Labor and Commerce (By Wm. B. Wil- 
son) 35 7 

Labor Daj'. Inauguration of 51 1 

Labor Day Reflections 51 1 

Labor Laws. New. 1912 34 8 

Labor (Organized) in New York 50 13 

Labor's Right to Organize 17 2 

Labor Senator. .A (Wm. Hughes) 24 3 

La Follette Champions Seamen's Bill... 52 1 

Lake Department — 

Seamen's Bill. Progress of (By V. A. 

Oiander) 1 8 

Men versus Gold (By V. A. Oiander). 2 8 
Seamen's Bill. Scheme Against (By V. 

.A. Oiander) 2 8 

Who Are These Men? (By V. A. 

Oiander) 3 8 

Lakes Death List 3-8; 8-8; 28-9:47-9 

Hell-Fare Certificate Change 4 8 

Hell-Fare, a Change in (By V. .A. 

Oiander) 6 8 

"Frigging,'' Too Much 6 8 

La'-e Ports. Great 35 9 

Erie Canal, Wonders of 36 11 

"Women and Children First" (By V. 

A. Oiander) 47 8 

"Mutineer." A (By V. A. Oiander)... 47 8 
Excursion Steamers (By V. .A. Oian- 
der) 49 8 

"Lancaster" (Frigate) Out of Service... 4 13 

Legal .Advice, Free in Germany 52 2 

Legal Structure, Our Clumsy 52 10 



Title No. Page 

License, Labor -Against 32 6 

Lawyers, "Exit" The 47 7 

Leap Year, Breaks Record in Marriage 

Licenses 17 12 

Life Buoy, Aerial 46 9 

Life Insurance Payments in U. S. and 

Canada 44 12 

Life on an Ocean Liner (By Geo. L. 

Berry) 43 8 

Light and Power Council Strike (Unjust 

Criticism -Answered) 41 6 

Lighthouse, Second Oldest 24 7 

Lighthouse Service 26 11 

Lighthouses and Birds 35 9 

Lighthouses of Other Days 43 10 

Lifeboats, New Type 39 10 

Lifeboat Rules, British 23 11 

Lifeboats on Dutch Steamers 6 8 

Life-Saving at Sea 26 8 

Lipton's Challenge Accepted 40-4:47-14 

Liverpool Seamen Stand Firm 31 7 

Lloyd's. Registration of Yachts. Etc.... 

14-13; 15-13; 24-4 

Lobbying in Congress, Etc. — • 

Lobbyist. The "Insidious" 40 6 

Law Making by Puppets (Mulhall's 

Confession) 44 1 

Let There Be Light 44 7 

Intimidation or Corruption 44 7 

"-A. F. of L." Begging Policy 45 6 

Can We Unite? 45 8 

Mulhall Expose, The 46 6 

Log Rafts 24 9 

London, Supremacy of 20 2 

London, The Life of 23 7 

London, What It Costs to Run 35 8 

Longshoremen Desert I. W. W SO 2 

Longshoremen (San Francisco) Join In- 
ternational 50 7 

Lumber Exports from New Orleans.... 51 14 

M 
Macarthur, Walter, European Correspondence — 

Glasgow, Let It Flourish 1 11 

British Trade-Union Congress 2 1 

Cardiff and Thereabout 3 7 

Continent, On the 4 7 

British Seamen in Conference 5 2 

Greeting to British Seamen 6 2 

Report to I. S. U. Convention 37 8 

Magdalene. The Heart of 19 9 

Marc Island Ferry (Power of United 

Effort) 41 6 

Marine Exhibits at Panama-Pacific Ex- 
position -. 49 9 

Mates, Three Watches For 28 6 

Merchant Marine, To Restore 10 7 

Mexico, Population of 45 9 

Michigan Copper Strike 48-3; 51-3 

Migratory Workers, The 49 6 

Militarism. Ebbtide of 45 9 

-Militia (U. S.) Strength of 1 12 

Miners' Indictments, The 44 8 

Minimum Wage Legislation — 

Minimum Wage L.iw, .Against 19 6 

Minimum Wage, Sweating System.... 25 1 

Minimum VN'age Error 26 6 

Legislature and Wages 27 6 

"El Tuerto" Views 27 6 

In Defense of Womanhood (-Address 

by Miss Sarah Hagan) '. 29 1 

Minimum Wage in Practice 29 6 

Voices of -Authority 29 7 

Reason vs. Sentiment 35 6 

California's Minimum \\'age Law 41 6 

Minnesota Labor Bureau 12 10 

Mississippi River, Trip in Rowboat 

Down 49 12 

Morgan. Tommy, -A Recollection (By 

Martin Gale) 16 8 

Motors for Sailing Ships 42-8; 45-9 

Mulhall's Confession 44 1 

Municipal Ownership at San Francisco.. 

16-6; 42-6; 45-6; 49-7:51-6 

".Mutinies," Yellow 47 7 



N 

Nationality of Children in Hawaiian 

Schools 45 8 

Naval Statistics. Significant 45 10 

Navigation Report, 1912 21 6 

Navy. "Class" in the 52 10 

Navy's Manning Problem 43 6 

Navy. Recollections of the 16 10 

Navy, Reform in 33 7 

Navy That Is Not Ready, The (By Da- 
vid Starr Jordan) 34 10 

Navy, Younger .Admirals for 39 10 

Negro Progress in I'ifty Years 41 11 

.Negro. What -About the (By Rev. C. 

Stelzle) 3 10 

.Never Give Up 9 8 

"New Industrial Day" (By Wm. C. Red- 
field) 35 1 

New Orleans Lumber Exports 51 14 

New Ships. Old Names 41 11 

New York. Imports at 45 14 

New York. Seamen Shipped at 48 14 

New York State Death Rate 22 15 

Nicaraguan Canal, Construction of 26 4 

"Nipsic" Converted Into Cold Storage 

Plant 44 5 

Nobel Prize, .Award of 11 14 

North German Lloyd Line 34 10 

Norwegian Centennial 33 11 

Norwegian Seamen Meet 7 6 

Norwegian Whaling 42 9 

"Not Married to Her" 15 7 



I 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL I NDEX— VOLUME 



Up 

TWENTY-SIX. 



I G75 M ) 



Title No. Page 
OP 

Object Lesson, Another ("Titanic" vs. 

"State of California") SO 1 

Ocean Currents, Deflecting 46 9 

Ocean Letter, Tlie 9 11 

Ocean to Ocean Railway 35 2 

Ofificers. Discharge "White" 48 7 

Officers' "Guild" and "Union" 23 6 

Oil From the Orient (Steamer "Cowrie") 51 5 

Old-.Age Pensions, Australian 4 4 

"One Big Union," The 45-2; 46-6 

Open-Shoppers Routed SO 7 

Ordered on the Lookout 15 6 

Oregon, Initiative in 27 11 

Oregon, Labor Questions in 28 11 

"Oregonian" Indorses Seamen's Bill.... 10 2 

"Our Ships" and the Canal 23 7 

Oil as Fuel, Use of 16 2 

Ownership of Shore Lands 45 8 

Oyster Farming, Canadian 25 11 

Oyster Production 8 2 

Pacific Coast Steamship Co., Earnings of 9 5 

Pacific Crossed by Sampans 46-5; 50-5 

Pacific Mail Steamship Co., Profits of. . SO S 

Panama. An Agency at 50 7 

Panama Canal Act 1 7 

Panama Canal, Lighting of 48 5 

Panama Canal Rates 10 13 

Panama Canal, Who Conceived the 18 8 

Panama-Pacific Exposition, A. F. of L. 

to E.xhibit 14 1 

Panama-Pacific Exposition (Marine Ex- 
hibits) 49 9 

Panama-Pacific Exposition, Progress of 

45-12; 51-12 

"Patriotism, Cheap" 44 6 

Peace and the Balkans (By David Starr 

Jordan) 15 10 

Pearl Fisheries, Mexican 26 8 

Pearl Harbor Drydock, Controversy over 50 5 

Peonage, War on 27 11 

Permanent Achievements 8 2 

Peru Rubber Workers 4-11; 10-3 

Petroleum in America 3 8 

Pickets and Scabs 18 8 

Piracy in South China 45 10 

Pitcairn Islanders, The 33 10 

Plimsoll's Day, In 34 1 

Plea, A Pathetic 18 6 

Port Townsend Branch of Sailors' Union 

of the Pacific Closed 49 7 

Prtbilof Islands, Supply of Sealskins.... 3 5 

Proportional Representation 19 9 

"Protecting" American Labor 41 10 

Prussia's Parliament 4 10 

Public Drydocks at San Francisco 30 6 

Public Duty to Ex-Presidents 12 7 

"Public Interest" in Slavery 28 6 

Public Opinion, Who Leads 52 7 

Punta Arenas, Shipping at 48 2 

Q-R 

Queries From Bakersfield 49 2 

Questioning Candidates 7 6 

Race, To Improve the 7 8 

Radicalism 51 8 

Radical Wisdom 43 10 

Rats, Fumigation For 43 9 

"Recall" of Senator Owens 48-7; 50-7 

Record Passages — 

.Antwerp to San Francisco 52 S 

Dawson to White Horse 10 5 

Grays Harbor to San Francisco 18 5 

New York to Georgetown 33 4 

Portland to San Francisco 33 5 

Porto Rico to Mobile 20 4 

Santa Rosalia to Columbia River 11 5 

Savannah to Havana 38 4 

Record Lumber Cargo ("Algra") 48 5 

Record Iron Ore Discharging ("Chis- 

wick") 29 4 

Record Submarine Submergence 1-5; 41-5 

Referendum on California Laws 49 12 

Right to Quit, The 3 6 

"Rowan" Target for Pacific Fleet 8 5 

Russian Seamen's Journal 36 6 

Russian Seamen Organizing 39 2 

Russian Serfdom Ended 26 10 

S 

Sabotage 1 9 

Safety to Life at Sea 33 6 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific — 

Delegates' Reports (California State 

Federation of Labor) 5 7 

Labor Day Trophy, Received 6 6 

T. S. U. of A. Delegates Elected 7 7 

Delegates' Report (Washington State 

Federation of Labor) 21 2 

.'\mendment to Increase Dues 23 7 

Sixth of March Program 24 6 

Rally on the Sixth 25 6 

Anniversary (Twenty-eighth) 26 1 

Cement Bill, History of 38 1 

Macarthur, Walter. Resigns 38-6. 7; 40-7 

Cutting of the Melon, The 39 6 

Prosperity, Evidence of 40 6 

Eating in the Cabin ! 42 6 

Port Townsend Branch Closed 49 7 

Jortall. "Chris," Death of SO 6 

Panama, Agency Proposed at SO 7 

DECEASED MEMBERS. 

Andersen, Isaac 46 7 

Anderson, August 44 7 

Anderson, Charles 11 7 

Anderson, Gustav 13 7 

Anderson, John A 12 7 



Title 
Anderson, Robert E. . . 
Armstrong, Thomas L. 
Absalonsen, Ole M 



No. 

10 

19 

24 

Asplun, Aug 43 

Baardsen, John 14 

Bernhard, Christian 30 

Bjorck, Algot Julius Larsen IS 

Boyle, John 19 

Brox, Harry 46 

Carlson, John Wesley 47 

Carlsen, Olaf 8 

Carlssen, Carl Adolph 14 

Dick, Robert 27 

Eager, John 14 

Fisher, Jacob Julius Christopher.... 12 

Foulkes, Dennis 12 

Forn, F. A. C 43 

Forsman, Victor 29 

Fred, John 26 

French, Jack A 36 

Gjosund, Severin Andreas 18 

Grohnert, Fred 51 

Gudmundsen, Martin Tobias 9 

Gunnarson, George 11 

Gustafson, Gustav W 7 

Hammond. John Ashter 21 

Hansen, Fred 41 

Hedlund, Arvid 52 

Henriksen, Henrik 18 

Hillman, Fred 2 

Horan, Patrick 48 

Ingalls, Joseph Watson 7 

Isacson, Carl Isak 6 

Jacobs, George 39 

Jacobsen, Anton 40 

Jacobsen, Axel 14 

Jensen, C 40 

Johannessen, Elias Cornelius 22 

Johannesen, George 12 

Johansen, Charles 13 

Johanson, Emil 52 

Johnson, Carl Frederick 16 

Johnson, Johannes 21 

Jorgensen, Jorgen 22 

Jortall, Chris. Sophus SO 

Kragis, Melkis 18 

Karlson, Fredrick 16 

Kelly, James 26 

Klausson, Axel Sigfrid 42 

Knudson, Mathias 2 

Korthal, August 18 

Koski, Victor 39 

Kusik, George 22 

Kurton, Ivar Bjorn 34 

Lane. Fredrick 16 

Lanning, Samuel Lajerik 3 

Larsen, Nels P 12 

Larsen, Thomas 18 

Lavvson, Niels 51 

Leonard, Charles H 16 

Martin, Isack 44 

Mazzini, Lorenz 51 

Moller, Nils 20 

Monaghan, James 13 

Monsen. Frank 6 

Murphy, Charles 15 

Nester, Wilson C 7 

Nielsen, Axel Johannes 14 

Nilsen, Martin 11 

Odland, Burg 48 

O'Keefe, Jerry 2 

Olsen, Sacharias 34 

Olsen, Peder Kristian 18 

Olsen, Peter 6 

Petersen, Torstein Julius Zahl 13 

Rastad, H jalmar Oscar 18 

Rohde, Robert 6 

Swift, Michael 38 

Schulz, .August Carl 2 

Tonder, Hans 19 

Tesch, Wilhelm 3 

Thomasen, Knut S 39 

Thomassen, Christian Bernhard 30 

Vahey, Patrick 44 

Verdonk. John 6 

Veyoda, Frank 47 

Wiig, Chris 24 

Wilson, Sanford 39 

Sailing Vessels, U. S. Tonnage 46 

Sailing Without Chronometer 47 

Salvage 42 

Salvage Claimed by Steamer "Hyades". SO 

Sampans Cross Pacific 46-S; 

San Francisco^ 

Carnegie Library Accepted 9 

Carnegie and Chronicle 11 

Victory for the People (Geary Street 

Municipal Railway) 16 

Labor Council Set Right (in re Gom- 

pers) 18 

Imports and Exports for 1912 26 

Drydocks, Public 30 

Municipal Ownership 42 

Women in Trade-Unions 45 

People's Gold Mine, A 45 

Vote for Public Ownership 49 

Marine Exhibits at P. -P. Exposition., 49 
Longshoremen Affiliate with Interna- 
tional SO 

People's Victory, The 51 

Scabs and Pickets 18 

School Children (in Hawaii), National- 
ity of 45 

Scott, Robert F. (Great Explorer — 

Greater Man!) 24-11; 25-2,6,9; 

Sea-Elephant, Hunt for 45-5; 

Sealskins from Pribilof Islands 3 

"The Seaman" (Organ of British Sea- 
men), Welcome 8 

Seamen and Citizenship 22 

Seamen and Self-Help 13 

Seamen for Canada 29 

Seamen (Russian) Organizing 39 



Page 
7 
7 

7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
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7 
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7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
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7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
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7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
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7 
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7 
7 
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50-5 

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5 
6 
6 
1 
6 
7 
9 

7 
6 
8 

8 

38-9 

47-5 

5 

7 
6 
8 
6 
2 



Title No. Page 

Seamen Shipped at Grays Harbor 50 8 

Seamen Shipped at New York 48 14 

Seamen's and Firemen's Wages (in Aus- 
tralia) 12 1 

Seamen's Bill of Rights (By Andrew 

Furuseth) 15 10 

Seamen's Heirs Wanted 10 10 

Seamen's Union in Europe 9 1 

Seamen's Unions in Holland 46 8 

Seamen's Work in Europe 30 1 

Sea Cows, Captain Barnacle's 26 9 

Sea's Mysteries, The (By Capt. E. K. 

Roden) 5 10 

Sea Tragedies, To Prevent 33 8 

Sea Training 11 10 

Sea Trolley, A 42 10 

Seaweeds, Utilizing 25 10 

"Selandia," The (Diesel Engines) 28 11 

Servants of Plutocracy 5 6 

Shady Deal Uncovered 42 2 

Shanghaiing, Shippingmaster found Guil- 
ty of 44 7 

Shelter for Shipwrecked on Vancouver 

Island 12 5 

Sherman Anti-Trust Law — 

Liability of Unionists 8 1 

Sherman Anti-Trust Law 8 1 

Sundry Civil Bill Vetoed 29 3 

To Protect Labor 36 9 

Trade-Unions are not "Trusts" 37 6 

Miners' Indictments, The 44 8 

Decision, An Erudite 35 8 

Labor Prosecution Must Cease (Sun- 
dry Civil Bill Amended) 37 3 

Big Business Frenzied 38 10 

Epoch Maker, An 40 9 

Sundry Civil Bill Signed 43 11 

"Class Legislation" 45 7 

Privilege and Sherman Law 51 9 

Shipbuilders' Prophecy 45 9 

Shipbuilding at Hongkong 48 8 

Shipbuilding, Increase in Price of 15 5 

Shipbuilding in U. S 19 4 

Shipbuilding in Venezuela 3 10 

Shipbuilding on the Tyne 34 8 

Ship Decoration 42 8 

Shipowner and Seaman 19 7 

Shipowner, A Sane 26 9 

Ships' Davit, New 39 9 

Ships of the Future 40 11 

Sight Tests. .. . 51 9 

Silver Production in U. S 18 12 

Slave Trade in South America 36 2 

Social Evil, The 15 9 

Social Justice vs. Cement Dust 38 1 

Socialist Backhander, A 24 6 

Society Islands, Commerce of 52 9 

Spanish Americans, The (By Rev. C. 

Stelzle) 7 9 

Speed at Sea 19 8 

Speed Limits for Boats 38 2 

Spider, A Fishing 39 11 

Spies in Unions 3 8 

Spitzbergen's Development 12 8 

"Stars and Stripes," The 47 6 

"State of California" vs. "Titanic" 50 1 

Steam, Supremacy of 8 7 

Steamboating, Early 45 8 

Steamers for Panama 38 10 

Steamfitters. Jumping the 13 7 

Stranger Than Fiction 9 10 

Strange Talk in U. S. Senate (W. Va. 

Miners' Strike) 39 1 

Strike Breaking in Germany 39 2 

Striking for Human Safety 49 2 

Submarine Bell, The 40 11 

Subsidizing a Monopoly 49 8 

Suez Canal, The 10 8 

Suicides at Sea 49 10 

Suicides in 1911 3 9 

Survival of the Fit 48 8 

Swimming, Learn 6 6 

T 

Tariff and Wages 4 6 

Tax on Land in Bolivia 43 15 

Tax Paid on Whisky, etc 50 12 

"Terra Nova'' (Scott's ship) sold 44 14 

"The Commodore" Bobs Up 10 9 

Theories Shattered, Old 50 9 

Thirty Per Cent. Dividends 41 11 

"Three Mates" Law Enforced 51 7 

Three Watches on Deck (in Australia). 11 6 

Tipping System, The 2 6 

"Titanic," Loss of — 

"Titanic," What of the 8 6 

"Titanic" Liabilities 8 9 

"Titanic" Engineers, The 26 11 

"Titanic" Anniversary, The 31 6 

"Titanic," Truth About The SO 1 

Tobacco, Use of 14 11 

Toilers of the Sea 33 2 

Tow-Barge Again, The 11 6 

Trachoma 40 2 

Trade-Union Benefits 46 1 

Trade-Union Congress (British) .. 1-4; 2-4; 52-4 

Trade-Union, Oldest 11 3 

Trade Unionism, Results of 45 1 

Trade-Unions Offer Rich Reward 47 11 

Trade-Unions, Power of IS 8 

Trade-Unions, Their Aims and -Achieve- 
ments 8 10 

Tragedy of the Sea, A 47 6 

Tiansport Workers' Growth 8 6 

Trautmann's Confessions 46 2 

Treasure Island in Atlantic 10 9 

Tree-Planting in Norway 50 9 

Truth About The "Titanic" SO 1 

Tuberculosis Sanatorium (Fort Stanton) 1 6 

Turbines, Geared 40 10 

Typhoid Germ Distributor 6-5; 45-10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME TWENTY-SIX. 



TiUe 



No. Page 



U-V 



Undermanning 16 9 

Unemployment in Denmark 2 4 

Uniform State Laws, Conference on.... 50 12 

Union Label Essay Contest 2 6 

Union Label Misunderstood. 24 7 

United States Army Appropriation 24 12 

United States Bonds, Interest on 3 IS 

United States Corn Crop 9 15 

United States Customs Districts Consoli- 
dated 44 12 

United States Fleet of Sailing Vessels.. 46 9 

United States Foreign Commerce 2 12 

United States Immigration in 1912 4 15 

United States Merchant Marine 46-9, 10 

United States Militia, Strength of 1 12 

United States National Forests 4 IS 

United States Pension Bill 26 12 

United States Production of Silver 18 12 

United States Public Health Service, 

Cost of 25 12 

Unity, International 13 7 

University Extension 48 1 

"Valencia" Disaster, Report on 23 10 

Vancouver Island, Shelter for Ship- 
wrecked 12 5 

Vandcrbiit Ball, The 19 10 

Voters, Foreign-Born 7-11; 9-15 

W-Y 

Wages and Competition (By Stoughton 

Cooley 42 1 

Wages, Case For High 35 10 

Wage Theory, A New 39 11 

Wages Well Earned 14 6 

Wanted — More Freaks ! 43 6 

War, The Cost of 16-8; 41-2 

Warships, Ancient 8 8 

West Virginia Coal Miners Win 31 3 

West Virginia Probe 40 3 

Whaling Station for Trinidad 20 5 

Wilson, Hon. Wm. B., Portrait of 

1-1; 26-6; 28-3 

Wireless Law Amended 1 10 

Wireless Operators Licensed 34 2 

Wireless Operators Strike. 28-6; 33-7; 39-6; 42-11 

Wireless Strike Not An Emergency.... 35 6 

Wireless to Falkland Islands 40 10 

"Wisconsin Idea." The 48 1 

Wish Fathers the Thought 16 7 

Woman's Life Work 17 9 

Woman Suffrage, Progress of 42 11 

Women and Children (By Rev. C. 

Stelzle) 9 9 

Women in Trade-Unions in San Fran- 
cisco 45 1 

Women Workers in Germany 38 2 

Women Workers of World 50 8 



TiUe No. Page 

Women Voters in United States 1 12 

Wonders of the Sea 25 11 

Workmen's Compensation, Etc. — 

Industrial Accidents in Washington.. 5 4 
Compensation Act for Panama Canal 

Zone 5 12 

Compulsory Compensation Discussed 

by Civic Federation 13 10 

Oregon Compensation Commission... 18 3 

Industrial Accidents 19 2 

British Compensation Act 24 10 

Seamen's Insurance, British 25 6 

Compensation in California 31 6 

Seamen's Compensation Act 34 7 

Compensation for Seamen 36 6 

Insurance of British Seamen 37 11 

Seamen's Accident Insurance 39 6 

Workmen's Compensation (By Will J. 

French) 50 9 

World Growing Better 42 2 

World Wireless Progress 15 11 

Worlds, About Other 48 10 

World's Tonnage, Increase in 24 4 

Words from the Sea 43 10 

Would-Be (I. W. W.) Martyrs 44 2 

Wrecks — 

Admiral Dewey 12 13 

.A.dvent 24 5 

Agda 20 13 

Advent 24 S 

Albion 28 S 

Aldine 17 4 

Americana 45 S 

Andrew Johnson 10 13 

Barge 87 15 13 

B. B. Hardwick 25 4 

Bermudian 21 4 

Bessie C. Beach 15 13 

Bombay 18 14 

Borealis 24 S 

Calcium 48 5 

California 20 13 

Candar 11 5 

Carrie Winslow 19 4 

Casco 43 5 

Cecilia 10 13 

Charles Nelson 33 5 

Charmer 17 5 

Christiana 24 13 

City of Georgetown 26 4 

Commodore 13 13 

Curacao 41-5; 42-5 

Dora 14-5: 17-5 

E. K. Wood 12-5 7 

El Dorado 20 4 

Empress of China 52 5 

Eldorado 51 5 

Endeavor 1-5; 2-5; 7-5; 12-5 



Title No. Page 

Ethyl B. Sumner IS 13 

Evelyn 19 4 

Florence 16 13 

Florence E. Getsan 23 4 

Future 22 4 

Glace Bay 42 4 

Glenmark 52 13 

Granada 22 4 

Gualala 6-5 ; 7-S 

H. J. Corcoran 23 5 

J. J. Loggie 6-5; 7-5; 8-5 

J. H. Lunsmann 44-5; 46-5 

John D. Spreckels 30 5 

John Maxwell 9 13 

Josephine SO 14 

Julia Luckenbach 19 4 

Kambyses 5 5 

Klickitat 11 5 

Len White 19 4 

Lillebonne 2 5 

Lugano 27 4 

Lyman D. Foster 45 5 

Mai 48 14 

Mary A. Whalen 26 4 

Mary Barry 30 4 

M. F. Plant, see "Yukon" 

Mimi 23 S 

Minnie Pearl 17 4 

Mirene 22 S 

Mount Oswald 47 6 

Myra Sears 10 13 

Newport 10-5; 14-5 

Nidge IS 5 

Oceania Vance 12-5, 7; 16-5 

Osprey 8 S 

Panganie 21 13 

Paul Palmer 41-4; 51-2 

Point Arena 48 5 

Regal 23 4 

River Meander 14 13 

Rosalia d'Ali 51 14 

Rowena 24 4 

Riverside 41 5 

R. L. Tay 1 13 

Rosecrans 18 5 

Seminole 23 13 

Samoa 21 5 

State of California 50-1, 5 

Tasmania 17 4 

Thomas S. Dennison 20 4 

Torrisdale 18-5: 20-S 

Tripolitani 18 13 

Turrialba 17 4 

Urd 52 14 

Veronese 20 13 

William A. Grozier 46 14 

William Nottingham 46 5 

Workman 20-5; 24-S 

Yukon 40-5; 47-5 

Zaccheus Sherman 26 4 

Yachts Registered by Lloyd's 14 13 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXVI, No. 1. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1912. 



Whole No. 2191. 



FURUSETH'S REPORT. 



To the Membership of the International Sea- 
men's Union of America: 

Comrades — It is with deep regret that I make 
this report. We all hoped, and I expected, that 
by this time our bill would be law. I expected 
to see it passed before the month of May, and 
much of this report will be devoted to explain- 
ing why this did not come to pass. 

The difficulty began with our convention, 
where our Atlantic Comrades submitted a minor- 
ity report opposing the bill. They were 
opposed to the language test, the stand- 
ard of efficiency and what they pleased 
to call "the reintroduction of imprison- 
ment." This matter has been fully 
explained in the columns of the Journal. 
Briefly, it amounted to an amendment 
of existing law so that men could not 
be prosecuted for mutiny, when it was 
a simple case of disobeying lawful com- 
mands at sea. A lesser penalty was 
provided; but they could not or would 
not see the real fact. 

We appeared before the Committee 
on Merchant Marine and Fisheries on 
December 14; but they (our Atlantic 
Comrades) were not with us. They ap- 
peared later, namely in the month of 
January, and then they took the same 
position that was occupied by the ship- 
owners of the Atlantic and the Lakes. 
While this was not sufficient to defeat 
us, it did delay us, and this, along with 
other causes, which I shall mention 
later, finally resulted in the bill being 
laid over by the Senate Committee. 

The second difficulty was that the 
member who in previous Congresses 
had been the father of our bill had been 
defeated in the previous election. He 
would, if re-elected, have continued his 
advocacy of the bill and since he would 
have been the chairman of the commit- 
tee this meant very much indeed, since 
the majority of the committee, with but 
three exceptions, were new members on 
the committee. This naturally caused 
some delay because they wanted to be 
tlioroughly acquainted with the condi- 
tions, which would cause a bill such as 
this to be necessary. 

The bill was introduced by Hon. Wil- 
liam B. Wilson, of Pennsylvania, who 
had been made a member of the Com- 
mittee on Merchant Marine and Fisli- 
cries and who is also chairman of the 
Committee on Labor. William B. Wil- 
son of Pennsylvania is a rare man. A 
man with a sympathy deep enough, a 
vision wide enough, and constructive 
statesmanship great enough to make it 
possible for him, a landsman, to see and 
feel the wrongs of the men of the 
sea as well as men on shore. 

Previous to being elected a member of Con- 
gress he had been a miner and Secretary-Treas- 
urer of the United Mine Workers of America. 
He worked for our bill in a way as few men 
could have done. His industry and patience are 
vvonderful and it is to be hoped that the 
citizenship of his district may return him 
again to a scat in the House, which is 



honored and highly benefited by his presence. 
When the hearings were closed the bill was 
referred to a sub-committee of which Hon. Rufus 
Hardy was chairman. Again we were excep- 
tionally fortunate. Mr. Hardy is a man whose 
heart and mind is open to the burden-bearers. 
He is a lawyer and has served his people as a 
judge before he came to Congress. Let the 
seamen of this country and of the world learn 
his name, and to keep him in mind as a man who 




Path 



HON. WM. B. WILSON, of Pennsylvania, 
;r of the Seamen's Bill in the House of Representatives 



can see no reason at all why seamen should not 
be treated with all the consideration due to men. 
Clear-sighted, sympathetic and keen, he would, 
during the hearings, ask questions which laid 
bare the full and real meaning of the opposition. 
The chairman of the committee, Hon. Joshua 
W. Alexander, of Missouri, is a lawyer; he was 
a judge for many years before being elected to 



Congress; he is painstaking, cautious and withal 
sympathetic. Having taken a position, he does 
not change. Altogether we were exceptionally 
fortunate in the personnel of the committee. Of 
course, there were others who opposed the bill 
for reasons best known to themselves. Mr. 
Humphrey, of Washington, and Mr. Greene, of 
Massachusetts, were opposed to our bill and did 
all in their power to defeat us both in the com- 
mittee and on the floor of the House. Let their 
names be remembered as men in whose 
opinion the seaman has no rights and 
should have none, except such as the 
shipowner may choose to grant. 

The bill was reported to the House 
on May 2 and it passed the House on 
August 2. During the consideration of 
the bill in the House it was opposed by 
Mr. McMorran, of Michigan, and Mr. 
Howland, of Ohio. Both of these gen- 
tlemen's position seemed to be that the 
bill ought not to apply to the Lakes. 

The real opposition was to the stand- 
ard of individual efficiency, the language 
test and the provision of two able sea- 
men or men of a higher rating for each 
lifeboat on passenger vessels. 

When the bill was reported to the 
Senate it went at once to the Com- 
mittee on Commerce, of which Senator 
Nelson, of Minnesota, is chairman. He 
appointed Senators Burton of Ohio, 
Crawford of South Dakota, Martin of 
Virginia and Fletcher of Florida as a 
sub-committee to . consider and report 
upon the bill, requesting them at the 
same time to report back as early as 
possible. At this stage protests poured 
in from the shipowners of every section 
of the country; they insisted that thov 
be heard before the bill be reported 
back to the Senate. Because of this 
position, together with the fact that 
Senator Burton had to go away on ac- 
count of his health, the bill was laid 
over to the next session as renorted in 
the following colloquy in the Senate on 
.•\ngust 19; 

Mr. LA FOLLETTF.: T wish to 
make an inquiry about the bill (H. R. 
23673) to abolish the involuntarv servi- 
tude imposed upon seamen in the mer- 
chant marine of the United States while 
in foreign ports and the involuntary 
servitude imposed upon the seamen of 
the merchant marine of foreign coun- 
tries while in ports of the United States, 
to prevent unskilled manning' of Ameri- 
can vessels, to encourage the training 
of boys in the American merchant ma- 
rine, for the further protection of life 
at sea, and to amend the laws relative 
to seamen, which came to the Senate 
from the House, having passed the 
House, and was referred to the Com- 
mittee on Commerce. 

That bill has been- struggling to get throutrh 
Congress for 18 years, and I want, from the 
chairman of the Committee on Commerce or 
some other member of that committee, to ascer- 
t:.in whether there is any prospect of this bill 
receiving early consideration. 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



SECRETARY HANSON'S REPORT. 



Chicago, 111., August 31, 1912. 
Officers and Members, International Sea- 
men's Union of America : 
Comrades — I respectfully submit the fol- 
lowing general report to accompany my 
financial statement for the month ending 
August 31. 1912: 

Financial. 
Referring you to my last general report, 
issued in connection with financial state- 
ment of the quarter ending June 29. 1912, 
I can advise you that practically all debts 
mentioned therein have been paid. 

Previous to my taking office as Secre- 
tary-Treasurer it was the practice to issue 
the International quarterly financial reports 
one month after the quarterly statements 
issued by the district unions. This was 
on account of the provision in the Interna- 
tional Constitution, Art. IX, Sec. 3, which 
states: "The fiscal year shall date from 
November 1st to October 31st." While 
complying with the Constitution in refer- 
ence to the yearly report necessary at the 
end of the fiscal year, the quarterly reports 
will hereafter be issued according to the 
division of the regular calendar year, when 
similar statements are being issued by the 
district unions. This procedure is made 
necessary by the fact that my local bonds 
as Treasurer of the Lake Seamen's Union 
require a joint audit. The International 
quarterly financial report will be subjected 
to audit by the local quarterly finance com- 
mittee. This, I believe, will be more satis- 
factory than the old method. 

I have applied for and obtained bond, in 
• favor of the International Union, from the 
National Surety Company. This is the 
same concern with which I am under 
bonds as Treasurer of the Lake Seamen's 
Union. The bond is dated from the time I 
took office, and runs perpetually, subject to 
no other formality than the proper pay- 
ment of yearly premiums. 
Legislation. 
Under the management of President Fu- 
ruseth, acting as the legislative representa- 
tive of the International, with the assis- 
tance of the district unions and such aid as 
this office could render, we succeeded in 
getting the Seamen's bill passed by the 
House of Representatives and brought be- 
fore the Senate. Detailed reports on this 
subject have been submitted by President 
Furuseth, and there is no need of going 
into this matter at any length. I am con- 
vinced, however, that we would have been 
successful in getting it through the Senate 
before adjournment if a part of the Atlan- 
tic District had not seen fit to oppose our 
efforts in this direction. It is extremely 
unfortunate that such differences have oc- 
curred in our own ranks, because the op- 
position of the shipowners from the Atlan- 
tic, the Pacific and the Great Lakes was 
unceasingly persistent and became desper- 
ate to the extent that the bill met with 
success. 

During the campaign of the past few 
months in behalf of the bill, the Interna- 
tional office did its best to assist in the 
work, and in this respect I believe I am 
justified in saying that this office had ma- 
terially increased its usefulness. 

Since the bill was reported out of com- 
mittee in May, we have sent out over 
10,000 letters and as many circulars, to 



organizations and individuals in various 
parts of the country, for the purpose of 
securing support for the bill. Approxi- 
mately 900 newspapers were communicated 
with and furnished material on this sub- 
ject. This is exclusive of labor papers. 
This kind of campaigning, while not at all 
expensive, entails an immense amount of 
labor, but with the able assistance of the 
local office force we managed to carry it 
on. Relieving that the membership at large 
desires us to do our be.'^t in this respect, 
Vice-President Olander and myself will 
continue this work unceasingly, in con- 
junction with President Furuseth, until 
Congress again meets in December. The 
experience gained during the last few 
months will be an aid to us in the work 
now before us. 

W'e will soon enter a new era, every- 
thing seems to indicate success, our status 
will soon reach a new and higher level, 
if we will but do the work necessary to 
keep our case before the public during 
the ne.xt three months. I urge upon every 
district union to leave nothing undone in 
the effort to secure support for our bill. 
This office will do its share. 
Atlantic District. 

Information from the Atlantic is that a 
part of the district has been engaged in a 
short strike involving the sailors and the 
firemen. The membership, according to 
my information, responded to the strike 
call in a most creditable manner, some 
successes were met with, but in the main 
the immediate result of the strike was not 
encouraging. It seems that the much- 
talked-of "National Transport Workers' 
Federation of America," in which it ap- 
pears the Atlantic District, for awhile, 
placed much confidence, proved of little 
use on account of lack of organization 
and differences which developed therein. 
Strikes ought never to be called without 
full consent of the membership by refer- 
endum ballot vote in the district affected. 

Information has been received that the 
Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders' 
Union of the Atlantic has withdrawn from 
the International. The secretary, Mr. Vi- 
dal, has declined to give any answer to 
questions on that subject, but published 
statements in the official paper issued by 
his organization verify the report, and 
it should be thoroughly understood that 
that organization has severed its connec- 
tion with the International Seamen's Union 
of America. 

Internal differences have arisen among 
the Atlantic Firemen, and according to let- 
ters received here there is a large number 
of members among the English-speaking 
class who desire to retain membership in 
the International Union, and who desire to 
apply for a charter for that purpose. It 
is to be hoped that the Atlantic Firemen 
will find some way to remedy the present 
state of affairs. 

The Atlantic Coast Seamen's L^nion has 
sent in a notice, through its secretary, that 
its name has been changed to "Sailors' 
Union of the Atlantic," and it has request- 
ed that it be given new charters showing 
the new name. It is evident that its con- 
stitution has been changed, but of this I 
have no official knowledge as to details. 

Pacific District. 
. The Pacific District unions are in a very 
healthy and flourishing condition, accord- 
ing to reports received. The unions there 



are working together harmoniously. They 
gave very material assistance in the ef- 
forts to secure the passage of the Seamen's 
Bill, and doubtless will continue their good 
work in this respect. The reports issued 
by the unions in this district are so com- 
plete and regular that I can add nothing 
to the information they convey. 
Lake District. 

The I^ake District unions are now carry- 
ing on the organizing work practically on 
their own resources. Constant agitation 
on the part of the officers and members 
of the district unions, through personal 
work and through bulletins and circulars, 
is beginning to have some effect on the 
non-union men who are now feeling the 
claws of the notorious "Hellfare" scheme. 
This is shown by letters and inquiries re- 
ceived here from men on the ships. The 
officers of the Lake Carriers' ships, who 
all through the strike received extra pay 
for acting as wheelsmen, are now getting 
uneasy. They, too, are feeling the effect 
of the "Hellfare" plan, and there is some 
intimation that their wages will "fluctuate." 

The fact that the attorney for the Lake 
Carriers' Association has announced that 
he will bring "seamen" and "firemen" to 
Washington to testify against the Seamen's 
Bill will be made known among the non- 
union men by means of circulars which we 
will begin to distribute next week. This 
will undoubtedly cause some awakening 
amongst them, and may arouse ip them a 
sense of what they must do to protect 
their own interests. Of course, the only 
way they can protect themselves is to join 
the Union. 

Charters. 

Application for charter has been received 
from the Bay and River Steamboat Asso- 
ciation of the Chesapeake Bay and tribu- 
taries, Mr. R. E. Hall, Secretary-Treasurer, 
Baltimore, Md. The application is now 
under consideration. I am advised that an 
organization known as the Marine Cooks 
and Stewards' Association of Newfound- 
land is also considering affiliation with this 
International Union. 

Conclusion. 

I wish to urge upon the district unions 
to be prompt as possible with their reports 
and with their obligations to the Interna- 
tional, in order that this office may be of 
the greatest possible use to them. 

In reference to minutes and reports from 
district unions, some are being sent to the 
secretary of the L. S. U., some to myself 
and others to both. Since the local and 
International offices here are combined, I 
suggest that all such minutes and reports 
be addressed to the International office, in 
order thai the International files may be 
complete. I can then furnish them to the 
local meetings and members when desired. 
Fraternally and respectfully yours, 
T. A. Hanson, 
Secretarv-Treasurer. 



The U. S. Hydrographic Office at New- 
York has installed on the floor of the 
Maritime Exchange a specially prepared 
chart 96.x64 inches of the North Atlantic 
Ocean, showing the dangers to navigation. 
The map shows the routes taken by trans- 
atlantic steamers, and the presence of ice- 
bergs, field ice, derelicts, wrecks and buoys 
are noted. Just as soon as the office is 
notified of any menace to navigation the 
data is marked on the chart. 



I 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Recommend Eight Hours. 

Tlie report of the special commission 
appointed by the International Association 
for Labor Legislation to inquire into the 
subject of "hours of labor in continuous 
industries" has been made public only re- 
cently. In 1910, at a delegate meeting 
in Lugano, it was declared that the twelve- 
hour day customary in continuous indus- 
tries was injurious to health, and the ap- 
pointment of the commission resulted. The 
commission has held meetings with nine 
European countries and the United States 
represented. The general conference of tjie 
association will be held this month in 
Zurich, and the commission's report will be 
undoubtedly acted upon favorably. The 
commissioners express the opinion that the 
eight-hour shift in continuous industries 
(industries working night and day), is the 
best shift system for such work, and they 
strongly recommend it, both from the 
point of view of the physical and moral 
welfare of the workers, and in the social 
and economic interests of society generally. 
They consider that in iron and steel indus- 
tries the eight-hour day is very neces- 
sary and is practicable, and they urge that 
the various governments should be asked 
to arrange a conference of the interested 
States, with a view to arriving at an inter- 
national agreement as to the introduction 
of the eight-hour day in these industries. 
The commissioners also report that in the 
United Kingdom there has been of late 
years a marked tendency toward the eight- 
hour system in the iron and steel trade, 
in some important sections of which it has 
been successfully introduced. It is also 
asserted that experience of the working of 
the dififerent processes, where the eight- 
hour day has been introduced, all goes to 
show that there are, as a rule, no serious 
technical difficulties to be encountered 
when changing from the twelve to the 
eight-hour shift. In such special cases, 
where it is necessary or very desirable for 
the same man to work continuously for a 
longer spell (as in some work in glass 
factories), the commission is of the opinion 
that a maximum week should be estab- 
lished. 



Use the School Houses. 

John R. Commons, a member of the 
Wisconsin Industrial Commission, has an 
interesting article in the current issue of 
La FoUette's Magazine, under the caption, 
"School Houses as Employment Offices." 
Mr. Commons contends that the ideal or- 
ganization for securing employment for the 
unemployed would be national in its scope, 
so that oversupply anywhere could be 
shifted to meet the demands elsewhere. 
He says that as it is impossible to get 
national action at once. State action should 
be begun. The factors entering into what 
is termed the "ideal labor market of a 
State" are enumerated as follows : Free 
employment offices maintained by the State ; 
free employment offices maintained by local 
committees ; private agencies regulated by 
the State ; correspondents in various cities 
and industries; reports from all to a cen- 
tral clearing house ; periodical bulletins of 



the labor market. In speaking of the 
school as a branch of the employment 
bureau, Mr. Commons says: "If each 
schoolhouse has a director of its social 
center service, he could be supplied with 
blanks from the main employment office. 
A workman, by going to the school nearest 
his house to register could be immediately 
connected with the whole organized labor 
market of the State." Then follows a dis- 
cussion of bringing men into connection 
with the character of work they are quali- 
fied to perform, the reports from the vari- 
ous sections of the State being relied upon 
to do this service. The article concludes : 
"How to induce school teachers and prin- 
cipals to co-operate in this great agency 
is a matter that can be worked out when 
once its importance is understood. . . . 
With a broadening idea of the school as a 
social center and the employment of prin- 
cipals who are wide awake and alive to 
their social opportunities, the Industrial 
Commission could enlist them as a part 
of a comprehensive scheme for the State." 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD, 



Manufacturers Busy. 
The National Manufacturers' Association 
has sent out circulars pointing out the 
fact that the Democratic House of Repre- 
sentatives passed a number of measures in 
the interest of labor, and also points to 
the labor planks in the Democratic plat- 
form. In fact, the National Manufacturers' 
Association, in substance, advises its sup- 
porters to throw their support against any 
party that gives labor any recognition. 
This was to be expected, but it is doubtful 
whether the association will be able to 
wield any substantial influence with the 
various progressive issues commanding the 
center of the stage. The passage of the 
injunction limitation bill by the House, 
as well as the contempt bill, had the efifect 
of putting a magnificent dent in the Manu- 
facturers' Association when the vote by 
which these two bills passed is considered. 



Parcels Post Preparation. 

The officials of the Postoffice Depart- 
ment are getting in readiness to put into 
general operation the parcels post system 
on January 1 next, which is authorized in 
the postoffice appropriation bill. The par- 
cels post business will not only cover in 
its ramifications all systems of transporta- 
tion now utilized by private express com- 
panies, but will be extended also to more 
than a million miles of rural delivery and 
star route service. Aside from the com- 
mittee comprising members of the Senate 
and House, the Postoffice Department has 
also appointed a number of chiefs of de- 
partments to assist the committee in work- 
ing out the plans. The law admits to tlie 
mails practically all farm and garden as 
well as factory products, provided such 
articles do not weigh more than eleven 
pounds or exceed seventy-two inches in 
combined length and girth. The mode of 
packing will be carefully prescribed. The 
present equipment of the mail service, it is 
stated, is not adapted to the carriage of 
such merchandise, and therefore new 
(Continued on Page 11.) 



International Seamen's Union of America, 570 
West Lake St., Chicago, III. 

. ,_ Atlantic District. ^ 

Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union, 51 South St., 
New York, N. Y. 

Maritime Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Atlantic and Gulf, 28 South St.. New York. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
Atlantic, 42 South St., New York. 

Inland Seamen's Union, Whitehall, New York. 

Harbor Boatmen's Union, 214 West St New 
York, N. Y. 

Lake District. 

Lake Seamen's Union, 570 West Lake St. 
Chicago, III. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Great Lakes, 71 Main St., Bufifalo, N. Y. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Union of Great 
Lakes, 55 Main St., Bufifalo, N. Y. 
Pacific District. 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 44-46 East St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
the Pacific, 91 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of the 
Pacific, 51 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Alaska Fishermen's Union, 93 Steuart St San 
Francisco, Cal. ' 

United Fishermen of Pacific, Box 42, Seattle 
Wash. ' 

Bay and River Steamboatmen's Union 51 
Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia- 
29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 
1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 
Queens Chambers, Wellington, N Z 
Palmerston Bklg., Auckland, N. Z 
Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 
Maritime BIdg,, Melbourne, Victoria 
Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 
25 Arcade, Brisbane, Queensland. 
Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 
Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 
Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland 
Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Road, London, E . 
Lngland. 

Hull Seamen's and Firemen's Union, 1 Rail- 
way St., Hull. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, Dubois- 
straat 12, Antwerp, Belgium. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin P. O. 16, Germany. 

FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts Maritimes de France, Marseille, 11 Place 
de la Joliette. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Quay Videcog, Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Sjomands Forbund, 15 Rosenberg gar- 
den, Bergen, Norway. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Kobenhavn, Toldbod- 
gade 15, Denmark. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, Kobenhavn, St. An- 
napalads 22, Denmark. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 

ITALY. 

I'^edcrazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Tiazza L. Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 

AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Boschetto 5, Austria. 

SPAIN. 

Federacion Nacional de Obereros de Mar de 
Buques v puerto, Barcelona Mayor, 44, 2, 1 
(Barceloneta), Spain. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad de Resistencia de Foguistas, Monte- 
video, Calle 25 de Agosto No. 219, Uruguay. 

ARGENTINA. 
Federacion Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's Workers. 



Compulsory arbitnitioii of trade 
disputes was again strongly opposed 
hy British trade unionists, who at 
the Trades Union Congress, held at 
Newport on September 5, cast an 
overwhelming vote against the prin- 
ciple. Nearly 2,000,000 members of 
trades unions arc represented. Two 
American labor representatives, Geo. 
L. Berry and J. H. Walker, delivered 
addresses. 

The Bishop of Oxford (Right Rev. 
Dr. Gore) declares that wages will 
no longer settle themselves by the 
law of supply and demand. The 
proper basis for the reconstruction 
of society, he says, is the principle 
that the adequate payment of labor 
should be the first charge upon in- 
dustry, and a permanent standard 
wage would doubtless entail a stand- 
ard of efficiency in the worker. 

The number of labor agreements 
reported as being in force in Ger- 
many on January 1, 1910, was 6,667, 
relating to 138,785 establishments and 
to 1,139,974 workpeople, while on 
December 31 there were 8,293 agree- 
ments, covering \7iJ27 establish- 
ments and 1,361,086 workpeople. Be- 
tween these dates 3,240 agreements 
had lapsed and 4,866 had come into 
force. 

The total immigration to Canada 
for the months of April and May, 
1912, was 129,453 as compared with 
113,110 for April and May, 1911, 
the increase being 14 per cent. Of 
the total arrivals for the two 
months, 89,858 were at ocean ports 
as against 81,344 during the corre- 
sponding month of last year. There 
was also an increase in the num- 
ber of arrivals from the United 
States, the totals for the period in 
question being 39,605 in 1912 and 
31,767 in 1911. Immigration con- 
tinued on a heavy scale during July. 

Seventy-eight labor disputes were 
reported to the French Labor De- 
partment as having begun in June, 
as compared with 97 in the previous 
month and 158 in June, 1911. In 73 
of the new disputes 12,795 work- 
people took part, as compared with 
11,654 who took part in 93 disputes 
in the previous month and 18,125 in 
140 disputes in June, 1911. The 
groups of trades in which the great- 
est number of disputes occurred were 
building (18 disputes), textile (15), 
metal (15), and transport (12). Of 
100 new and old disputes reported 
to have terminated 19 ended wholly 
in favor of the workpeople and 48 
wholly in favor of the employers, 
while 3Z were compromised. 

Returns received from certain se- 
lected ports in Great Britain (at 
which 83 per cent, of the total ton- 
nage in the foreign trade is entered 
and cleared) show that during July 
54,178 seamen, of whom 5,219 (or 
9.6 per cent.) were foreigners, were 
shipped on foreign-going vessels. 
Compared with July, 1911, there was 
a net increase of 4,659 in the total 
number shipped. At Cardiff there 
was a large increase; there were 
also increases at the Tyne ports, 
Southampton and Gla5gow. During 
the seven months ended July, 1912, 
the total number of seamen shipped 
was 301,886, a decrease of 1.640 on 
the total for the corresponding 
period of 1911. There was a marked 
increase at Southampton. At Car- 
diff, Glasgow and the Tyne ports 
there were decreases. Lascars are 
not included in the figures. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Cannon's Clothing Store 

Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

Special Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

Men's Suits Made to Order 
515 FRONT-516 BEACON STS. .... SAN PEDRO 



M. BROWIN 

THE SAN FRANCISCO CLOTHING STORE AND OUTFITTER 

EXCLUSIVE AGENT FOR 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

437 PROINT STREET SAIN PEDRO 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Angeles Beers 
All goods sold at lowest San Francisco prices. 'We buy direct from Kentucky 
Distilleries and our California Wineries. Seafaring men invited to Inspect our stock. 
Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

SEAFARINGnJlE?r*0?r'THIS^^ OUT THAT 

S. G. SWANSON 

641 SOUTH BEACON STREET 

Next door to postoffice. Los Angeles "waterfront," 

SAN PEDRO. CALIFORNIA 

Is the man to see when in line for High-Class 

Union Label TAILORING to order only 

SATISFIED CUSTOMERS IS OUR BEST ADVERTISEMENT 




•G/8TEW 



UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 

When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiflF, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and oflfers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 



him. Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



WILL BE A MOTHER TO YOU 
Fix your clothes, sew the rips, re- 
pair the tears, fasten the buttons, etc. 
We really clean your clothes by our 

French Dry Cleaning Process 

which is entirely different from the 

mere "sponging and pressing" method. 

We Call and Deliver 

The French Dye WorKs 

612 BEACON STREET 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Martin Olsen, height 6 feet, weight 
225 pounds, missing since Christmas, 
is inquired for by Riggers' and 
Stevedores' Union, Steuart and Fol- 
som streets, San Francisco. 

John Moen, born 1878 in Norway, 
height 6 feet, is inquired for by his 
father, John Olson Moen, of Lansing, 
Iowa. 

When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal 



San Pedro News Co. 

Sixth and Beacon Streets, San Pedro, Cal. 

Dealers In 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Agents 

Harbor Steam Laundry . 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



The United States Shipping Com- 
missioner at Philadelphia, Pa., re- 
quests the following named seamen to 
communicate with him: Gust Leyrle, 
arrived at Philadelphia, October 2, 
1908, on ship Dirigo; Gustav Mattson 
and Victor Wilson, on schooner 
Charles Davenport, March, 1911. 

George Albert Vaughan, aged 47, 
of Handsworth, Birmingham, Eng- 
land. Was in New York city in 1902; 
worked as steward on New York and 
South American boats. Important. 
Address, Rev. R. C. Cookson, 96 
Monroe street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Herman Bjorckbom Eknas, a na- 
tive of Finland, born 1874, is inquired 
for by his orother Evert. Address, 
Sailors' Union, San Francisco. 



VOLUME XXIV 

OF THE 

COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 

Bound in Cloth and Thoroughly Indexed 



FOR SALE TO MARITIME UNIONS AT 
$2.00 PER VOLUME (Expressage Extra) 

Also a limited number of Volumes XVII to XXIII. 
Address: Business Manager, 44-46 East Street, San Francisco. 
California. 



San Pedro Letter List. 

Antrosen, Karla Mattson, J. -1388 

Amnell, Albert Markwardt, Carl 
Anderson, E. -1762 Murphy, Ambrose 
Anderson, Otto -1738Matlsen, Hendrik 

Anderson, Gust Marx, Thorwakl 

Andersen, Peder Mellerup, Jens 

Alver, G. Matsen Hemming A. 

Alro, Oscar Nordstrom, J. 

Anderson, A. Nordman, John D. 
Anderson, C. -907 Nvhagen. J. -770 

Andersen, Ben. Nilsson, Eduard 

Andersen, Charles Nllsen, Hans. H. 

Anderson, J. -1099 Nilsen, Anders 

Anderson, C. G. Nelsen, C. J. 

-1420 Nelsson. E. -522 

Bredesen, John Nessenberg, F. 

Berg, H. Y. Nutman, Harry 

Bedford, A. Nielsen, P. VT. 

Bjerk, Gus Neuling. Albert 

Bulander, B. B. Osterberg. Car) 

Brander, W. Olsen, Wm. 

Behrens, E. A. Olsson. Hans 794 

Bergman. E. Olssen. H. -714 

Bloom, Frank A. Olsen. Martin 
Bodahl, Hans .1746 Ouchterlonv. F. 

Berggren. O. -1889 Olsen, O. P. -1141 

Boardsen, S. Owen, Fred 

Bentsen. Hans Olsen. George 

Boardsen. Ed. Osferhahn. J. W. 

Broders, Hajo Peterson, K. E. -903 

Buchtman, F. Peron. Edmund 

Conners, Jack Petterson, Viggo 
Clausen, J. .1322 

Carlsson, A. -1220 Pettersen. Erick 

ChrLstensen, H. P. Peterson. Henry 

Erikson. Oskar Peterson, Olof (Reg. 
Edgerton. Jack Lr ) 

Eichel, ErIck Pedersen. Peder 

Ellingsen. Eduard Potet. Emile 

Edwards. Walter Peterson, P. -386 

Erickson, Edward Peterson, J. 

Fasholz. D. Petersen! Oscar 

Freeling, Chas. Peterson, Loul 

Faulconer, Bert Pedersen, Julius 

Glasse. Gust. Retal, F. O. 

Geiger. Joseph Rantman, R. 

Gotz. Rudolf Risbeck. Gustav 

Gustafson, J. Reuter. Chas. 

Gouda. C. Roy, George -1715 

GroszewskI, Fritz Repson, E. 

Hansen. N. -989 Raamussen, Rasmus 

Hjort. Knud Remerd. J. 

Hansen. C. -1910 Rouvie. MIkko 

Ilelinius, Oscar Rutter, Fritz 

Hannus. Alex Swensen. C. E. 

Halto. Walne Sbonke. Frank 

Heyne, Herman Sundholm, Frans 

Hoft. Hans Stammeriohan. Hans 

ITakonsen, John Schmit, Chas. 

Hansen. Berger Samuelsen. WIctor 

Hendenskog. John Selversen. Chas. 

Irbp, Andrew Stangland, Peter 

Ingebretsen. Ingolf Sorensen. J. 

.Tones, Auber B. Sandstrom, O. H. 
Jones. Harry -1810 

Jones. Arthur Simpson, I>. C. 

Jersh. Billy Schulze. Max 

Johnson, Johny Selklng. Ben 

.Johansson. Nils L. Schramm. Arthur 

Johnsen. Gunnar Sellers. W. 

.Tohansen, John Schafer. Ernest 

Jensen. J, Frank Signard. Walter 

.Johnson. Arthur Schmld. .John .2579 

Johanssen, Fritz Schmld, P. 

Johnson, Oscar Stenberg. Alfred 

Johnsen, Walter Schmidt, L,. -2492 

Johnsen. Nels Sassl. W^llhelm 
Johnssen, C. -2016 Swanson. Rueben 

Johanssen, Knut Scott, Ed. 

Hj. Sorensen. Michael 

Jacobsen. John Sandstrom. Ivar 

Kern, Max Thorn, Arvld 

Kimcral, Herman ToUefsen. R. 

Kllman. Gunnar Togersen. Peder H. 

Karlson. R. Torbjornsen. Andrew 

Kuhne, W. Thompsen, Anton 

Kerleau, Alex Tamlsar. Peter 

Kaphluhn. Franz Thomgren. Chas. G. 
Kosze, Franz (Reg.Thorsen, J. 

I'.) Thomsen. Alex 

T.,arsson. John Togersen, Anton 

JJndroth, Gust Tougel. R. 

liaurltsen. George TItby, Carl 

I-ynd. A. Wlkstrom, W. (Reg. 
I-undmark, Helge Lr.) 

T.arson. Martin -171-OWIkstrom. William 

T..ewis. George H. W^eber. W. 

T.,ewls, Fred Wilson, Harry 

J>indeman. Otto Wilemson. Hans 

T.alne, Axel V. Werner. E. 

J-arsen, Martin W^ard. H. 
J.udviksen, A, -1249 Zoe. Francois 

Lange. Ingolf de Zoming, Arthur 

T.ang, Charles Zlckman, A. -2021 

LJungberg, Herman Younggren. E. 

Mark. Frank Packages and Photos 

Mikkelsen, Peter Haggar. Robert 

Markman. H. Mlklleit, E. 

Maurhada. Henry .Johnson, Olle -2210 

Mayors. Paul M. Schroeder, Ernst 
McGuIre, Owen T. 



YOU NEED NOT BE BROKE 
WHEN IN SAN PEDRO 

I buy and sell new and second- 
hand goods that have any value. 

I also do Gun and Locksmithing, 
Upholstering and Mattress Making. 

N. MANN 

335 BEACON STREET, San Pedro 

Near 4th Street 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Emanuel Nyreen. a native of Abo, 
Finland, was member of crew of 
revenue-cutter Dexter, in 1908. Please 
communicate H. H. Rohrbach, New- 
ton Theological Institute, New Cen- 
ter, Mass. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



With cargoes of canned salmon that fill 
tlie holds to the hatch covers, salmon packets 
continue to arrive at San Francisco from the 
northern canneries. 

Christen Jespersen has been appointed master 
of the schooner Ruby, vice C. F. Anderson; N. 
E. Stuart of the barkentine William G. Irwin, 
vice F. G. O. Baumgarten, and W. H. StofTel of 
the steamer Pride of the River, vice John 
Stephenson. 

The commercial wharf which has been under 
construction at Port Watsonville since April 
4th, has been completed at a cost of more than 
$100,000. It is one of the largest on the Pacific 
Coast, extending into Monterey Bay over 1700 
feet. It was built by the Watsonville Naviga- 
tion and Railroad Company, of which F. E. 
Snowden is president, while the San Francisco 
Bridge and Construction Company did the actual 
work. 

The well known schooner Endeavor, owned 
by George E. Billings of San Francisco, is a 
total loss near Suva, according to advices re- 
ceived by the marine department of the Cham- 
ber of Commerce. Assistance has been sent 
to the vessel, but it is not believed that the 
craft can be saved. The Endeavor was bound 
from British Columbia for Suva with a cargo of 
lumber and had almost reached her desination 
when the disaster occurred. 

Several owners of sealing vessels at Van- 
couver, B. C, have announced their intention 
of applying for licenses to hunt fur seals in the 
next winter. They say that a single year of 
cessation from slaughter in Bering Sea has 
already restored the herds in large part, and 
that the water off the California coast should 
be swarming with the seals next winter. Li- 
censes were refused by the Canadian Govern- 
ment last year and it is thought there will be 
another refusal now. 

During the month of August sixty-eight ves- 
sels loaded at the mills in the lower Columbia 
River district and their combined cargoes 
amounted to 30,491,000 feet of lumber. Thirty- 
three of the vessels with 21,000,000 feet of lum- 
ber sailed for domestic ports, while five vessels, 
carrying 9,491,000 feet of lumber, sailed for 
foreign ports. In addition to these cargoes 
one raft containing 5,000.000 feet of logs, and 
one raft containing 8,000,000 feet of piling were 
towed to California. 

The Hammond Lumber Companv's steamer 
Necanicum, building at the Bcndixsen ship 
yards at Eureka, will be launched September 
2Sth, according to present plans, and after 
being taken to San Francisco for the installa- 
tion of machinery will be placed in commission 
about November 1st. So far arrangements for 
the launching have not been made in detail. The 
Necanicum will carry 850,000 feet of lumber 
and will be engaged in trips to San Francisco 
from Astoria and Eureka. 

The Inland Navigation Company of Seattle 
has awarded a contract to the Seattle Con- 
struction & Dry Dock Company for the build- 
ing of a new steamer for the Seattle-Tacoma 
run that will be the fastest passenger steamer 
on Puget Sound and will cost $250,000. She 
will be 225 feet long, 34 feet beam, equipped 
with a four-cylinder engine and water-tube 
boilers. She will have a carrying capacity of 
1500 tons, and with a speed of 20 knots is 
expected to make the run between those cities 
in an hour and 15 minutes. 

R. G. Lockwood has been appointed master 
of the steamer Herald, vice Ivar Plomgren; 
James W. Cleghorn of the steamer Panama, vice 
Root Powell; L. J. Badaracco of the steamer 
Manila, vice Charles Moebus; Ernst Stelter of 
the schooner Dora, vice Henry Woldt; J. A. 
Lundstedt of the steamer Saginaw, vice P. M. 
Kofifold. The steamer Oriole, William H. Thorn- 
ley agent; the steamer Norwood, C. A. Knud- 
sen master; the bark Hec'.a, Ed. Nelson master; 
the steamer Four Sisters, D. L. Larkin master, 
and the steamer Tallac, Louis Hansen master, 
have been enrolled for the coasting trade. 

That the passenger travel between San Fran- 
cisco and Honolulu is reaching proportions that 
the present fleet of steamers is hardly able to 
take care of is the statement of the officials 
of the companies in the business. The new 
boats promised by the Pacific Mail Company 
and the one ordered by the Matson Navigation 
Company are expected to solve the problem of 
increased travel from the Golden Gate to the 
islands. In addition to carrying capacity pass- 
enger lists both ways, the steamers are handling 
more freight than has moved between this 
port and Honolulu in a long time. 

Although under control, fire still burns in the 
sulphur cargo of the British freighter Fitz- 
clarence, at San Francisco. The hatch covers 
were still heated and continual streams of 
water were played on the decks to keep them 
cool while carbonic gas was pumped into Nos. 
1 and 2 holds to smother the blaze. Pumps 
have been placed on board and will be started 
for the purpose of clearing the engine-room 
and hold of water. When the fire is ex- 
tinguished a large repair job will confront the 



steamship interests. The loss is expected to 
amount to many thousands of dollars. 

The bark Nuuanu, well known in many sea 
ports, has again changed hands, and while only 
private terms are announced as usual, the specu- 
lators are said to have cleaned up a nice sum. 
Shortly after her arrival at Honolulu recently, 
following a tempestuous voyage from New 
York, during which she was compelled to put 
into Fort Stanley for repairs, the Nuuanu was 
purchased by Captain John Barneson, who had 
figured as the central operator in many sales. 
Now it is reported that Barneson has sold the 
Nuuanu to the firm of J. B. Castle & Co. of 
Honolulu. The Nuuanu is booked to proceed 
to Hilo to load railway ties for San Diego. 

The Bates & Chesebrough steamer Pleiades, 
which went ashore at Point San Lazaro on 
August 16th, and which was floated September 
8th by aid of the wrecking steamer Greenwood 
under command of Captain A. F. Pillsbury, ar- 
rived at San Francisco under her own steam 
on September 15. The salvage operators, to- 
gether with Captain Armstrong and the crew 
of the stranded steamer, used fine judgment in 
the work which resulted in the steamer being 
floated. It was not necessary to jettison any 
of the merchandise cargo ,and only 650,000 feet 
of lumber and shingles were sent overboard in 
order to lighten the steamer. The operations 
were materially aided by wireless, this being the 
means of communication between the wreck and 
the salvage steamer Greenwood and with the 
land stations. 

Plans have been completed by the Treasury 
Department for the construction of the four 
revenue cutters authorized in the closing hours 
of Congress. The commissioning of these new 
vessels, at a total cost of $925,000, will mark 
the passage from view of three veteran craft. 
They are the Woodbury, the oldest vessel flying 
the Government flag, forty-seven years in ser- 
vice; a $225,000 cutter will take the Wood- 
bury's place in patrolling the Maine coast. The 
Manhattan, thirty-eight years of age, the an- 
chorage patrol boat in New York Harbor. Its 
successor will be a $100,000 tug. The Winona, 
twenty-two years of age, the Government guar- 
dian of the Gulf of Mexico, to be replaced by a 
$225,000 cutter. A $350,000 cutter will make up 
the shortage of the present Alaskan fleet, 
caused by the loss of the Perry two years ago. 

The United States Navy submarine F-I es- 
tablished a new world's record for vessels of 
that type when it sank to a depth of 283 feet 
in the waters of San Francisco hay off Point 
Diablo. It remained at that depth for ten 
minutes, cruising at a speed of six knots. Then 
it rose to within nineteen feet of the surface 
again without any trouble having occurred 
during the performance. The submarine carried 
twenty-seven men all told and was submerged 
for six hours without being bothered by cross 
currents or in any way being inconvenienced. 
The previous record for depth was held by the 
United States Navy submarine Seal, a vessel of 
the Lake type, which sank to 256 feet last 
May. The boat was recently launched at the 
Union Iron Works and has been put through a 
series of tests, all of which have resulted 
favorably. 

According to reports received by the Pacific 
Coast Steamship Company from the New York 
Shipbuilding Company of Camden, N. J,, work 
is rapidly progressing on the new liner Con- 
gress. The vessel will be launched and ready 
to come to this Coast early next year, when 
she will operate in conjunction with the Gov- 
ernor and President. The construction is being 
superintended by G. W. Dickie, and an extra 
large force of men are engaged on the job 
in order that the vessel may leave the ways 
as soon as possible. The arrival of the Con- 
gress for the coastwise business will be doubly 
welcome, as the traffic is steadily increasing 
to such an extent that all the coasters are 
carrying full lists of travelers. The Congress 
will not only be the handsomest and most 
elaborately furnished vessel plying in the coast- 
wise service, but one of the safest ever con- 
structed. A double bottom, ten water-tight 
transverse bulkheads on each side of her boiler 
room, six feet from the hull and extending 
from the inner bottom to the upper deck will 
minimize the danger of sinking in case of col- 
lision. The life-saving equipment will he suffi- 
cient to take care of 840 persons, somewhat in 
excess of her passenger capacity and the num- 
ber of officers and crew. Seventeen per cent, 
larger than the President and Governor the 
Congress will be a twin-screw steamer capable 
of maintaining a speed of eighteen and a half 
knots. In length she will be twenty-five feet 
longer than the Governor and five feet wider. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an offi- 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims 
of all seafarers careful attention. 324 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg., Third Floor, California St., near 
Montgomery. Telephone, Kearny 394; Home, 
C 3832. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America. 

Afflliated with 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

and 

INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' FED- 

ERATION. 



THOS. A. HANSEN, 
570 West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK. N. T., 51 South St. 

Branches: 

BOSTON, Mass., 1%A Lewis St 
PORTLAND, Me.. 377A Fore St 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St 
BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway 
NORFOLK, Va., 221 Water St 
MOBILE, Ala.. 4 ContI St 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 535 St. Ann St 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 4 South St. Telephone 1879 

Broad. Night Call 8374 Spring. 
New York Branch, 400 West St. Telephone 5153 
Chelsea. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 258 Commercial St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 53 St. Ann St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Contl St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION OF NEW YORK 
AND VICINITY. 

Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 214 West St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, 111,, 570 West Lake St. 

Branches: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 1401 W. 9th St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
TOLEDO, O., 54 Main St. 
N. TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
ERIE, Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbrldge St., East 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111.. 9142 Mackinaw Ave 
PORT HURON, Mich., 517 Water St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y.. 71 Main St. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O.. 1185 W. Eleventh St. 
CHICAGO, 111., 445 La Salle Ave. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St., East. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 151 Reed St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis.. 1814 Fourth St. 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St.. Tel. Seneca 2295. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O., 1401 West Ninth St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 151 Reed St. 
CHICAGO, 111., 314 N. Clark St. 
ASHTABULA, O., 74 Bridge St. 
TOLEDO. O.. 54 Main St. 
DETROIT, Mich.. 7 East Woodbridge St. 
PT. HURON, Mich.. 517 Water St. 
CONNEAUT, O.. 922 Day St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
N. TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich.. 108 Fifth Ave. 
ERIE. Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, III., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 44-46 East St. 
Branches: 

VICTORIA, B. C, Old Court Rooms, Bastion 
Square. 

VANCOUVER, B. C, Labor Temple, Cor. Homer 
and Diinsmuir, P. O. Box 1365. 

TACOMA. Wash., 2218 North 30th St. 

SS^r^'i'S' Wash.. 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 65. 

PORT TOWNSEND. Wash., 114 Qulncy St.. P. O. 
Box 48. 

ABRRDEEN, Wash.. P. O. Box 6 

I'ORTl.ANI). Ore.. 51 Union Ave., Box 2100. 

KIIKRKA, Cal.. 227 First St., P. O. Box 64. 

SAN PEDRO. Cal.. P. O. Box 67 

HONOLULU, H. T.. Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts., 
i-. O. Box 314. 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBUSHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Established in 1887 



WALTER MACARTHUR Editor 

PAUL SCHARRENBERG Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six monttis 

• Advertising Rates on Application. 



$1.00 



Changes in advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To insure a prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Rusiness Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco PostofHce as second- 
class matter. 



Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
44-46 East Street, San Francisco. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published In the .TOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral Interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The .IOURN.\L is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1912. 



THE FORT STANTON SANATORIUM. 



A recent weekly bulletin of the United 
States Public Health Service contains an in- 
teresting description, together with an account 
of the work performed during the year ended 
June 30. 1912, at the tuberculosis sanatorium 
at Fort Stanton. New Mexico. 

The sanatorium wa.s established by the 
United States Government in 1899 for the 
treatment of tuberculous seamen, and 43 
square miles of land was set aside as a sana- 
torium reservation, of which about 200 acres 
are at i^resent under cultivation. No new 
buildings, except tent houses, have been 
erected, but the old buildings, abandoned as 
an army post in 1895. have been remodeled 
where necessary. The altitude of the sana- 
torium is 6200 feet. 

The treatment of patients is dealt with 
in comprehensive style. It appears that rest, 
food and fresh air arc the only curative 
measures depended upon in treating active 
tuberculosis. Medicines are given only to 
allay acute symptoms. 

General statistics regarding patients show 
that over SO per cent, of the cases are far 
advanced on admission and only a small pro- 
portion are incipient. From the opening of 
the in.stitution in 1899, to June 30, 1912, 
1.937 patients were discharged with the fol- 
lowing results : 

.\pparentlv cured 229 

.Arrested " - 291 

Improved 565 

Unimproved 184 

Dead 668 

1.937 
The average duration of treatment of the 
six hundred and sixty-eight patients who 
have died was 11 months and 25 days. Prac- 
tically all bodies are interred in the sana- 
torium cemetery. 

There is no limit to the time the patient 
may stay, and the average duration of treat- 
ment in all cases is 1 year 5 months and 16 
days. Arrested cases are restored tentative- 
ly to active life, first by graduated exercise. 
by walking, and light work, and later bv em- 
ployment with monetary compensation for a 
few months. Patients must defrav their own 



travel expenses when leaving the sanatorium. 
No patient is retained after reaching a ca- 
pacity for work sufficient to earn his living 
without detriment to his health. An effort is 
made to keep in touch with those discharged, 
and readmissions are said to be frequent in 
cases of relapse. 

The report deals extensively with dieting 
and the entire bill of fare served to patients 
during the month of June is published in de- 
tail. The actual average cost of three meals 
per patient, per day, is said to be only $0.36, 
exclusive of beef and milk, which are pro- 
duced at the station. Taking into account 
all the station products at the cost of pro- 
duction, the daily ration amounts of $0.54. 
The total cost of maintenance per patient, in- 
cluding subsistence and salaries of the 77 
officers and attendants, fuel, light, power and 
repairs to buildings, as well as all other in- 
cidental expenses, amounts to $1.55 per day. 

It is noteworthy that the sanatorium is en- 
tirely dependent upon its own resources for 
a milk supply. The dairy herd is composed 
of 132 head, and the production of milk 
averaged 442 c|uarts daily. The cost of pro- 
duction of this milk, reckoning forage and 
labor only, was $0.1823 per gallon during the 
past year. The report states that it is diffi- 
cult to estimate what milk of this (|uality 
would cost if purchased at the station, Init 
practically it would be unobtainable. 

Practically all the beef consumed at the sta- 
tion is supplied by the range herd of Here- 
fords, which numbers now about 2,000 head 
and included, on July 1, 1912. one hundred 
and ninety 3-year-old steers, which will fur- 
nish all beef needed for the next fiscal year. 
After this year it will probably be necessary 
to sell surplus stock from time to time. 

During the past year an effort was made 
to ascertain as far as possible the ultimate 
results of treatment. This work met with un- 
usual difficulties, mainly because seamen fre- 
quently change their addresses and the net 
results of the inquiry are not considered as 
gratifying. The Coast Seamen's Journal 
is given credit for having rendered valuable 
assistance in this inquiry. 

As a whole the report, written by F. C. 
Smith. Passed Assistant Surgeon in com- 
mand of the station, reflects great credit 
u])on the author, who has presented the sub- 
ject in such a manner that any layman may 
readily understand all phases of the noble 
work performed at that great public institu- 
tion and appreciate the difficult task of those 
who devote their lives to the study, cure and 
prevention of the great white plague. 



A judge of the Cincinnati Police Court 
recently ruled that it was not a criminal of- 
fense to call a scab "a scab." His honor 
correctly stated that such a term "only in- 
dicates or charges that the person referred 
to is a non-union man, taking the place of 
a striker." And yet, we have seen strikers 
fined and sentenced to imprisonment for 
whispering that gentle word on certain occa- 
sions. 



The Journal is in receipt of a political 
advertisement, arranged in the nature of a 
write-up and entitled, "Taft is Labor's Pro- 
tector." Needless to state, the advertisement 
will not be published in this sheet. "Injunc- 
tion Bill" must be very much in need of ad- 
vertising when he has to look for publicity 
in the labor press at "so much" per line! 



FRENCH SEAMEN ARBITRATE. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases ! 



The JouRN.AL in its issue of July 31 re- 
fered to the strike of the F'rench seamen 
and the probability of a sympathetic strike 
on the part of the dock workers, with whom 
the seamen are affiliated. The expected 
strike has taken place, with the result that 
shipping and commerce were paralyzed and 
the food supply seriously reduced. The 
strike was one of the most stubbornly con- 
tested battles between capital and labor that 
has ever taken place in France. 

After a two-months' struggle an arrange- 
ment has been reached under which the ques- 
tions in dispute will be submitted to arbitra- 
tion, but the men will not resume work until 
the questions to be arbitrated have been defi- 
nitely determined upon and the arbitration 
board appointed. 

There is reason to believe that these mat- 
ters will be speedily adjusted and the strike 
declared oH. 

The seamen of France have scored a great 
victory. When their schedule was first pre- 
sented to the employers, the latter answered 
in effect that the question of wages was one 
to be determined by agreement between the 
individual shipmaster and his crew. In other 
words, that there was "nothing to arbitrate." 
It has cost them a great deal to learn that, 
after all, there was "something to arbitrate." 
and the lesson they have been taught will 
long be remembered. 

That the arbitration board will concede 
the wage scale presented by the seamen 
seems a foregone conclusion. 

Hats off to the seamen of France ; the 
manly struggle they have made deserved a 
glorious victory. \''ive Le F'ederation Na- 
tional de Syndicats des Inscripts Maritime 
de PVance ! 



I50YC0TT CROWLEY'S LAUNCHES. 



As usual, the Crowley Launch and Tow- 
boat Company, of San Francisco, is the only 
firm which has refused to do what all its 
competitors did, namely, to grant the mod- 
est demands of the Marine Gasoline Engi- 
neers' Union. The record of the Crowley 
concern in this respect shows that firm as 
being opposed to improving the conditions 
of its employes under any circumstances and 
at all times. 

Although depending for a large share of 
its revenue upon the organized sailors, fire- 
men, cooks and stewards, fishermen, etc., the 
Crowley Company shows its contempt for 
organized labor whenever the opportunity 
presents itself. However, at this time a de- 
termined effort will be made to convince 
Mr. Crowley that it pays to be reasonable. 
At the last session of the San Francisco 
Labor Council the firm was placed upon the 
"unfair list" by a unanimous vote and ar- 
rangements were made to vigorously prose- 
cute the boycott. 

Some men want to be shown — and it is 
now up to those who travel on launches on 
San I'Vancisco bay to show Mr. Crowley 
that he made a mistake. 

Don't patronize the Crowley Launch and 
Towboat Company ! 



Beware of the rather numerous candidates 
for ])olitical office who proclaim themselves 
"True friends of Labor." Real friendship is 
shown by deeds and past performances and 
not by mere words and vague promises. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



HOME RULE IN TAXATION. 



By initiative petition there has been submit- 
ted to the people of California a constitutional 
amendment to which its authors give the se- 
ductive title of the "Home Rule in Taxation 
Amendment." 

The amendment is very sweeping, and if 
adopted and supplemented by appropriate legis- 
lation will permit "any county, city and county, 
city, town, district or township" to raise its 
revenue in any way directed by a majority vote 
of the people. 

When, however, we come to inquire who they 
were who expended the money and energy to 
get the necessary signatures for an initiative 
petition for an amendment which the Legisla- 
ture would not submit, we discover that it was 
those uneasy souls who like to call themselves 
"single taxers." 

It is the fact, which no "single taxer" will 
deny, that the only push behind the measure 
is the single tax push, and that the sole object 
in promoting the amendment is to get the op- 
portunity to begin a single-tax agitation in every 
political subdivision in the State. 

The foregoing i.s the kind of "editorial 
comment" the San Francisco Chronicle hands 
out to its readers regarding the pending 
amendment to the State Constitution provi- 
ding for Home Rule in Taxation. Unable to 
produce any rational arguments against the 
amendment, the Chronicle resorts to abusing 
the "push" who fathered it. The Chronicle 
is in a bad way, indeed. 

Of course, no Single Taxer will deny the 
responsibility of having promoted the amend- 
ment ; on the contrary, they are proud of 
their share in the work and will continue to 
"agitate" until the amendment is made a 
part of the organic law of the State. 

However, they are quite willing to divide 
the honor of bringing the amendment before 
the people with other bodies of "agitators" — 
for instance, the League of California Mu- 
nicipalities, the Assessors' Association, the 
Labor Councils, and last, but not least, the 
State Federation of Labor. 

Whether the latter bodies are anxious to 
commence an agitation for Single Tax, we 
do not know. We know, however, that they 
favor Home Rule in Taxation ; and while 
we realize that the proprietor of the Chron- 
icle, the Hon. Michael Henry De Young, 
has in mind his several blocks of unimproved 
vacant land situated within the City and 
County of San Francisco, we think, never- 
theless, that the Chronicle ought to confine 
itself to the question before the house. 



ROOSEVELT AND THE JAPS. 



Now that Theodore, the crusader, has 
entered California it is timely to remind 
his worshipers that this great redeemer is 
the same per.son who a few years ago 
threatened this State with "all the 
forces, military and civil, of the United 
States." Why? Because the mothers of 
white native children objected to the 
presence in the primary schools of grown- 
up Japs with unspeakable morals. And 
along with this infamous threat the same 
reformer recommended to Congress "that 
an act be passed specially providing for 
the naturalization of Japanese who come 
here intending to become American citi- 
zens." 

What did Roosevelt care for the views 
of his countrymen in California then? If 
he had his way in the matter the Pacific 
slope would to-day have a substantial num- 
ber of Jap citizens to help welcome and 
applaud the crusader. It is true that 
nothing came of his desire to naturalize 
the Jai> — for in all Ainerica he did not 
find a sufficient number of sycophants to en- 
courage him in his impossible programme. 



So he dropped the subject matter for the 
time being but he has never acknowledged 
that his views have changed. 

What are your views to-day, Theodore 
Roosevelt? Are you still in favor of nat- 
uralizing the Japs? Do you still believe 
that it is a "wicked absurdity" to exclude 
the Jap from this land? 

Or have you turned face about? 

And the echo says: "Have you"? 



Strange to relate the Los Angeles Times 
and journals of like character do not take 
any delight in denouncing William M. 
Wood, the indicted millionaire president of 
the American Woolen Company, for caus- 
ing dynamite to be planted during the 
strike of Lawrence textile workers, and 
Detective Burns has not yet laid the blame 
for this latest outrage upon Gompers and 
his associates. But if some poor, unfor- 
tunate, half-starved textile worker had been 
indicted for the same oflfense the Times 
would have issued a special edition to 
show the general depravity of all workers 
and Burns would have said : "I told you 
so." It does seem to make some differ- 
ence whose ox is gored. 



PANAMA CANAL ACT. 



Following is the section of the Panama 
Canal Act, now in effect, which provides that 
no tolls shall be levied upon United States 
coa.stwise vessels and permits the operation of 
foreign-built vessels under American registry 
in the foreign trade : 

Sec. 5. That the President is hereby author- 
ized to prescribe and from time to time change 
the tolls that shall be levied by the Govern- 
ment of the United States for the use of the 
Panama Canal; provided, that no tolls, when 
prescribed as above, shall be changed, unless six 
moiUhs' notice thereof shall have been given by 
the President by proclamation. No tolls shall 
be levied upon vessels engaged in the coastwise 
trade of the United States. That section forty- 
one hundred and thirty-two of the Revised Stat- 
utes is hereby amended to read as follows: 

"Sec. 4132. Vessels built within the United 
States and belonging wholly to citizens thereof; 
and vessels which may be captured in war by 
citizens of the United States and lawfully con- 
demned as prize, or which may be adjudged to 
be forfeited for a breach of the laws of the 
United States; and seagoing vessels, whether 
steam or sail, which have been certified by the 
Steamboat-Inspection Service as safe to carry 
dry and perishable cargo, not more than five 
years old at the time they apply for registry, 
wherever built, which arc to engage only in 
trade with foreign countries or with the Philip- 
pine Islands and the islands of Guam and Tu- 
tuila, being wholly owned by citizens of the 
United States or corporations organized and 
chartered under the laws of the United States 
or of any State thereof, the president and man- 
aging directors of which shall be citizens of the 
United States, and no others, may be registered 
as directed in this title. Foreign-built vessels 
registered pursuant to this Act shall not engage 
in the coastwise trade; provided, that a foreign- 
built yacht, pleasure boat, or vessel, not used or 
intended to be used for trade, admitted to Amer- 
ican registry pursuant to this section, shall not 
be exempt from the collection of ad valorem 
duty provided in section thirty-seven of the Act 
approved August fifth, nineteen hundred and 
nine, entitled 'An Act to provide revenue, equal- 
ize duties, and encourage the industries of the 
United States, and for other purposes.' " That 
all materials of foreign production which may 
be necessary for the construction or repair of 
vessels built in the United States and all such 
materials necessary for the building or repair of 
their machinery, and all articles necessary for 
their outfit and equipment may be imported into 
the United States free of duty under such regu- 
lations as the Secretary of the Treasury may 
prescribe; provided further, that such vessels so 
admitted under the provisions of this section 
may contract with the Postmaster-General, under 
the Act of March third, eighteen hundred and 
ninety-one, entitled "An Act to provide for ocean 
mail service between the United States and for- 
eign ports, and to promote commerce," so long 
as such vessels shall in all respects comply with 
the provisions and requirements of said Act. 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 10, 1912. 
Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7:30 
p. m., E. A. Erickson presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipning good. Delegates were nomi- 
nated for the .\nnual Convention of the Inter- 
national Seamen's Union of America, to be held 
at Seattle, Wash. 



Sept. 16, 1912. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7:30 
p. m., Ed. Andersen presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping good. A. Thomal resigned as 
Agent at Portland, Or,, and Otto Dittmar was 
elected Agent to fill the unexpired term. Ship- 
wreck Benefit was awarded to two members of 
the crew of the steam-schooner Wasp. 

ANDREW FURUSETH, Secretary. 

44-46 East St. Bell Phone Kearny 2228. 
Home Phone J 2228. 



Victoria, B. C, Sept. 7. 1912. 
Shipping good. 

ARCHIE KING, Agent. 
Old Court Rooms, Bastion Square. 

Vancouver, B. C., Sept. 7, 1912. 
Shipping fair. 

JOHN PEARSON, Agent. 
Labor Temple, cor. Homer and Dunsmuir. 
P. O. Box 1365. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 7, 1912. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping medium; 
men scarce. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 7, 1912. 
Shipping dull. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Port Townsend Agency, Sept. 7, 1912. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping poor; 
prospects uncertain. 

WALTER MOLLER, Agent. 
229J^ Water St. P. O. Box 48. Tel. 141 J. 



.Aberdeen Agency, Sejit. 7, 1912. 
Shipi^iiig fair; prospects uncertain. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. 2002. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 7, 1912. 
Shipping dull; prospects uncertain. 

A. THOMAL, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2100. 51 Union Ave. Tel. East 
4912. 



Eureka Agency, Sept. 7, 1912. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping medium; 
prospects uncertain. 

JOHN W. ERICKSEN, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 553 R. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 7, 1912. 
Shipping and prosp£Cts good. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 67. Tel. 137, L. 



Honolulu .Agency, Sept. 2, 1912. 
Shipping fair; prospects poor. 

CHAS. TAUCER, Agent. 
Cor. Oueen and Nuuanu Sts. P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., .Sept. 12. 1912. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7 p. m., Eugene Burke in the chair. Secretary 
rcjiorted shipping fair, plenty of men ashore. 
The Shipwreck Benetit was ordered paid to a 
member wrecked on steamer Rosecrans. Ballot- 
ing on delegate to the California State Federa- 
tion of Labor Convention was proceeded with. 
EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 5. 1912. 
No meeting. Shipping medium. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
P. O. Box 1335. 1003 Western Ave. Phone 
Sun Main 2233. 



San Pedro .\gency, Sept. 4, 1912. 
No meeting. Shipping fair; i)rospects better; 
few men ashore. 

HARRY POTHOFF, Agent. 
P. O. Box 54. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



*^^* 



OIS THE GREAT LAKES. 



Contributed by the Lake Seamen's Union 



^^^^^ 



PROGRESS OF SEAMEN'S BILL. 



The present status of the Seamen's bill 
does not seem to be fully understood by 
many who are interested in its progress. 
Reports of an alleged "defeat" of the 
bill in the United States Senate are un- 
true. Far from being defeated, it passed 
the House of Representatives by almost 
unanimous action and has already made 
some headway in the Senate. It must not 
be forgotten that it did not reach the 
Senate until' very shortly before adjourn- 
ment of Congress, when there was com- 
paratively little time available for its con- 
sideration. The present Congress con- 
venes again in December, the House action 
stands as it is, and the bill will then 
come up in the Senate as a measure 
already approved by one branch of the 
Congress. That is the correct status of 
the bill now. 

It is true that the Senate ought to 
have disposed of the bill before adjourn- 
ing. To adjourn Congress without enact- 
ing laws providing for better and safer 
conditions at sea, after having had over 
four months to investigate and ponder 
over the Titanic horror, was wrong and 
inexcusable. But it was hardly to be ex- 
pected that the Senate would act with 
any greater promptness, when it is remem- 
bered that many aggravating delays were 
experienced in the House, where months 
had elapsed before the bill came up for 
passage. Nothing has occurred since the 
bill went to the Senate that ought to be 
considered as discouraging by friends of 
the bill. 

The following is a summary of the prog- 
ress made during the present Congress: 
The bill was first introduced by the Hon. 
William 13. ^^■ilson, of Pennsylvania, on 
June 8, 1911, and was then known as 
House Rill No. 11372. On December 14, 

1911, the Committee on Merchant Marine 
and Fisheries began its hearings. In April, 

1912, after the bill had been given a great 
deal of study in committee Congressman 
Wilson re-introduced it in amended form, 
and it became House Bill No. 23673. 

The Committee on Merchant Marine and 
Fisheries presented a report to the House 
on May 2nd, recommending the passage 
of the bill. On July 18, the Committee 
on Rules offered a resolution, which was 
adopted, making the bill privileged, and its 
consideration on the floor of the House 
began on that date. 

Opponents of the measure at once be- 
gan filibustering against it, seeking to 
delay its passage. They succeeded in 
holding it back until August 3d, when 
Congressman Frank Buchanan, of Chicago, 
served notice on the House that he would 
permit no more action by unanimous con- 
sent until the Seamen's bill was taken up 
and disposed of. Tliis forced action, the 
bill was again taken up, and after some 
further debate it passed the House on the 
.>^ame day. It should be noted here that 
Congressman Buchanan, whose determined 
stand brought the bill to passage, is a 
union man. and was for a number of 
years president of the International As- 



sociation of Bridge and Structural Iron 
Workers. 

.After having passed the House on Au- 
gust 3rd, the bill made its appearance in 
the Senate on August 5th, and was re- 
ferred to the Committee on Commerce 
where it was placed in the hands of a sub- 
committee of five Senators for considera- 
tion. The sub-committee met on August 
12th, held a hearing and decided that there 
was not sufficient time for action on the 
measure before adjournment, which was 
then not far off. It further decided in 
order to facilitate action at the next ses- 
sion of Congress, which will convene in 
December, that the sub-committee will 
meet in Washington during the last week 
of November, for the purpose of holding 
hearings and preparing for action on the 
bill. 

Following this decision of the sub-com- 
mittee, some important proposed amend- 
ments, which will materially strengthen 
and improve the bill, were on August 19th 
introduced in the Senate by Senator La 
Follette, of Wisconsin. The shipowners 
who are opposing the bill will find that 
a number of the amendments, which would 
not have been proposed if there had been 
no delay until next session, will now be 
adopted. 

At the committee hearing of August 
12th. it developed that the Lake Carriers' 
Association, which is generally recognized 
as a mouthpiece of the Steel Trust in 
marine matters, is about to attempt some 
rather desperate measures in an effort to 
convince the Senate against the bill. Har- 
vey D. Goulder, the general counsel for the 
association, stated to the committee that 
if given the necessary time and oppor- 
tunity he was prepared to bring "sea- 
men" and "firemen" to show that condi- 
tions on the Great Lakes were "ab.solutely 
satisfactory." 

It is evident that the shipowners oppo- 
sing the bill have found themselves unable 
to present any reasonable argument against 
it. Their lawyers have also failed. There- 
fore some non-union sailors and firemen, 
unable to protest against being used for 
such jjurposes, cringing under the notori- 
ous "Welfare" blacklisting scheme of the 
Lake Carirers, are now to be brought 
forward to say that they, as seamen, do 
not want any legislation. Rut there will 
be little difBculty in unmasking both the 
Lake Carriers and their helpless tools when 
the committee hearings begin in Novem- 
ber. 

In the meantime the Seamen's Union 
will probably make good use of the delay 
by bringing more proofs, undeniable facts, 
I)efore the public to show the pressing 
national necessity for the enactment of this 
measure. House Bill No. 23673, and the 
proposed amendments thereto as submit- 
ted by Senator La Follette. 

The above summary of the progress of 
the Seamen's bill requires for its comple- 
tion some special reference to the Hon. 
William B. Wilson, of Pennsylvania, the 
father of the bill in the last session of 
Congress. Too much can not be said of 
the splendid services he has rendered to 



the seamen and all other workingmen 
and women, as well as to the general 
jniblic, since he became a member of the 
House of Representatives. Congressman 
Wilson is a man of intense human sympa- 
thy, keen visioned and broadminded, hu- 
manitarian in every sense. It required a 
strong character like his to grasp as 
quickly and thoroughly as he did, the tre- 
mendous national importance of remedying 
the wrongs under which the men of the 
sea now suffer. His fight for justice and 
right was unceasingly persistent. The sea- 
men are fortunate in having him as their 
cham|)ion. 

(Organized labor has reason to be proud 
of the fact that Congressman Wilson is a 
member of its ranks, a union coal miner, 
who through actual experience as a part 
of it has learned to know and understand 
the great aims and objects of the labor 
movement. For a number of years he was 
the secretary of the United Mine Workers 
of America. He is chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Labor in the House of Repre- 
sentatives which, under his leadership, has 
recommended more constructive legislation 
in behalf of labor, during a comparatively 
brief period of time, than has any similar 
committee in previous years. 

The people of Pennsylvania performed 
a material service to the entire country 
when they sent "Rill" Wilson to Congress. 
God speed the day when many more like 
him will be seated in the lawmaking 
bodies of this nation. 

V. A. Or..\Ni>ER, Secretary, 

Lake Seamen's Union. 



Lake shipbuilders now are figuring on 
two vessels for the coastwise and Panama 
Canal trade for parties on the Atlantic 
Coast, to be finished by the time the canal 
is opened. V'essels built in Cleveland, Lo- 
rain and other Great Lakes ports now are 
plying in the Atlantic coastwise trade and 
to South America. Men close to the ship- 
ping business say that vessels up to 250 
feet in length face no trouble in making 
the trip from Cleveland to the coast. They 
are of the opinion that opening of the 
canal may cause decided increase in the 
business of Lake shipbuilders. "The pass- 
ing of the bill," says the Iron Trade Re- 
view, "is bound to provide work in abun- 
dance for American shipyards. This in 
turn will add to the stimulus now being 
given the steel industry, for a ship is noth- 
ing but a fabrication of steel in its various 
forms." 



Lake Superior is the only one of the 
Great Lakes showing a higher level in 
July than in June, according to the month- 
ly report of the United States Lake Sur- 
vey Office in this city. Huron and Michi- 
gan remained at the same level, while 
Erie and Ontario made recessions. The 
stages of the Lakes in feet above tide- 
water, New York, were: Superior, 606.26; 
Michigan-Huron, 580.48; Erie, 572.58; On- 
tario, 247.01. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases I 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



SABOTAGE. 



"Sabotage" is a word of French origin. 
In English, as favored by its friends, it 
means "force — anything to win." It was 
practically unknown in this country until 
W. D. Haywood discovered it on his re- 
cent European trip. Since then it has been 
urged by both he and the Chicago wing 
of the Industrial Workers of the World, 
who declare against political action, and 
who are called "the bummery" by the De- 
troit faction of the same organization. 

Under the "sabotage" plan of striking, 
men don't walk out. They stay on the 
job, and whenever they find opportunity 
they destroy property. In the coal region 
they would ruin the mine by flooding it 
with water, by putting pumps "accidental- 
ly" out of commission. In a machine shop, 
emery dust would be mysteriously placed 
in the machinery. In France it has been 
said that waiters "accidentally" put castor 
oil in the vinegar bottles. 

The scheme appeals to the ignorant and 
base among workers. It is defended by 
"revolutionary" editors, interested in boom- 
ing their circulation; alleged intellectuals, 
who are ignorant of unionism or even work 
shops ; and platform orators who see in 
this theory good advertising material, be- 
cause it stamps them as "revolutionists." 

It doesn't take a brave man to advocate 
"sabotage." In fact, it's a coward's doc- 
trine. It calls for no intelligence in its 
application, and results in a terrorism that 
the Nihilist of Russia, who risks his life, 
would scorn. The doctrine of "sabotage" 
grows where intelligence is at a low ebb. 
Its public defenders are aware of this 
psychology, and appeal to the victims of 
repression and force, who have been 
dumped on our shores by brutal capitalists, 
now called upon to pay the cost by facing 
a doctrine foreign to our institutions and 
belief. 

The cause for "sabotage" is the em- 
ployers. Men like Ha^^wood could not suc- 
cessfully defend "sabotage" if the cause did 
not exist. "Sabotage" will never solve 
anything — it is destruction. It is not con- 
structive. It does not demand brains, rea- 
son or logic. It rests on force that strikes 
in the dark, and will therefore never win — 
any more than the present practices of 
capitalists can continue without interrup- 
tion and without check. 

If "sabotage" is right, so is war. And 
so is brute force in any other form, re- 
gardless of who it is favored by. — Toledo 
Union Leader. 



Two bids, one from the Robertson Elec- 
tric Construction Company, of Bufifalo, and 
the other from the D'Olier Centrifugal 
Pump & Machine Company, of Philadel- 
phia, were submitted to Colonel James G. 
Warren, United States Engineer for the 
Buffalo district, for the electrification of 
the new ship lock at Black Rock. The 
bid of the Robertson Company is low at 
$22,009.88, and it will probably be award- 
ed the contract. 



The American Shipbuilding Company has 
purchased the small steamer M. H. Boyce. 
She will be operated between the Lake 
Erie plants of the company and Port Ar- 
thur to carry steel and other supplies. 



HAWAII'S TRADE INCREASE. 



David Lloyd Conkling, treasurer of the 
Island of Hawaii, has just succeeded in 
placing a loan of $1,500,000 in New York. 
The proceeds, together with the sum of 
$1,000,000 recently voted by the Hawaiian 
Legislature, will be devoted to dock and 
other improvements made urgent by the 
approaching completion of the Panama 
Canal. It is confidently anticipated that 
the opening of the isthmian waterway will 
contribute immensely toward the develop- 
ment and prosperity of the Islands. For 
one thing, it is expected that it will reduce 
by one-half the cost of transporting sugar, 
the chief product of the possession, to the 
eastern coast of the United States. At 
present sugar shipments from Hawaii must 
bear the expense of four different hand- 
lings. Sugar is shipped to Salina Cruz, 
the Pacific port of the isthmus of Tehaun- 
tepec ; there it is reloaded and transported 
by rail to the Gulf of Mexico, where it 
is reshipped for northern destinations. 
The Panama Canal will cut out two of 
these rehandlings and make rail trans- 
portation unnecessary. 

In less than ten years the sugar crop 
of Hawaii has increased from 250,000 to 
600,000 tons, this being due not only to 
the increase in the world's demand for 
sugar but to improved methods in cultiva- 
tion and trade. It is an interesting fact 
that Hawaiian-made machinery for the 
manufacture of sugar is now exported to 
other sugar-growing countries, including 
Formosa and the Philippines. The cheap- 
ness of sugar on the Islands and their 
productiveness in fruits are advantages that 
are combining, even under present adverse 
circumstances, to build up another great 
industry, that of fruit canning and pre- 
serving. Present shipping rates for fruit 
and fruit products are almost prohibitive. 
These will be g/eatly reduced by direct 
water transportation to the eastern coast 
of the mainland. Despite the present high 
cost of transportation, the canned pine- 
apple industry of Hawaii alone has in- 
creased a hundredfold since 1903. 

Since the Pacific fleet entered Honolulu 
in 1908, when the inadequacy of the docks 
became apparent to all, there have been 
many improvements in harbor facilities. 
At that time there was dock accommoda- 
tion for eight large vessels only ; now there 
is accommodation for twelve, and a large 
part of the money now at the disposal of 
the authorities will be used in increasing 
these accommodations to sixteen. But all 
the funds recently raised will not be spent 
upon harbor improvements. The indica- 
tions point to a large increase of popula- 
tion in Honolulu and other centers. Ex- 
penditures will therefore be made upon 
water supply and sewer extensions. The 
Hawaiian government has exhibited excel- 
lent judgment in all of its undertakings 
(luring the last ten years; it is enterprising 
but prudent. While it aims to provide for 
the increasing needs of the people, their 
industries and their commerce, it is not led 
by the prospects of a boom even now to 
indulge in extravagances, and as a conse- 
quence of its conservatism its credit is be- 
yond any drafts yet made upon it. — Chris- 
tian Science Monitor. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases ! 



NOTICE TO SEAMEN. 



IMPORTANT. 



Any seaman who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above sta- 
ted reasons, or because of rules of the so- 
called "Welfare Plan," by any agent or 
representative of the Lake Carriers' Asso- 
ciation or any of its allied concerns, in- 
cluding the masters and officers of the 
ships. Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 
V. A. OLANDER, Secretary, 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

Joseph Orlick, last heard of on steamer 
Santa Marie, in 1908, is inquired for by 
Carl Stocket, 71 Main street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Ed Jordan, No. 10415, L. S. U., is inquired 
for by his sister, Mrs. Raynor, 319 Caroline 
Street South, Hamilton. Any one knowing 
his whereabouts please notify the above ad- 
dress. 



LAKE DISTRICT, I. S. U. of A. 

HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

570 West Lake Street, Chicago, III. 
BRANCHES AND AGENCIES. 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, 21 High Street 

Telephone 552. 

TOLEDO, OHIO 54 Main Street 

Telephone Bell East 756. 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone, New, Broad 385. 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

CONNEAUT, 992 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 
HEADQUARTERS. 
71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone Seneca 48. 

BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO. ILL 445 LaSalle Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1814 Fourth Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 

HEADQUARTERS. 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 2295. 
BRANCHES. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 314 N. Clark Street 

ASHTABULA, 74 Bridge Street 

TOLEDO, 54 Main Street 

DETROIT. MICH 7 East Woodbridge Street 

PORT HURON, MICH 617 Water Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

SUPERIOR. WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 
MARINE HOSPITALS. 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 
RELIEF STATIONS. 

Ashland, Wis. Ogdensburg, N. T. 

Ashtabula Harbor, O. Oswego, N. Y. 

Buffalo, N. Y. Port Huron, Mich. 

Duluth, Minn. Manitowoc, Wis. 

Escanaba, Mich. Marquette, Mich. 

Grand Haven, Mich. Milwaukee. Wis. 

Green Bay, Mich. Saginaw, Mich. 

Houghton, Mich. Sandusky, O. 

T^udington, Mich. Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 

Manistee, Mich. Sheboygan, Wis. 

Erie, Pa. Superior, Wis, 

Menominee, Mich. Toledo. O, 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WIRELESS LAW AMENDED. 



The J 'resident has ai)])r()ved tlie new- 
law regulatings the wireless e(iuipment on 
ocean and lake steamers. 

The principal points of difference be- 
tween the new law and the old one. which 
became effective July 1. 1911, is that the 
amended act requires steamship lines to 
have aboard their vessels two or more 
skilled operators, one of whom shall be 
on duty at all times; and that it makes 
mandatory the installment of an auxiliary 
power su])ply. indei)endent of the ship's 
main electric plant. As far as the naviga- 
tion of the Great Lakes is concerned, the 
new law becomes operative April 1, 1913. 
As for ocean cargo steamers the law be- 
comes effective July 1. 1913. 

Following is the full text of the act 
(S. 281.S) as approved by the President: 

"That Section 1 of an act entitled. 'An 
act to require apparatus and operators for 
radio communication on certain ocean 
steamers,' approved June 24. 1910, be 
amended so that it will read as follows : 

•' 'Section 1. — That from and after Oc- 
tober 1, 1912, it shall be unlawful for any 
steamer of the United States or of any 
foreign country navigating the ocean or the 
Great Lakes and licensed to carry, or car- 
rying, 50 or more persons, including pas- 
sengers or crew or both, to leave or at- 
tempt to leave any port of the United 
States unless such steamer shall be 
equipped with an efficient apparatus for 
radio communication, in good working or- 
der, capable of transmitting and receiving 
messages over a distance of at least 100 
miles, day or night. 

" 'An auxiliary power supply, independ- 
ent of the vessel's main electric power 
plant, must be provided which will enable 
the sending set for at least four hours to 
send messages over a distance of at least 
100 miles, day or night, and efficient com- 
munication between the operator in the 
radio room and the bridge shall be main- 
tained at all times. 

" 'The radio equipment must be in charge 
of two or more persons skilled in the use 
of such apparatus, one or the other of 
whom shall be on duty at all tiines while 
the vessel is being navigated. Such equip- 
ment, operators, the regulation of their 
watches and the transmission and receipt 
of messages, except as may be regulated 
by law or international agreement, shall be 
under the control of the master, in the 
case of a vessel of the United States; and 
every wilful failure on the part of the mas- 
ter to enforce at sea the provisions of this 
paragraph as to equipment, operators and 
watches shall subject him to a penalty of 
one hundred dollars. 

" 'That the provisions of this section shall 
not apply to steamers plying between ports 
or places less than two hundred miles 
apart.' 

" 'Section 2. — That this act, so far as it 
relates to the Great Lakes, shall take effect 
on and after April 1, 1913, and so far as 
it relates to ocean cargo steamers shall 
take effect on and after July 1. 1913: Pro- 
vided, That on cargo steamers, in lieu of 
the second operator provided for in this 
act. there may be substituted a member of 
the crew or other person who shall be duly 
certified and entered in the ship's log as 
competent to receive and understand dis- 
tress calls or other usual calls indicating 



danger, and to aid in maintaining a con- 
.stant wireless watch so far as required for 
the safetv of life.' " 



FURUSETH'S REPORT. 

(Continued from Page 1.) 



Mr. Xl'"LSOX: As soon as that bill came to 
the Committee on Commerce, being a bill of 
considerable importance, it was referred to a sub- 
committee of live members. The sub-committee 
had it under consideration for a brief time and 
finally, at the last meeting of the committee, 
when there was not a quorum present, I was 
advised by the sub-committee that they were 
unable to dispose of it at this session. 1 see 
two members of the sub-committee present, the 
Senator from Virginia [Mr. Martin] and the 
Senator from South Dakota [Mr. Crawford], to 
give the Senator from Wisconsin some further 
information on the subject. My understanding 
was that the sub-committee felt that they could 
not dispose of the bill at the present session of 
Congress, and for that reason they were not 
ready to report to the full committee. 

Mr. L.\ FOLLETTE: I would like to inquire 
of the Senator from South Dakota, who is a 
member of the sub-committee, whether any ac- 
tion has been taken by the sub-committee look- 
ing to an early report on the bill? 

Mr. CR.'^WEORD: I will say that the bill 
did not reach the Senate until quite late in the 
session- only a few weeks ago. It was pending 
in the House for a long time. The sub-com- 
mittee had a meeting and had some hearings. A 
representative of the seamen was heard one 
night and some of the representatives of the 
shipping interests were heard. 

The bill, in its general features, I think I am 
safe in saying, we favor, but in its details there 
are very important questions involved, and it 
was so near the end of the session that after 
the hearing the sub-committee came to the con- 
clusion that it would he impossible, on account 
of conditions in the Senate and the lateness of 
the time, to get it back in season for us to 
have a hearing in the Senate, and the sub- 
committee so reported to the committee last 
Thursday. 

The sub-committee did decide that in the last 
week of November, before the regular session 
begins, it would give a week to the considera- 
tion of the bill: that the members of the sub- 
committee would come on here to Washington 
for that purpose, and the parties interested were 
to be notified in the meantime to present in a 
short, crisp way their objections to the bill, so 
that the committee might do effective work in 
considering it during the week preceding the he- 
ginning of the regular session, with a view to 
getting in a report early in the session, so that 
the bill might come up without any undue delay 
for disposition at the next session. 

That is the situation in regard to it. 

Tt will be seen that we must be prepared to 
appear in Washington in the last week in No- 
vember to meet such objections as the ship- 
owners shall bring there, .\mendments intended 
to strengthen the bill as it came from the House 
were submitted by Senator T.a Follette of W'is- 
consin and it is very probable that this delay 
will fmally prove of some advantage. The.se 
amendments were published in full in the last 
issue of the Journal. 

Our most bitter antagonists admit that the 
bill will pass. So w-e may confidently expect 
its passage at an earlv date. 

.ANDREW FURUSETH. 

San Francisco, Sept. 12, 1912. 



LABOR'S ECONOMIC PLATfORIi. 



The Curieuse, a fifty-six-ton topsail 
.schooner, with a crew of nine men under 
the command of Captain Rallier du Baty, 
has left Boulogne on a voyage of explora- 
tion which is expected to last three years. 
This small craft is expected to carry out 
an even more extensive and interesting 
voyage than that made to the Kcrguelen 
Islands in the J. B. Charcot from 1907 to 
1909 by Captain Du Baty. The vessel is 
fitted with a motor and carries a large 
supply of gasoline. She calls at Madeira, 
the Cape and the Kerguelen Islands. Sub- 
sequently she will go to Melbourne, follow 
the Australian coast, exploring its northern 
seaboard, and proceed to the Coral Sea 
and the islands situated between Australia 
and New Guinea. The return journey will 
be made through the Panama Canal. 



The new steamschooner Davenport, built for 
the Davenports at Coos Bay, arrived at San 
FVancisco on September 8 in tow of the steamer 
Tiverton. The new vessel will receive 850- 
horsepowcr engines. She is 212 feet long, 40 
foot beam and lAyi feet deep, with a lumber- 
carrying capacity of 900,000 feet. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities, 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted into 
law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of United States Gov- 
ernment Postal Savings Banks. 

INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OP AMERICA. 

(Continued from Pnge 5.) 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO. Cal., 91 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 1408V4 Western Ave., P. O. Box 
875. 

PORTI-ANn. Ore., 101 N. Front St. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., 12.'? Fifth St., P. O. Box 574. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 51 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 209-210 Powell Building, P. O 
Box 1335. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal.. P. O. Box 54. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

Branches: 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

LA CONNER, Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN, Wash.. P. (). Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGETOWN, Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER, Ore. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 

KETCHIKAN. 
I.ORING, Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBURG. Alaska. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. 93 Steuart St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE. Wash., 84 Seneea St., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA. Ore., P. O. Box 138. 



The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be procured by seamen at 
any of the above-mentioned places; 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASIA 

29 ERSKINE STREET. SYDNEY, N. 8. W, 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



"LET GLASGOW FLOURISH!" 



Big doings at Glasgow! Brass bands, 
banners, big crowds, and — it didn't rain ! 

Fact ! The rain actually quit long 
enough to permit of a short parade. Per- 
haps the rain was tired ! 

The occasion of these "doin's" was a 
special meeting of the members of the 
Glasgow branch, for the purpose of hearing 
reports from General President Wilson and 
the Finance Committee. 

The meeting was held in St. Mungo's 
Hall, Gorbals. The locality is the most 
densely populated in the city. The streets 
literally swarmed with people. As for 
"kiddies" — well, they were there in full 
numbers and variety. 

The windows of the closely-built tene- 
ments of three and four stories were filled 
with spectators. The combination of a 
balmy evening and a brass band is calcu- 
lated to attract the crowd at any time, 
more especially if it be a rather rare com- 
bination. Everybody turned out to see the 
sailors and hear the big drum. 

God must love the people of the Gorbals 
very much. He certainly has made a great 
many of them ! 

There has been some trouble in this 
port. During the big strike of last year 
a Mr. E. Shinwell, a tailor by trade, in- 
terested himself in the work of the branch. 
He rendered good service, and was ap- 
pointed to a subordinate office under the 
District Secretary. 

Gradually this individual worked himself 
into a position of authority, finally securing 
the appointment, pro tern., as Secretary of 
the Glasgow branch. He then proceeded 
to kick the ladder from under him. That 
is to say, he made charges against the Dis- 
trict Secretary. 

The Finance Committee began an in- 
vestigation of these charges, but found that 
the accusers were not prepared to present 
evidence. Instead, they insisted upon 
recognition and confirmation of Mr. Shin- 
well, as Secretary of the branch. 

The Finance Committee rejected this 
proposal, being without power to grant it 
under the laws of the National. As a re- 
sult nothing was done. 

Mr. Shinwell then threw down the gage 
of battle. A meeting of the branch was 
held, at which it was resolved to send no 
more money to Headquarters. This action 
was followed, of course, by the dismissal 
of Shinwell and certain other officials act- 
ing under his direction. 

ShinwelTs next move was to "break 
away" from the National and to form a 
new union, under the name of the "Scottish 
Sailors' and Firemen's Union." 

Some lively scenes have been enacted 
along the Broomielaw during the past two 
weeks. Ever been on the Broomielaw? 
Yes? Then you can understand. Mount a 
chair at any street-corner, open your 
mouth and emit a roar — and the crowd 
will do the rest! 

However the Glasgow branch of the 
National Sailors' and Firemen's Union of 
Great Britain and Ireland is still in busi- 
ness and still occupying the old shop in 
the Broomielaw. 

The meeting in St. Mungo's Hall was 
largely attended by members in good 
standing. Several delegates from the local 
Trades Council, of which Mr. Shinwell is 



Chairman, were also present by invitation. 
The proceedings were opened with a song 
by all hands. Here is a sample verse : 

SONG OF THE 1912 LEVY. 
(To the tune, "Tramp, Tramp, Tramp, the 
Boys are Marching.") 
There was once a great sea fight. 
And it gave John Bull a fright — 
'Twas the seamen "out" to battle for 
their own 
When neglected by the State, and con- 
signed unto a fate 
Worse than anything the sea had ever 
known. 

Chorus — Come, boys, come and pay the 
Levy, 

There'll be another fight ere long; 
And to hold what now we've got. 
And to get what now we've not, 

Needs a war-chest pretty full and mighty 
strong I 

The local situation was fully explained 
by Comrade Wilson. Father C. P. Hop- 
kins, one of the Union's Trustees, read 
the report of the Finance Committee and 
delivered a rattling address. General Sec- 
retary Cathery made an earnest plea for 
international solidarity among seamen. The 
new Secretary of the Glasgow branch, 
"Jimmy" Hanson, assured the meeting that 
he would be found "on the job" at all 
times. 

Two of the local delegates, Thomas 
Nicholson and Victor Hill, who have ren- 
dered especial service in the recent trouble, 
were each presented with a gold watch, the 
gift of the members on the northeast coast. 

Resolutions were unanimously adopted, 
approving the action of the National Exec- 
utive in dismissing Shinwell and his fol- 
lowers and pledging the loyalty of the 
Glasgow branch to the National LTnion. 

Court proceedings in the form of an 
injunction, or interdict, as it is called here, 
have resulted favorably to the National, 
and altogether it looks as though the "old 
firm" is doing very well. 

By the way, do you wish anything in 
the shipbuilding line — a Dreadnought, a 
dredger, a tanker, a liner, or anything like 
that? If so, just drop a postal to any one 
of a dozen concerns on the Clyde, and have 
the goods delivered at your door in the 
afternoon. Walter Macarthur. 

Glasgow, August 30, 1912. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



The largest passenger liner for the transpa- 
cific trade was launched a few days ago on the 
Clyde. She is the steamer Empress of Russia, 
and will operate in the service of the Canadian 
Pacific Railway from Far Eastern ports to 
British Columbia. The vessel is a palatial three- 
funneled liner, with cruiser stern, of 14,500 tons 
register, with a guaranteed speed of twenty-one 
knots on her trial and an average sea speed of 
nineteen knots an hour. The Board of Trade 
standard of safety provides that modern pas- 
senger liners shall be buoyant with two com- 
partments flooded, and the new Empress of 
Russia is the first modern steamer that will 
float with four compartments filled. The nearest 
approach in size and speed of the transpacific 
carriers to the new Empress are the Shinyo 
Maru, Chiyo Maru and Tenyo Maru of the 
Toyo Kisen Kaisha, vessels of 12,500 tons regis- 
ter. 

By the law of necessity which prevails 
the aims and objects of the trade-union 
movement are becoming more and more 
universal. Step by step, guided by expe- 
rience, they are moving in the same chan- 
nel, widening their scope and embracing 
new opportunities for better ecomonic 
conditions. This law applies to the whole 
civilized world. — Cigar Makers' Journal. 



equipment will be provided. The law also 
provides that postage on all parcels post 
be prepaid by affixing distinctive stamps. 
It is also provided by law that there shall 
be indemnification for lost or damaged 
articles. The question of adequate trans- 
portation and terminal facilities for the 
parcels post on railway and steamboat lines 
and the city wagon service is one that 
has to be worked out in order to insure 
the prompt movement of such mail and 
prevent clogging. It is believed that by 
the time the law is to be put into opera- 
tion all preparations necessary will have 
been made and that slight friction will 



Only Union-Mined Coal. 

A bill providing that all public institu- 
tions of the State of Indiana shall be re- 
quired to burn coal mined with eight-hour 
labor will be introduced in the next ses- 
sion of the Indiana Legislature. It is re- 
ported that many coal operators are in 
favor of the measure and will use their 
influence with other operators of the State. 
The bill will be broad enough in its scope 
to include all the coal burned by the 
penal, benevolent, and educational institu- 
tions of the State. The bill will be in- 
cluded in the list of questions to be sub- 
mitted by the legislative committee of the 
United Mine Workers to every candidate 
on the legislative ticket. The bill, if passed, 
will mean that contracts now let to coal 
companies outside the State employing 
non-union miners will be let to Indiana 
coal companies. It proinises to be bit- 
terly fought by outside corporations which 
have been underbidding Indiana coal com- 
panies. According to legal advice, the bill 
will, if enacted, pass inuster before the 
courts. 



The Daily Tragedy. 

A press dispatch from Steubenville, Ohio, 
states that during the inspection of the 
Mingo Junction plant of the Carnegie Steel 
Company by James A. Farrell, president of 
the United States Steel Corporation, and 
thirty officials of the company, a delay was 
occasioned in the inspection until the 
body of Joseph Byers could be removed 
from an eighteen-inch roll, where the 
man had been crushed to death. After the 
removal of the body the roll was cleaned 
and the inspection of the steel officials 
resumed. 



It is reported that shipbuilding orders 
are almost impossible to place in the U. K. 
at the present time, owing to the difficulty 
of securing early delivery. Practically 
every shipbuilder is full of work until 
1914, and, naturally, with such a demand 
for new tonnage, high prices are quoted. 
The high prices and the late delivery to- 
gether are preventing business, and firms 
who intended placing orders have given 
up the idea for the present. In the mean- 
time companies in need of steamers are 
offering handsome profits to the firms 
who are fortunate enough to have vessels 
building, the profit in some instances 
reaching 50 per cent, over the contract 
prices. 



(By the Rev. Charles Stelzle.) 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




SEATTLE, WASH. 

■■'• ■•..'.. I ■■■ 



EUREKA, CAL. 



Ohio women lost their contest to 
have equal suffrage incorporated in 
the constitution of the State. 

A New York girl confessed that 
she smuggled eight saws in her hair 
to aid prisoners to escape from 
the Tombs. 

The number of women who will 
vote for President this year is now 
put at 1,346,925, as against about 
14.000.000 men. 

Maine will have five Presidential 
tickets to choose between. Repub- 
lican, Moose. Democrats, Socialists 
and Prohibitionists. 

In the last few weeks there has 
been unusual activity in timber lands 
in Oregon. It is estimated that be- 
tween $5,000,000 and $6,000,000 has 
been invested in Oregon timber, the 
larger part of which being eastern 
capital. 

According to a recent report given 
out by the Bureau of Census, De- 
partment of Commerce and Labor, 
the United States has a natural mili- 
tia of 20,473,684, the non-contiguous 
possessions of America, not enter- 
ing into the number given. All males 
between the ages of eighteen and 
forty-four years are considered as 
natural militiamen. 

The international boundary survey 
party, which has been marking the 
line between Alaska and the Yukon 
Territory, has completed the task of 
surveying the one hundred and 
forty-second meridian from the Pa- 
cific to the Arctic Ocean. At the 
north end of the line a bronze mon- 
ument was placed just out of reach 
of the highest waves, and smaller 
monuments were set every three 
miles. 

Thirty foreign countries, together 
with numerous colleges, scientific, 
and altruistic associations, will be 
represented in the fifteenth interna- 
tional congress on hygiene and 
demography, which will meet under 
the auspices of the government in 
Washington, September 23-28. This 
is the first time the gathering has 
been held in this country, the for- 
mer congresses having been held in 
European cities. 

In a recent article coming from 
Wall Street sources, it is asserted 
that there is a general improve- 
ment in the business of the railroads, 
as evidenced from the reports of 
forty roads for the period between 
the first week of July and the first 
week of August. These reports show 
an increase of 10 per cent, in gross 
earnings over the same period of 
last year. Traffic has been steadily 
improving, with moderate increases 
in all classes of freight. 

There will be at least ten miss- 
ing Senators and forty-three missing 
Representatives in the next Con- 
gress, on the basis of the present 
membership, regardless of what may 
be done in November toward in- 
creasing these numbers. Many 
members of the present Congress 
have already made their plans to 
retire on the 4th of March next, 
the majority of them because of 
unfavorable conditions in their 
States and districts, hut quite a 
number because they have grown 
weary of public life and are really 
anxious to lay aside its burdens and 
responsibilities. Of the ten Senators 
three are Democrats and seven are 
Republicans; of the forty-three 
House members nineteen are Repub- 
licans and twenty-four are Demo- 
crats. 



Residence Phone Ind. Green 185 School Phone Ind. A 4484 

MARSHALL'S 
Navigation School 



Day and Night 
REASONABLE TERMS 
204 Grand TiTUik Pacific Dock 



SEATTLE 



The Northwest 
Navigation School 

School closed for six months 

Will reopen November 1, 1912 

Applicants prepared for Master's, 

Mate's and Pilot's License of all 

grades. Ocean, coast and inland 

waters. Terms reasonable. 

CAPT. K SNELLENBERG, 
Graduate New York Nautical Col- 
lege; licensed master of ocean steam 
and sail vessels (unlimited); pilot of 
various inland waters; adjuster of 
compasses, 322 Globe Bldg., First 
Ave and Madison St., Seattle, Wash. 



Seattle Navigation Scliool 




THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 
UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 

SEATTLE. WASH. 



Headquarters For 

Union Made Clothing 

FURNISHINGS, HATS AND SHOES 
At 

WESTERMAN & SCHERMER 
220 and 222 First Avenue, South 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



Open the entire year, 
and In touch with 
latest requirements. 
Candidates thoroughly 
prepared tor License 
of any grade; Master, 
Mate or Pilot; Ocean, 
Coast or Inland, 



By CAPT. W. J. SMITH, 
Nautical Expert, 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical College, 
IJcensed Master of Ocean steam and 
sail vessels (unlimited), and Master 
and Pilot for Inland waters. Author of 
"Self-Instructor In Navigation," Author 
of "Practical Compass Adjustment." 
Compass Adjuster. 

507 MARITIME BUILDING 
911 Western Ave., SEATTLE, Wash. 

Phones: 
School, Main 3300. Res. Queen Anne 664 





smoke: 




The 


"Popular Favorite," the ' 


'Little 


Beai 


ty," the "Princess" and 


other 


high 


grade union -made cigar*. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 




532 


Second Street - - Eureka 


, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG 
Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, SarsaparlUa and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers In Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St. 

Seattle, Wash. 



Vernon W. Buck Arthur C. McLane 

Carl G. Benson 

BUCK, BENSON & McLANE, 

Lawyers and Proctors in Admiralty 

Free .Advice to Seamen. 

1265 Empire Building, 

Seattle, Wash. 

Vi tala og skrifva de nordiska spraag. 



Bonney-Watson Co. 

UNDERTAKERS 
3rd and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 
Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or 
telegraph promptly attended to 
Phone, Main 13 
Independent: Elliott 254 



ALASKA HOTEL 

Corner Western and Seneca 

The newest 2S-cent house in town. 

New building, new furniture. 

Special attention to mariners. 

FREE BATHS 

Special Weekly Rates 

P^TERDESMORE^ropri^^ 

Seattle, Wash., Letter Litt. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Poslofflce, letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to call 
or have their mall forwarded during that 
period, they should notify the Agent to 
hold mall until arrival. 



R. R. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squlre-Latlmer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



Alonzo, I. 
Anderson, P. T. 
Anderson, HJalmar 
Anderson, Fred 
Andersen, A. 
Anderson, Carl 

Anton 
Bachman, P. W. 
Bendlxon, Nick 
Berentsen, Alfred 
Blommendal, J. 
Borgen, H. O. 
Boyd. John 
Bell. Richard 
Bedat, L. 
Cashel, A. 
Carlson. Martin 
Oerty, Carl 
Christensen, Roy 
Chrlstensen, H. 
Cotton, John 
Dahl. John 
Davidson, Jakob 
Dennett, John 
Dylfivik, Elnar 
Denny. J. B. 
Enkhardt, Charley 
Erikson. Axel -732 
Erlkson, Edvard 
Evensen, Andrew 
Eriksen. E. 
Edwards. John 
Edson, Frank 
Krirkson, J. R. 
Foss, Louis 
Frost, H. 
Froderberg. R. 
Fichter. A. 
Gibbons, J. 
Ginis, G. 
Oouda. C. 
Gunderson. Olaf 
Gestgivar. Aug. 
Grahn. John 
Granberg, Fred 
fReg. Letter) 
Grunwald. A. 
Grant, Dave 



Hall, G. A. 
Holmberg. O. 
Hagberg. Gustaf 
Heynes, H. 
Hansen. Axel M. 
Holllns. Frank 
Iversen, Arthur 
Ivessen. I. 
Jacobson, Knut 
Johnson, Andrew 
Johanson, Einar 
Johnstone, Dick 
Johnsen, Oscar 
Jensen, L. 
Jorgenson, Oluf 
Johansen, Aug. W. 
Johansen. N. G. 
Jonsen. P. 
Johanson, O. K. 
Karlson. Jacob 
Kaas. Otto 
Kastelton, Frank 
King. Frank 
Kasgersen, Christ 
Kneblikoff, I. 
Kylander. H. 
Larson. E. G. 
Lewis. Geo. H. 
Lorin. A. L. 
Lafmore, P. de 
Lungquist. John 
Larsen. S. -1081 
Lee. C. A. 
Manlers. C. 
Maprnusen, Lars 
Mat.son, Mike 
MrManigal, T. E. 
Mfi.sland, Hans 
Mikael. J. 
Mdller. J. B. 
Muir. .Tame.s 
Millfr. Louis 
Marx. Tliorvald 
Maitak. M. 
McKlttrick, J. 
McCalllch. W. 
Nllson, A. G. 
Nilson. Alflns 



Nilson, P. L. 
Norrell, Oscar 
Nilsen, K. M. 
Naro, H. 
Nelson. Adolf 
Nilson, Frank 
Nordenburg. Johan 
()ehmich(!n, Fred 
Olsen, M. A. 
olsen. Nick 
illsson, Ernst 
Ofmlclien, Fred 
f)l.sen, Claus 
().«terberg, John 
Olsen. Edvln 
Olmholt, D. T. 
Pa.squin, A. 
I'etterson, A. -1223 
I'etterson, Hans 
Person, John 
Poderson, John 
Petterson, Richard 
Perdjuhn, W. 
Pedersen, Carl 
Powell, Gus 
Quigley, R. E. 
Rathke, R. 
Ratclifte, L. 



Race, Martin 
Saniuelson, Harold 
Sievers. John 
Suedarich. J. 
Spelman. J. 
Swenson, B. -l')32 
Soulg, Chas. 
Serwold. M. O. 
Steen. T. C. 
Sainsing. Carl 
Steen, Jens — 
Stange. Fritz 
Thune. H. 
Tuck. W. 
Tessner, R. 
Udley. Harold 
Waurich, R. 
Williams. Jack 
Waltemaht. J. 
Weber, Rasmus 
WImmer, Geo. 
Welfare. J. A. 
Zimmer, W. 

Packages. 
Borjensen. C. A. 
Miller. Louis 
I'etersen, Meyer 



Portland, Or., Letter Lint. 



Anderson, Erlck 

B. 
Anderson, Guss. 
.\nderson. Peder 
AndroUo, A. 
Anderson. Otto 
Aga. John 
Abrams. George 
Balda. Alfonso 
Bergstrom, Paul 
lilomgren, M. A. 
Brodig, W. G. 
Blakstad, Charles 
Bryant, WllUe 
Britton. Samuel 
Bochmann. F. 
Cooley. Howard 
Corty. C. 
Cordia, Peter 
Colman. E. 
Christensen. Peter 

C. 
Campbell. John A. 
Dennis. Charles 
Dorff. William 
Degroot, George 
Krickson. L. 
Kwanger, Nils 
Eugene, John 
Gwat. A. H. 
Grove. Al 
Oalleberg. Martin 
(Haas, Waldemar 
fJlannus. Alex. 
Heinas. Charles 
Helisten, Gus 
Homes. Salers 
Halvorsen, William 
Hiiltman. A. 
Hayden. Tom 
Haawe, Norwald 



Irwin, Robert 
.laase, Warren 
Johnson, Jack 
Johnson. George 
Johes. Harry 
Johnson. Chris 
Johnsen. Halvor J. 
.lohnsen, Ole 
Johnsen. John 
Jensen. Chris 
Johnson, Axel 
Johnson, H. 
Jensen. Robert 
Kaup, L. 
Kealer, James 
Kutsberg, Gustaf 
Larsson, John 
Lundqulst, A. 
Liedekrants, Fred 
Larsen, Engvald 
Lane, Charles 
Larsen, Soren 
Lemmel, Chas. 
Lerksher. Heinrich 
Martinsohn. Alec 
MrMalion, Jack 
Mathisen, Harry 
Mattheu. J. 
Macrae, Alexander 
Matson, Ellis F. 
Meyer. Dick 
Morris, Frank 
Moninger, Joseph 
Neuling, Geo. A. 
Normen, John 
Norman, Ludwig 
Olsen, Andy 
Olsen, Severln 
Ohlsen, Charles 
Ophelm. Lars 
Orlik, Joseph 



Herman Schulze 

-CIGAR MANUFACTURER - 
Cigars at Wholesale and Retail 

439 SECOND STREET 

Corner F EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD. Proprietor 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates 

Front Street, between C and D 

EUREKA, CAL. 



For 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 

or 

A SQUARE MEAL 

Try 
EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 
A. R, ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



AMERICAN EXCHANGE HOTEL 
Headquarters for Scandinavians 

OLUF KARLSEN, Proprietor 

GOOD BOARD AND LODGING 

By the Day, Week or Month. Meals 25c. 

First Street, between D and E 

EUREKA. CAL. 

Telephone Main 445 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

THE COSMOPOLITAN 

Furnlslied Rooms, Club Rooms, Bil- 
liard and Pool Tables. Reading Room 
with latest Swedish. Finn and Nor- 
wegian newspapers. 

BARBER SHOP 
125 D. St., Eureka, Cal. 

ED. SWAN SON, Prop. 



^^^>^'^^/^^^>^^*'^'<r'mf^JS^',^'^^^-^^^>^t,^^,^^^t^^>^%^^*^^»^S^>^>^ 



Peterson. Aage 
Pedersen, Rasmus 
Petersen, Peter 
Perouse, Andre 
Peterson, Maruets 
Pearson, Victor 
Rasmussen, Pete 
Rautio, Jacob 
Rennert, Fred H. 
Richter, Hans 
Rose. Luis C. 
Roche. John 
Sanders. Chas. 
Samuelson, Victor 
Srott. James 
Schmidt. Frits 
Smith. Ernest 
Srhulze. Max 



Sjoholm, Waldemar 
Stephen. M. 
Swensson, John B. 
Splnessen, Kurwald 
Sundberg. Karl 
Tamford. A. 
Thomson. T. 
Turner, A. 
Turner, F. 
Uadren, G. F. 
Wall, A. 
Weber, J. 
■Wennor. Edward 
Wold, Statius 
Wickstrom, Gustav 
Young, Herbert 
Zornbauer, Carl 
Zunk, Bruno. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

The Danish Consulate, 815 Mills 
Bldg., San Francisco, Cal., seeks in- 
formation concerning a Danish sailor, 
Mr. Paul Christian Hansen, called 
Poul Hansen, born in Copenhagen, 
Denmark, January 28, 1870. His 
mother in Copenhagen has not heard 
from him since February, 1902, when 
he sent a letter from San Francisco 
to her. 

Carl Herman Wesstrom, alias John 
Smith, aged 64, a native of Gothland, 
Sweden, last heard from at San 
Francisco, is inquired for by F. G. 
Klintberg, Point Reyes Life Saving 
Station, Cal. 

William Fayette White, whose 
mother died recently, is inquired for 
by his brother. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please address S. A. 
White, 106 W. Salem Ave., Roanoke, 
Va. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 
HUOTARI & CO. 

Gents' Furnishings, Boots and Shoes 

Groceries and Notions 
We sell everything, and sell at right 
prices. Union-made Goods Specialty 

You Know the Place 
320 S. F. St., near Sailors' Union Hall 

ABERDEEN, WASH 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service 

Phone 691 Stand: 

At Sailors' Union Office 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. IVI. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



ROYAL CIGAR STORE 

Headquarters for Union-made Cigars 

and Tobacco. Red Seal Cigar a 

Specialty. The Place to get 

your Sea Stocl<. 

Agency for Gloss Union Steam 

Laundry. OLE LUND, Prop. 

S. E. Cor. of Herron and F Sts., 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 
Abreast of Sailors' Union Hall. 



When in Aberdeen Trade at 
BEE HIVE. 

Very best union made Hickey Siiirts, 
Oil Clothing, Eureka Boots, Hats, Shoes, 
Underwear, Beddings, Tobaccos, and no- 
tions for seafaring men. 

JUKKA SAHLSTEIN 

304 South F St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

Near Sailors' Union Hall 

Open Evenings. 



THE PIONEER 

Union Made Cigars and Tobacco 

a Specialty 

Wholesale and Retail 

Pool and Billiards 

412 Herron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

G. L. WILLISCRAFT, Prop. 



Headquarters for 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods 

Boots, Shoes, Hats, Etc. 

ALEXANDER'S WHITE HOUSE 

403 East Heron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

next to Burnett's Jewelry Store 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 

FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively In Union-Made CIGARS, 
TOBACCO, ETC. Call at his old Red 
Stand on Water Street, Port Townsend. 
Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 
around the corner from the Union Office. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in LIVE 
STOCK, FRESH IVIEATS AND VEG- 
ETABLES. Shipping supplied nt 
lowest rates. :: Port Tovi^nsend, Wash. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Pres. 

Port Townsend Mercantile Co. 

(Inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED 
311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: 
Bartlett Wharf, Port Townsend, Wash. 



THE RED FRONT 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, ETC. 
Union Label Goods 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer In 

Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits 

315 Water St., next to Commercial Bank 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 

When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 




Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 




Boot and Shoe Workers Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



OLD TOWN, TACOMA, WASH. 

HTTliiALLEK 

2320 NORTH 30th STREET 

Notice to our Customers: This place will be known as the "Red Front." 
Seamen's Outfitters, Shoes, Rubber Boots, "Sawyer's" Oil Clothing, Flannel Shirts, 

Quiits, Blankets, Etc. 

"Boss of the Road" Overalls, 75c; Hickory Shirts, 50c; Everything Union Made. 

I will give you a square deal as I want your trade. 

Remember the "Red Front," one block north of Union Hall, Old Town. 



PORTLAND, OR. 

WM. JOHNSON 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 

For Quick Service Call East 4441. Resi- 
dence Phone Tabor 3. I give you a Claim 
Check for your baggage at home. Give 
me your work or we both lose money. 

Office: 
41 UNION AVE. - - PORTLAND, ORE. 

P. ROSENSTEIN J. G. WOOD 

Workingmen's Store 

Impdrters and Dealers in 
FINE CUSTOIVl AND READY iVlADE 

CLOTHING 

Gent's Furnishing Goods, Hats, Cap.s, 
Boot.s, Slioes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, Etc. 
23 N. 3d St., nr. Burnside, Portland, Ore. 

Tel. Main XL'115 ROSENSTEIN BROS. 

RAYMOND, WASH. 



MATES, AHOY! 

GO TO THE 

Union Cigar Store 

For your CIGARS, TOBACCO 
and SMOKING SUPPLIES, also 
COAST SEAiVIEN'S JOURNAL 

RAYMOND, - - WASH. 



Tacomot Wash., Letter Li»t. 

Anderson, Edward Jansson, John -2203 

-1739 Kesber, Karl 

Anderson, Albert B. Kirwan, Milton L. 

-1568 Knappe, Adolph 

Anderson, Max Loren, A. L. 

Bausback, Erwin Martin, Louis -1868 

Behrins, Emil Marikwardt, Carl 

Benson, Charles Munster, Fritz 

Bloom, Charles Nielsen, C. V. 

Buckland, Wm. Olsen, Martin 

Carson, James Peterson, F. 

Christensen, Albert Sovig, Martin 

Erikson, John Swanson, Ben 

Fors, Alfred Veekenstedt, W. 
Gronstrom, WilhelmWeerman, Wm. 

Grove, Albert Zornig, Arthur 
Gustafson, Axel 

Eureka, CaL, Letter List. 



Alexander, G. L. 
Anderson, Otto 
Benson, S. 
Carlson, Gust 
Christensen, O 
Prykln, Gust 
Gottberg, Henry 
Grant, John 
Gulliksen, Lars i 
Hansen, Hans 
Hansen, J. P. 
Hass, H. 
Horlin, Ernest 
Ivars, Cal. 
Jacobsen, Edy 
Johnson, A. 
Johnsen, Arthur 
Johnson, Halvord 
Jensen, Fredrlk 
Lane, Dick 
Larsen, K. L. 
Langevld, Emest 



Lindblom, Ernest 

Menz, Paul 

Menneky, Fred 

Nilson, Andrew G. 
M. Nilsen, Julius 

Ogren, Harry 

Olsen, C. 

Paludan, Chas. 
C. Pedersen, Paul 

Pedersen, Martin 

Petterson, Oskar 

Ramsted, A. 

Rawke, Fred O. 

Sinyard, Walter 

Thomas, Joseph W. 

Thompson, Andrew 

Thoresen, Jens 

Wacksmann, Hans 

Wilson, John 

Wallen, L. 

Zebe, Gustav 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Richard Ryan, who left the British 
steamship Candida at San Francisco 
in July last, is inquired for by the 
British Consui-General. 
heard from since, is inquired for by 
the secretary of the Marine Cooks' 
and Stewards' Association of the Pa- 
cific Coast, 51 Steuart St., San Fran- 
cisco. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Nik Gustof Svanberg Nelson, born 
in Roguna Jamtland, Sweden, 44 
years of age, light brown hair, blue 
eyes, dark beard, last heard of on 
Standard Oil Company's ship Mat- 
toppa, is inquired for by his sister. 
Miss Elise Svanberg, 3953 Twen- 
tieth street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Peter Iversen last heard from at 
the Marine Hospital, San Francisco, 
Cal., is inquired for by his sister, 
Hanna Lind, at Tacoma, Wash. 

William McGrail, of Baltimore, 
Md., who sailed on the Atlantic and 
Gulf Coasts as cook for a number of 
years, is inquired for by his brother, 
George McGrail, 603 Decatur street. 
New Orleans, La. 

The following men, who made 
the trip on the bark Annie Johnson, 
leaving San Francisco on March 21, 
1910, and were paid off at San 
Francisco on June 1, 1910, are in- 
quired for by the Matson Naviga- 
tion Company, San Francisco: Ed. 
Benson, Norway, 53 years, A. B.; 
Nils Johansson, Sweden, 56 years, 
A. B.; Angelino Probaste, Chile, 30 
years, A. B.; F. Sunence, Norway, 
34 years, second mate; R. Kurella, 
Germany, 45 years, carpenter; Her- 
man Johnson, Sweden, 32 years, A. 
B.; P. Allen, France, 40 years, A. B.; 
W. Ellingsen, Sweden, 21 years, A. 
B.; Axel Henriks, Finland, 27 years, 
A. B. The first three named men 
made the round trip and were paid 
off in San Francisco, and the last 
six were paid off in Honolulu. 

Andrew John Anderson, who left 
Aberdeen, Wash., on lumber barge 
Washtura for San Francisco, is in- 
quired for. Any one knowing his 
present whereabouts please notify 
Mrs. Anna Anderson, Aberdeen, 
Wash. 

Salvage money is due to the follow- 
ing seamen, who were members of the 
crew of the steamer Washtenaw, when 
assistance was rendered to a British 
vessel, Leicester Castle, off the east 
coast of South America, during Octo- 
ber, 1908: A. Nessrig, H. Hansen, C. 
Johansen, R. Lewis, C. Alsager, E. 
Erickson, R. Ross, C. Anderson, S. 
Anderson, W. H. Crane, S. Johnson 
and A. Bosbury. Apply to Manager 
Marine Department, Union Oil Co., 
San Francisco. 

Will any of the crew of the John 
Palmer on the voyage from Aus- 
tralia to San Francisco or Pacific 
Coast port last year please call on 
or communicate with F. R. Wall, 
324 Merchants' Exchange, San Fran- 
cisco, telephone Kearny 394? 



To prepare for the opening of the 
Panama Canal, the Coast and Ge- 
odetic Survey has made a thorough 
examination of the Pacific entrance 
to the waterway, and the charting 
of the harbor will be undertaken at 
once. 

The recent official trial trip of the 
German battleship Kaiser, which was 
launched at the Imperial dock yard 
at Kiel in June, 1911, showed that 
warship's average speed under forced 
draft over a measured mile was 23 
1-5 knots an hour. 

The Swedish Government is work- 
ing out a revised tarifT of pilotage 
dues, one feature of which is said 
to be that the dues will be calcu- 
lated according to the displacement 
and not, as hitherto, to the carrying 
capacity of vessels. 

The Cunard line has expanded the 
Daily Bulletin, published aboard its 
vessels at sea, into a newspaper of 
from twelve to sixteen pages, as de- 
mands for space require. News 
from all parts of the world is sup- 
plied nightly by Marconi Wireless. 

The United States engineers in 
charge of river and harbor im- 
provements will hold a public hear- 
ing in the Chamber of Commerce 
Building, New York, September 24, 
on the proposal to increase the 
width and depth of channels in New 
York harbor. 

Captain A. S. Rostron of the 
steamer Carpathia, which raced to 
the scene of the Titanic disaster last 
April and picked up 704 survivors, 
was the recipient of more honors in 
New York recently when the Life- 
Saving Benevolent Society presented 
him with a gold medal. 

Life-savers of the new Green Hill 
Station, R. ]., made a heroic rescue 
on August 19, of the crew of five 
men of the schooner R. L. Tay, 
lumber laden, from Bangor, Me., 
for New York, and wrecked off the 
Rhode Island coast. The Green Hill 
Station was opened August 1. 

The Submarine Wireless Company 
of Manhattan has been incorporated 
in the State of New York with a 
capital of $200,000 to engage in sub'- 
marine telegraphy and signaling and 
transmission of messages under or 
through water by means of sound 
waves, vibration, or other devices. 

The tugs Sonoma and Ontario, 
built by the New York Shipbuilding 
Company, Camden, for the Navy De- 
partment, have both made success- 
ful trial trips. The tugs are 185 
feet long and 35^ feet beam. Both 
developed a 14-knot speed at sea, and 
have been accepted by the Govern- 
ment. 

The British Admiralty will order 
an oil-carrying ship of about 10,000 
tons deadweight. She is to be driven 
by internal combustion engines of 
about 740 horsepower. This will be 
llic fifth oil-tanker owned by the 
British Admiralty, the others being 
(he Burma, 3,445 tons, Petroleum, 
9,900 tons, Isla, 980 tons and Kharki, 
1,430 tons. 

The new 50,000-ton steamship be- 
ing built for the White Star Steam- 
ship Company at the yards of Har- 
land & Wolflf at Belfast will be 
named the Britannic. It was an- 
nounced about a year ago that this 
ship would be called the Gigantic, 
but in reply to a letter of protest 
against this name after the Titanic 
disaster, J. Bruce Ismay stated that 
the name had not yet been decided 
upon and that it certainly would not 
be Gigantic. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




An Italian squadron has arrived off 
Beirut and another bombardment is 
feared. 

Grossly insulting articles attacking 
the United States are appearing in 
the Cuban press. 

The bad weather throughout Eu- 
rope is driving thousands of Amer- 
ican tourists homeward. 

The Mexican Government has can- 
celled the fishing concessions on 
Pacific Coast to Japanese company. 

Lieutenant Louis Chandenier, of 
the French army aviation corps, was 
burned to death while making a 
flight. 

It is reported from Paris that the 
Pope is about to create a new Amer- 
ican cardinal who will reside in 
Rome. 

S. . F. Cody, an ex-American, was 
awarded first prizes totaling $25,000 
for his achievements at the aviation 
meet on Salisbury Plain, England. 

An official report from the Cook 
Islands says leprosy is prevalent to 
a great extent. The lepers live in 
the most disgraceful conditions and 
the general health of the islands is 
deplorable. Drastic measures are 
necessary to save the population. 

General Count Maresuke Nogi, 
Supreme Military Councilor of the 
Japanese Empire, and his wife, the 
Countess Nogi, committed suicide in 
accordance with the ancient Japanese 
custom, as a final tribute to their 
departed Emperor and friend, Mutsu- 
hito. 

President Taft has given President 
Madero thirty days in which to pro- 
tect American property and lives in 
Mexico. If Madero fails to do this 
the United States will require that 
he immediately resign. If Madero 
should refuse to resign intervention 
will speedily follow. 

M. Fourny, the French aviator, 
competing for the Criterium prize 
oflFered by the French Aero Club, 
made a notable flight, but failed 
to equal the record set by Helles 
here last September. Fourny re- 
mained in the air thirteen hours 
•and eighteen minutes and covered 
a distance of 1010 kilometers (628 
miles). 

Belief in imminence of war is 
stronger in Sofia than in Constanti- 
nople, according to reports from the 
Turkish capital. The Porte does not 
believe the Bulgarian Cabinet will 
be carried away by popular clamor. 
The basis of this belief is the pro- 
gram of reform which the Porte 
purposes to grant to Macedonia and 
all other Christian provinces. 

All the great European powers 
have exercised their good offices in 
trying to arrange an understanding 
between Italy and Turkey on a basis 
which could be made the foundation 
for ofiicial peace negotiations. Both 
Italy and Turkey, it is understood, 
however, have declared that they 
would welcome the good offices of 
the United States rather than those 
of any other nation. 

A school teacher named Romenco 
swam thirty miles in the Caspian 
Sea in twenty-four hours and ten 
minutes, and at the enfl showed no 
undue fatigue, despite the strong 
wind and heavy sea with which he 
had to contend. He claims to have 
beaten the record of T. W. Bur- 
gess, the champion English swim- 
mer, who accomplished the journey 
between Dover and Calais last year, 
and has challenged the Britisher to 
a swimming contest in June, 1913. 



San Franciaco Letter List. 



Letters at the San Francisco Sailors, 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration ot four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail Is advertised In 
these columns should at once notify 
P. Scharrenberg, Headquarters Sailors' 
Union, San Francisco, to forward same 
to the port of their destination. 



Abel, P. 
Addlcks, H. 
Ahl, Elnar 
Alf 

Alltinson, S. 
Allen, J. M. 
Alterleabing, Dick 
Alver, Con. 
Ander, G. 
Anderman, E. 
Andersan, J. A. 
Andersen, C. 
Andersen, E. 
Andersen, John H. 
Andersen, N. -1549 
Andersen, -1S12 
Andersen, S. P. 
Anderson -1772 
Anderson, A. 
Anderson, A. P. 
Anderson, E. 
Baardsen, G. 
Baardsen, H. 
Baardsen. T. 
Baere, H. 
Barton, W. 
Bath. C. 
Bausback, B. 
Beausang, E. 
Beck, B. 
Beckel, B. 
Becker, Ch. 
Behnke, H. 
Behr, Henry 
Behrend, C. 
Bcirsen, A. 
Bengtson, M. 
Bengtsson. John 
Benson, G. 
Berglund, R. 
Bergman, E. 
Bergman, I* J. 
Berlin, W. 
Bergsten, R. 
Bernde, W. 
Bernhardsen, C. 
Berntsen, J. 
Beugh, L. B. 
Bianca, F. 
Birkelbach, W. 
Bjirk. G. 
Bjornstad, M. 
Campbell, M. 
Callan, J. 
Canon, E. 
Caplinger, O. 
Carlsen, C. 
Carlsen, -956 
Carlson, Chas. J. 
Carlson, M. 
Carlson, O. S. 
Carlsson, -876 
Carlstrom, A. 
Ceelan, J. 
Chaler, B. 
Chotarol, E. 
Chrlstensen, A. 
Dahler, H. 
nanielsen, S. 
Danielson, I). 
Daragher, J. 
Darwin, Richard 
Day lor, W. J. 
Dciberger, M. 
Devany, D. 
Eckart, G. 
Eeken, M. 
Eckers, R. 
Edgerton, J. 
Edlung, K. 
Edstrom, J. 
Edwards, D. 
Eganvr, N. 
Ehlert, A. 
Ek, C. 
Ekstrom, G. 
Ekwall, G. 
Ellingsen, B. 
Eliassen, E. 
Fabroski, T. 
Faulkner, J. E. 
Fell, Olaf 
FigA'ed, S. 
Fischer, P. 
Flemens, P. 
Forrest, Thomas E. 
Gabriesen, E. 
Gartman, H. 
Gasch, W. 
Giliholm, A. 
Gjardahl, S. 
Gjosund, P. 
Glase, G. 
Goodrlge, M. 
Gorgensen, A. 
Gower, J. 
Giauers, Gust. 
Gray, A. 
Gregory, P. 

Haak, R. 
Haggar, F. 
Haaland, E. 
Hiikansson, T. 
Haktin, E. 
Hallenberg, 
Halvasen. -1425 
Halversen, T. 
Halvorsen, H. C. 
Halvorsen, W. 
Hammastein 
Hannus, M. 
Hansen, H. 
Hansen, H. O. 
Hansen, H. P. 
Hansen. -968 
Hansen, J. A. .T. 
Hansen, J. M. 
Hansen, J. N. 
Hansen, L. P. 
Hansen, N. 
Hanson. J. P. 
Hanssen. -1867. 
Illman, T. 
Inberg, J. E. 
Ivcrdtsen, g. B. 
.Tackson, J. 
.lacobs, F. 
Jacobsen, F. 
Jacobsen, Ole 
Jacobson, J. 
Janoff, A. 
Janson, Fr. 



Anderson, Eric Axel 
Anderson, L. A. 
Anderson, M. 
Anderson, Otto 
Anderson, S. M. 
Anderson, S. P. 
Anderson, Tom 
Anderson, AV. 
Andersson, O. 
Andersson, -1738 
Andreassen, -1477 
Andreson, H. A. 
Andstrom, A. 
Anis. J. 
Antonsen. M. 
Appelquist, Otto 
Arbrlcks. A. 
Armstrong, T. 
Arnecke. -1649 
Arndt, M. 
Afp. G. L. 
Blachburn. G. 
Black, J. 
Black, W. 
Blikshaven, S. 
Block, B. 
Blomberg, G. 
Blucker, J. 
Blumel, W. 
Borgen, K. 
Borgesen, H. 
Bower. AV. 
Bov. -1715 
Bo ye. H. 
Bradley, A. 
Bragge, H. 
Brander, M. J. 
Brander, V. 
Brandt, F. 
Bredenbach, A. 
Bredberg, H. 
Brekke, H. 
Brennan, M. 
Brennar, L. 
Breslin, A. 
Brlggs, J. 
Bruber, H. 
Bruce. O. 
Bryde, Ch. 
Buaas, T. 
Buar. H. 
Bulb, E. 
Chrlstensen, H. 
Chrlstensen, L. P. 
Christiansen, O. M. 
Christophersen, F. 
Clausen, Ch. 
Clausen, J. 
Clever, H. 
Cooley. H. 
Connell, H. P. 
Connell. R. 
Corrigan, P. 
Coughlan, Ch. 
Cranby, J. 
Cronin. O. 
Crosigliv, J. 
Diller. Edw. 
Dobbs. P. W. 
Dobrick, J. 
Dockrell, W. 
Donelly, W. 
Douglas, K. H. 
Dracar, E. 
Durholt. H. 
Elmi, A. 
Egeland, Olaf 
Engelhard, F. 
Engstram, M. R. 
Erdmann, B, J. 
Erickson, G. 
Eriksen, K. H. 
Ericson. A. 
Erikson, Emil 
Evanger. N. 
Evans, E. 
Evensen, J. 
Evensen, M. 

Fors, A. 
Fox, R. 
Fredriksen. B. 
Fredrikstad 
Freman, 
Frieke, W. 
Fverg, M. 
Grondahl, -802 
Gronman, H. R. 
Gros. J. 

Groschefskle, F. 
Guddlng, A. 
Gueno. P. 
Gundersen. -785 
Gunter, M. 
Gusik, B. 
Gustafson, J. 
Guthre, R. 
Gwat, A. 
Gynter, J. 

Harjes, Albert 
Harrhorson, H. 
Hartog. J. 
Ha^e, J. 
Haugen, L. 
Hein, F. 
Henningsen, C. 
Henrlcksen, C. 
Hendricksen, -1333 
Henriksen, J. 
Henze, A. 
Herman.sson, -1622 
Heyne, H. 
Hilsen, Ingvald 
Hlltwood, A. S. 
Hinze, J. 
Holm, W. 
House, J. 
Houston, R. 
Hoye, H. 
Hubertz. EmIl 
Hutchison, S. C. 

Iversen, C. 
Iversen. R. 
IrV'in, R. 
Jennings, G. 
Jensen, -442 
.lensen, -2062 
Jensen, H. 
Jensen, J. E. 
Jensen, N. 
Jensen, O. 



Jeppson, P. 
Jespersen, M, 
Johannessen, -1485 
Johansen, A. H. 
Joliansen, -2021 
Johansen, -2094 
Johansen, Hans 
Joliansen, H .B. E. 
Johansen, G. W. 
Johansen, K. 
Johanson, -2186 
Johanson. Th. 
Johansson, -2050 
Johansson, B. 
Johansson, -9094 
Johnsen, Ch. 
Kahlberg, W. 
Kallos, J. 
Kalnin, E. 
Kane, G. 
Kaphluhn, F. 
Karlsen, L. 
Karlsson, E. 
Karp, F. 
Keiss, Li. 
Kelly, Th. 
Kesber, K. 
Keskulas, Johan 
Kiolman, J. 
Kieson, P. 
Kilpatrick, C. 
Kjarsgaard, H. 
Klassen, J. 
Kleppe, T. 
Klick, A. 
Laatz, O. 
Lagerberg, Pete 
Laizkowkl, A- 
I..ange, P. 
Larentzen, D. 
Larsen, B. 
Larsen, H. M. 
Larsen, J. 
Larsen, M. 
Larson, C. H. 
l>arson, Ch. 
Larson, F. 
Larson, G. 
Larson. N. E. 
Laurltson, M. 
Leckschas, H. 
Lell, Ch. 
Lepp, A. 
Lepsoe, I. 
Lerstem, J. O. 
Maatson, O. 
Machado, H. 
MacCourt, J. 
Madsen, Ch. 
Mainers, Ch. 
Mansen, A. 
Markmann, H. 
Markus, M. 
Martin, H. 
Martin, O. 
Martinsen, R. 
Martliiassen, N. 
Mathisen, L. 
Mathisen. O. H. 
Matsinger, W. 
Mayers, P. 
McFarland, J. M. 
McGahen, John 
Mclnnls, M . 
McKeowen, Th. 
McMahon, J. T. 
McPherson, R. 
Mehrtens, H. 
Nachtigall. H. 
Nell, J. O. 
Nelsen, -733 
Nelson, A. B. 
Nelson, Chaa. 
Nelson, B. 
Nelson, M. 
Nelsion. -1014 
Ness. J. S. 
Nichols, F. 
Nickaisen, C. 
Niederacher, L. 
Nielsen -1072 
Nielsen, C. 
Nielsen, B. 
OConnell, H. 
Oeierich, H. 
Ohlsen, -569 
Ohman. P. 
Oiansen, K. 
Olsan. W. 
Olsen, A. 
Olsen, B. 
Olsen, G. 
Olsen, -502 
Olsen, -823 
Olsen, J. 
Olsen, M. 
Olsen, Ole A. 
Packham, T. 
Paerson, N. 
Pagel, -1216 
Pajoman, -2093 
Palmeiro, A. J. 
Papeijoglon, C. 
Pearson, A. 
Pearson, J. 
Pedersen, C. 
Pedersen, G. 
Pedersen, J. 
Pedersen, M. 
Pedersen, O. 
Pemberton, D. 
Perkins, F. 
Perkins, P. 
Peron, Edmond 
Person, Ch. 
Petersen, Ch. 
Pettersen, -1419 
Quezada, E. 
Quigley. R. 
Rasmalen, O. 
Rasmussen, -497 
Rasmussen, E. 
Rasmussen, H. P. 
Rasmussen, J. 
Rassmussen. S. 
Rausche, Emil 
Riegel, W. 
Reinhold, Ernst 
Saastedt. N. 
Sane. Th. 
Sandset, O. 
Sandseter, P. 
.Santos, J. 
Savage, R. 
Schager, E. 



Johnsen -1081 
Johnsen, J. 
Johnsen, P. 
Johnson -2016 
Johnson, Alrik 
Johnson, -2231 
Jolinson, B. 
Johnson, Geo C. 
Johnson, W. 
Johnson, -1659 
Johnson, -1547 
Jonsen, -2213 
Jorgensen, A. 
Jorgensen, T. 
Josephsen, W. 
Juval, B. 
Klotzke, O. 
Kninilzer, A. 
Knoff, L. 
Knudsen, B. 
Knudsen. David 
Kohlmenter. 
Koloston, J. 
Korsberg, Volmar 
Koski, V. 
Krile. B. 
Kristiansen, C. 
Kristansen, J. 
Kristiansen, H. 
Kristoffersen, Olaf 
Kruger, -633 
Kruger. -934 
Kuhl, H. 
Kvalvik. Oscar 

Liejman, T. 
Lillelld. 
Lilbsti, J. 
Lindeman, E. 

O. 
Lindgren, A. C. G. 
Lindgren, G. 
Lindliolm, E. 
Link. A. 
Linrusi, J. 
Lipsek, Th. 
Ludvigsen, -1249 
Lundbeck. C. 
Lund, P. 
Lund, -699 
Lunde, Ole 
Ludewig, E. 
Lundgren, G. 
Lundquist. H. W. 

Melder, A. 
Meyer, E. 
Meyer, M. 
Michelson, J. 
Mikelson, C. 
Miller, W. 
Milos, P. 
Mlnter, 
Moberg, K. 
Moen, H. 
Moen, R. 
Moller, A. (Reg. 
Momson, D. 

Lr.) 
Monsen, A. 
Morris, O. 
Morrison, D. 
Mortensen, R. 
Muir. D. 
Munk, Ch. 
Murphy, J. A. 
Murray, E. 
Murphy, Michael 
Nielsen, L. M. 
Nielsen, N. P. 
Nielsen, O. 
Nielsen, P. W. C. 
Nielsen, W. A. T. 
Nllsen, A. 
Nolan, G. S. 
Norberg, J. A. 
Nordling, Ch. 
Nordstrom, E. W. 
Nordstrom, J. 
Norris, E. 
Norris, N. 
Nower, G. 
Nurgi, Peter 
Olsen, Oscar Efralm 
Olsen, P. 
Olsen, R. 
Olson, B. 
Olson. -562 
Olssen, Harry 
Olsson, ,1. 
Olsson, O. -910 
Olsson, -1101. 
Olsson -705 
Olsson -1104 
Olsson, G. M. 
O'Neill, J. 
Orsen, A. 
Petersen, Chas. 
Petersen, E. 
Petersen, -721 
Petersen, W. 
Peterson, R. 
Peterson, J. 
Peterson, -1389 
Pettersen, H. 
Petterson, A. 
Pettersson, E. 
Phillips, Geo. 
Piroise, E. 
Piterick, H. 
Pithsanen, V. 
Pittman, A. 
Pl(- .tner, A. 
I'las, M. 
Ponni, A. 
Posa. T. 
Puntll -1466 
Qulnn, Wm. 

Reinke, F. 
Reponen, Anton 
ResvoU. F. P. 
Riley, R. H. 
Rippe, R. 
Rivero, John 
Roche, J. 
Rosbeck, G. 
Rudberg, Chas 
Sohalenz, Ch. 
Schel, T. E. 
Schlachter 
Schevig. B. 
Schmidt. H. W. 
Schneider, H. 
SchreJ, G. W. 



Schroeder, E. 
Schroder, H. 
Schultz, F. 
Schulze, M. 
Schutty, J. F. 
Seehusen, C. 
Seego, A. 
Selander, G. 
Sergeys, M. L.. 
Servantes, L. 
Sievert, H. 
Simonsen, C. 
Simonsen, S. 
Simpson, L. 
Singleman, E. 
Singen, G. 
Sjogren, J. 
Skoglund, H. 
Smith, J. V. 
Temke, F. 
Thien, E. 
'I'hompsen, E. 
Thompson, St. 
Thompson, A. 
Thompson, C. 
Thoresen, J. 
Thorsell, Ch. 
Thorssell, F. N. 
Thorsen, J. 
Udekull, Ch. 
A'albu, H. 
Valeure, A. 
Valles, A. 
Walker, B. 
Walters. Albert B. 
Wambark, G. 
Weber, J. 
Wehrtens, H. 
Weidt. H. P. 
Wells, G. 
Welsen, J. 
Werner, Ch. 
Wesgaard, Jens 
West, H. 
Zechel, W. 
Zornquest, O. 



Sningle, W. 
Sorger, E. 
Spetteland, B. 
Stangelund, P. 
Stein, -2099 
Stenberg, G. 
Stengand, W. 
Steven, -2581 
Stinersen, H. 
Sting, Ch. 
Storm, Th. 
Strahdin. H. 
Strand, K. 
Sundberg, R. 
Sundholm, F. 
Svensen, A. 
Svenssen, J. 
Svenston, H. 
Syvertsen, H. 
Tronsen, J. M. 
Thorstensen, C. 
Tilge, S. 
Tillman, A. E. 
Toft, H. 
Tollefsen, A. 
Toll if sen, R. 
Tonneson, A. 
Tvevick, O. 

una, C. 
Veil, O. 
Venema, H. 
Vllhelmson, S. 
Wiberg, J. E. 
Wickstrom 
Williamson, W. 
Willman. G. 
Wind, J. 
Winther, Hans 
Wishker, E. 
AV'hite, G. 
Wolttr, H. 
Wolter, J. 

Zimmerman, F. 



PACKAGES. 

Apply to Secretary of Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific. 



Balda, A. 
Berlin, W. 
Blirhavn, S. 
Block, Wm. 
Burgquist, G. A 
Chrlstoffersen 
Evensen, M. 
Hall, G. A. 
Hansen, Kilmer 
Hansen, Karl 
Hartmere -1245 
Jenkins, Fred 
Jensen. -2110 
Johansson, C. 



Jorgensen, Oluv 

Kallberg, C. 

Marten, H. 

Melder, -2085 

Mersman. A. 
Olof Niederacher, Ludur 

Olsson, Carl 

Pedersen, J. -113S 

Prieberg, P. 

Rasmussen, E. 

Sullivan, John 

Sundhahnn, F. 

Thoresen, J. 
9094 Tupplts. 



Johnson, J. N., -2161Waltti, H. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN. 
San Francisco. 



Anderson, Andrew 

H. 
Buria, F. 
Corbett, Lawrence 

P. 
Eriksen, John 
Hammarin, Chas. F. 
Joliansen, Carl 
Johansen, Soman 

Johan 
Johanlson, Ernest 

O. 
Jonsson, Ellias 



Jonsson, W. 
Larsson, Aleck 

Hilmer 
Larsen, Julius 
Larsen. Lewis 

Bernhard 
Nielsen, Carl 
Roelf, J. 
Stromberg, Erlck 
Spooner, Soil 
Sandset, O. 
Thompson, Carl 



Aberdeen, Wcuh., Letter List. 



Andreson, -1283 
Andersen, Andrew 
Andersen, Thomas 
Alexander, A. E. 
Cheniiowskey, M. 
Cordia, P. 
Dickenson, Richard 
Forsgren, Karl 
Geiger, Joseph 
Gewold, M. O. 
Hansen, -2179 
Hakonssen, C. 
Holden, Olaf S. 
Hansen, Crist 
Hanssen, H. 
Herman, Axel 
Isaacson, -140 
Iverdtsen, S. B. 
Ingebrethsen, John 

A. 
Johannessen, J. H. 
Jenson, J. F. 
Janes, Harvey 
Johnsen, Karl 
Jensen, George 
Jacobsen, -1486 
Johannson, -2077 
Lindliolm, Charles 
Lundmark, Helge 
Larsen, Johan 
Laakso, Frans 
Lindroos, A. W. 
Luhrs. Ludvlg 
MacManus, Hugh 
Masuhr, George 
MacPherson, Robert 
Olsson, -966 
Oksanen, Juko 



Olsen, Carl, -545 
Olsson, Fred 
Omichen, F. 
Pentz, Otto 
Penly, Otto 
Rosenfeld, Paul 
Rasmussen, Pete 
Rasehlun, Franz 
Sundman, Emil 
Schantz, Harry 
Sihiuter, Paul 
Sundholm, Frana 
Siren, Frans 
Sinyard, A. 
Sharp, Robert 
Straschn, H. 
Sandy, Oskar 
Strom, -2340 
Strom, C. 
Somberg. John 
Siven, Wiktor 
Swensen, Edelman 
Schneider, H. 
Sandby, James 
Schevig, A. B. 
Ullappa, Kasti 
Vejada, -190 
Wahl, John 
Weber, Walter 
Wilson, P. S. 
Wold, Hans 

PACKAGES. 
Hansen, John 
Julius, P. 
Lehtinen, Kaarlo 
Pedersen, Peder 
Polison, Tom 
Uggla, Fred. 



MARINE COOKS' LETTER LIST 



Seattle, 
Adams, H. 
Andraca, Alf. 
Baker, J. 
Bailey, Wm. 
Barboner, G. N. 
Barker, A. B. 
Bridges, Noel 
Cahlll, John 
Champion, Eric 
Claer, Harry 
He Bruin, Tac 
Earl, A. 

Engstrom, Swan 
Flones, Fortunda 
Gandy, Jas. 
Gray, R. 
Hardy, Jack 
Howard, Jas. 



Wash. 
Kenealy, E. 
King. R. G. 
Mills, Geo. 
Meyer, Julius 
Mongan, H. E. 
McMullen, T. J. 
Nielsen, Peter S. 
Pestell, Stanley 
Piers, Claude 
Redfern, R. 
RoIIan, M. 
Smithers, J. 
Smith, Marcus 
Snieder, G. J. 
Stacy, Frank 
Thaver, Chas. 
Third, B. 
Tinoco, Joe 



THE HARBOR HOTEL 

Formerly "The Mohawk" 

132 EAST STREET 

Opposite Ferry 

STEAM HEAT, HOT AND COLD 

WATER IN EVERY ROOM 



Elevator Service Free Baths 

and a Large Reading Room 

Rates: 

$2.00 PER WEEK AND UP 

50c PER DAY AND UP 

T. L. SELCHAU P. N. NANSEN 

Proprietors 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORN EY -AT- LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 
a Specialty 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 

(THE GERMAN BANK) 

Savings Incorporated 1868 Commercial 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

(Member of the Associated Savings 

Banks of San Francisco.) 
The following Branches for Receipt 
and Payment of Deposits only: 

MISSION BRANCH, 2572 Mission St.. 
between 21st and 22nd. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, 601 
Clement St., corner 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, 1456 
Haight St., near Masonic Ave. 

June 29th, 1912: 

Assets $51,140,101.75 

Capital actually paid up in 

Cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent 

Funds 1,656,403.80 

Employees' Pension Fund 140,109.60 

Number of Depositors 56,609 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock A. M. to 3 
o'clock P. M., except Saturdays to 12 
o'clock M. and Saturday evenings from 
6:30 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. M., 
for receipt of deposits only. 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
$2 to $2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bells and Hot and Cold Water in 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager. 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front St. and Broadway, op- 
posite Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier 
400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c 
per night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 
month. Baths, Reading Room. Office 
open all night. Best place near 
waterfront. Investigate. 



HOTEL SANTA FE 

684 FOLSOM STREET 
Near Third Street 
100 all sunny furnished rooms. Elec- 
tric light, hot and cold water. Rates, 
25c to 75c per day, $1.50 to $3.00 per 
week. Baths. Phone Home J 4230. Open 
all night. 

Phone Kearny 2503 

HOTEL COLCHESTER 

259 East St., Cor. of Jackson 
Rates: 30c per Day up, $1.75 per 
Week up. 

Hot and Cold Water in E>ery Room. 
Free Baths and Showers. 

PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 

We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 
Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Union Label Paper and Envelopes 



UNITED STATES WATCH CLUB 

FINE WATCH REPAIRING 



E. F. COLLINS, Manager 
10 EAST STREET 



S. W. Corner Market 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Kelleher & Browne 

THE IRISH TAILORS 

716 MARKET— Opposite Third— 33 GEARY 

NEW FALL SUITINGS 

ALL SUITS ARE MADE IN OUR OWN 
SHOP BY SKILLED UNION TAILORS. 




SUITS TO ORDER 

C. BREINING, Marine Representative 



They are paid by the week. 
No piece w/ork. 

FROM $30.00 TO $50.00 



JORTALL BROS. EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 
206 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Dougia* 5348 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

Union-made Shoes 

HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING 

GOODS, ETC. 
Fair Prices. Reliable Goods. 

50 East St., and 4 Mission St., 
San Francisco 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



Furniture Moving by Motorcar 

San Francisco and 
Suburban Towns 



FORSMANN & HUSEBY 
55 Market St. Phone Douglas 4400 

Anchor House 

S. PETERSON. Prop. 

FURNISHED ROOMS 

Reading Room. Electric Lights. 
495 THIRD ST. San Francisco 

riione Douglas 5390 



Charles Olsen, No. 31, a member 
ol the Sailors' Union, is urgently 
iiKiuired for by his brother Chris- 
tian. Address Coast Seamen's Jour- 
nal. 

William Moran, who left Buffalo 
forty-two years ago, at the age of 
12 years, is inquired for by his 
sister. Address Mrs. Catherine Mo- 
ran Fossett, 421 Normal avenue, Buf- 
falo, N. Y. 

Charles Harold Allen, who has 
served as an apprentice in a British 
ship, age about 21 years, medium 
height, brown hair, last heard of in 
San Francisco November 9, 1911, is 
anxiously inquired for by his father, 
riease notify British Consul-General 
at .San Francisco. 

Nils Nielsen, No. 204, a native of 
.Norway, born 1862, on the Pacific 
Coast since 1892, was last in the S. 
S. Wilhelmina. Inquired for by Mrs. 
Lina Svensen, 852 Treat Ave., San 
Francisco. 

Will John O'Brien, Walter Sin- 
yard J. Halvossen, Fred Weber or 
W. Hansen, who were on the 
schooner "Albert Meyer" last Janu- 
ary when W. Blodsing got hurt 
leaving Santa Rosalia, please commu- 
nicate with F. R. Wall, attorney for 
Blodsing, at 324 Merchants' Ex- 
change, San Francisco. 

W. Kahlberg, No. 688, and C. Mon- 
sen. No. 1964, are inquired for at 
the Standard Oil Company's office, 
at San Francisco. 

Nils Johnson, who was wrecked 
in the American bark Oasis, Sept. 2, 
1887, is inquired for by W. F. Ho- 
hcnschild, Berkeley, Cal. 

Duncan Carmichael, a native of 
Glasgow, last heard of in San Fran- 
cisco about three years ago, is 
anxiously inquired for by his father. 
Address, Seamen's Institute, San 
Francisco. 

Fred Victor Ford, a native of Eng- 
land, aged 35, of medium height, is 
very anxiously inquired for by his 
mother and little daughter. Please 
notify British Consul General at San 
Francisco. 

Albert Smith, a native of Cork, Ire- 
land, who left the American ship 
John C. Meyer, on Feb. 20, 1911, 
is very anxiously inquired for by 
his wife. Please notify British Con- 
sul General at San Francisco. 



C. J. SWANSON 

CLASSY CLOTHIER 

HATTER AND FURNISHER 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

UNIFORMS 

Gold Braids and Gold Wreaths of 
All Descriptions 

119 EAST STREET 

Between Merchant and Washington 

SAN FRANCISCO - CALIFORNIA 

Phone Douglas 1082 
Home Phone C-3486 



^^^^^^■s^^^^^^^^>^^^t^^.^s^s^'^^^*^^^^^^*^<A^^>^*^*t^i^^^^ 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUfACTURERS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Douglas 1660 




AT 



JOHNSON'S 

2338 MISSION ST. 
San Francisco 



WW^^^^V^^^^WWV^'^VS^V>^W>^>i^WWV^^W\^ 



Honolulu Letter List 



Amundsen, Albert 
Albrecht, Clarence 
Bredsen, John 
Berthold, Willy 
Christensen, Theo- 

dor 
Douglas, Sam 
Darlin, Harry 
Dahlin, H. 
Ekstrom. Geo. 
Fredriksen, Rudolf 
Greenace. Charles 
Hahn, John H. 
Hansen. L. 
Holm, H. John 



Langer, Robert 
Lundquist, Alex, 
Matheson, Louis 
Munze, Dick 
McPherson, Louis 
Morgan, Hugh 
Nystrom, R. 
Norris, Ned 
Roos, B. 

Rosbeck, Gustav 
Simonsen, Fred 
Saunders, Wm. J. 
Slevert, Hermann 
Swanson, Martin 
Smith, John 




INFORMATION WANTED. 



Will August Eklund, Fred Weber, 
G. W. Schrej, or any other seaman 
who was on the Albert Meyer at the 
time W. Bladsing was hurt leaving 
Santa Rosalia last January, please 
communicate with F. R. Wall, 324 
Merchants' Exchange. 

W. A. Goodrich, who left the Brit- 
ish ship Puritan at San Francisco, 
February 6, 1911, is inquired for by 
the British Consul-Gcueral at San 
Francisco. 



It is reported from Albany, New 
York, that the recent dock strike 
.iKainst the People's Line docks re- 
sulted in the dock strikers securing 
an increase in wages and the dis- 
charge of all strike-breakers and all 
former employes reinstated. 

The Boston local union of Shoe 
Workers, No. 229, has increased over 
500 members since March 1. The 
Regal Shoe Company has made a 
union stamp arbitration contract with 
the Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 
covering their Milford (Mass.) fac- 
tory. This makes two of the four 
factories operated by the Regal 
Shoe Company union factories. 

Industrial Commission bill, which 
recently passed both houses of Con- 
gress, after going through the con- 
ference committee, has been signed 
by the President. The commission 
will consist of nine members, three 
of whom shall be employers, three 
from the ranks of organized labor, 
and the other three from other 
walks in life. No doubt the appoint- 
ments yvill be made in the immediate 
future. 

Agreeable to a compromise effected 
between the Senate Committee on 
Printing and the Plate Printers' 
Union a law was enacted by the last 
session of Congress whereby there 
will be a gradual installation of 
power presses in the Bureau of En- 
graving and Printing to execute a 
specified portion of the work of the 
Bureau. As a result of this law 
si.xtcen power presses have been in- 
stalled and are now in operation. 

The executive council of the Build- 
ing Trades Department, American 
Federation of Labor, at its recent 
session concurred in the action taken 
by the executive council of the 
American Federation of Labor in re- 
voking the charter of the Amalga- 
mated Society of Carpenters, and ac- 
cordingly the Amalgamated Society 
was removed from the roster of or- 
ganizations affiliated with the Build- 
ing Trades Department. 

.\n important victory has been won 
liy the United Cloth Mat and Cap 
Makers in New York. .After a con- 
ference lasting two days the repre- 
sentatives of the employers and the 
union reached an agreement for a 
Saturday half holiday the year round 
and free sewing machines for the 
operators. It has been the custom 
heretofore for operators to furnish 
their own machines and maintain 
them at their own expense, and the 
Saturday half holiday obtained only 
during June, July and August. This 
victory affects over 2,500 employes 
in New York and Brooklyn, and 
over 1,500 in other parts of the 
country. 

The celebrated Danbury Hatters' 
case, which will be remembered as 
resulting in the assessment of a 
$220,000 judgment against the Hat- 
ters' Union, is again on trial. When 
the above verdict was rendered an 
appeal was taken to a higher court, 
the latter court remanding the case 
for a new trial, and directing the 
manner in which the case should be 
conducted on the retrial. The higher 
court decided that the cons])iracy to 
Ijoycott the Loewe hats must be 
proven in each individual case, and 
not against the union as a whole, 
and upon this order a retrial of the 
case was made necessary. It is like- 
ly the case will be long drawn 
out. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 



Nerve. — Invalid — Is this a good 
place for the nerves? 

Proprietor of Health Resort — It is. 
Why, when I opened up here I only 
charged 10 shillings a day, and now 
I've got the nerve to charge 25. — 
Tit-Bits. 



Expert Approval. — "Can you tell 
me anything about the existence of 
a money trust that absolutely con- 
trols the circulation of funds?" 

"No," replied Mr. Dustin Stax. "I 
don't know of any such undertaking. 
But it's a mighty good suggestion." 
— Washington Star. 



No Chance. — "Now that you have 
become rich, I hope you will not for- 
get the people who were your friends 
when you were poor." 

"Oh, no, I'll not forget them. The 
friends a man had when he was poor 
never let him do that, however he 
may try." — Chicago Record-Herald. 



Icebergs of the Highway. — "It is 
an exceedingly good rule to require 
every automobile to have a horn or 
bell," said the cautious man. 

"Yes," replied Mr. Chuggins; "but 
we ought to go further and have an 
alarm clock on every brick wagon to 
keep the driver awake." — Washing- 
ton Star. 



Did His Best. — "Why did you emit 
that feeble yawp when our candi- 
date's name was mentioned?" asked 
the master of ceremonies. 

"Why," replied the conscientious 
man, "I am one of these delegates 
with half a vote. I thought maybe 
I was entitled to only half a cheer." 
Washington Star. 



Suspicious. — "My father talked me 
into taking this course in domestic 
science." 

"And how do you like domestic 
science?" 

"Well, it looks like ordinary kitchen 
work to me. If my suspicions are 
confirmed I shall drop the course 
and make father buy ine a $50 hat." 
— Washington Herald. 



Children's Accounts 

Tour children should be taught to 
save. Open an account for each of 
them to-day. Show them by example 
that you believe In a savings account. 

They can not start too soon. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

783 MARKET STREET, near Fourth 
San Francitco 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 
Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 
House, San Francisco, Cal. 
THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equip- 
ped with all modern appliances to illustrate 
and teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation in the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always In view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and is now. In addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and Its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how ignorant the seaman may be, even in the rudiments of 
common education. Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of Ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and In a 
comparatively short Interval of time. WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY 





Agent U. S. Government Charts and Nau- 
tical Publications, Hydrographlc and Geodetic 

H. J. H. LORENZEN 

12 MARKET STREET 

Comer of Sacramento and Market Streets 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Dealer in 

Watches Chronometers Clocks 

Solid Gold Goods Diamonds 



MARINE & FIELD GLASSES 

NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 

EXPERT REPAIRING 

Watches, Chronometers and Jewelry 

Rates Determined by Transit Observations 

Chronometers and Sextants Rented 



J. COHEN Sl CO. 



Baltimore ClotKin^ Co. 

72 EAST STREET, S. R, Next to SAILORS' UNION HALL 

Have Your Suit and Overcoat Made by Them. WHY? 
UNION LABEL IN COAT, VEST AND PANTS 

OUR CUSTOMERS ARE UNION MEN. WE SELL UNION MADE 

GOODS ONLY. 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 



When Drinking Beer 
See that this Lahel is 
on the Keg or Bottle 




\ 

AND 

Porter 



llnion 

MADE 

Beer 

^SS^o Of America rOxr* 

COPYRIGHT ftTRADE MARK REGISTERED 1903 



^^^^^^^»^^^^^.^v^^»s^v^s^NA^^vww^^w^^^w^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^v^^»^^^^%^/v.v^^s^s/^^ 



Bagley's Navy 
Plug 

A FINE CHEW 
Give It a Trial 



^B -"o Issnd CvDM^ngntg ol tin t-^ ■B 

|]DuaimitHRs,^^ab».iKTD(iiniaNAL I UIVIOIV 



I ^^^^ ^ ^SS^ '^^^^JrssA MADE 



le 




Eyes Examined Free 



Repairing Our Specialty 




Jamas Si. Sorensen 



JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 

715 MARKET STREET - - - Near Call Bldg. 

2593 MISSION STREET - - - Near 22nd St. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

The Largest Jewelry Store, with the Largest Stock, at 
the Lowest Prices 

ALL WATCH REPAIRING WARRANTED FOR TWO 
YEARS 



^^ m Jt ^"^"W^ YI^'W~^ ^^ ^** *^^* *^'^ Uht\ (in light 
^^^r^^lS Bi^I l~i r^L ^^^ ''^"^^ appears on the box in 



which you are served. 



Issued Dy Autbofi^of uie Cigar MaKers' ImerrulJonal'Unlon of America 

Union-made Cigars. 

(Zhi^ Snlif if;). Tm »>• cnn caiumd ItkMi Vn tm Iwn MM b)ra nCl-CbSS ttVMUK 

JICIIHROFTHCCICUUMEia'linUIIUTIOIUlUIIIONi/ A«viu. MaiullilJMlllcvateiltOtlaail' 

«<incfiiN1 ol Ibc MORAL MAT[SM«vl iMliUaUU WtUARI OT IXC dUfX Tkinfon M raoaMld 

IfKM Ciixr^ U ill SittAflnUirnMhout Um Myld 

^ AU Wtia^amu u«on Utu Libd irii ba puauUd aCfordinqtoUM 



HC (^Uit*u4. Pteadent. 



.«•«. yliKi./.xmSi/.tmu.y^-ittiy iXfB^SiiisCiflmli.: (JMiy <J«i^ 



A Well Stocked 

MEN'S AND BOYS' 
FURNISHINGS 
DEPARTMENT 

Offers Complete Lines and 
Good Values in Staple Brands 
of 

UNDERWEAR, 
HOSIERY, 
SHIRTS, 
COLLARS and 
ACCESSORIES 




Market and Sixth Sts. 
San Francisco 



LUNDSTROM HATS 

Are made in San Francisco and sold 
in 5 Stores: 

72 MARKET STREET 

1178 MARKET STREET 

605 KEARNY STREET 

2640 MISSION STREET 

26 THIRD STREET 

ALL UNION HATS 



^^A/^^^/^<'w^w^^^^/s^^■ws/s*'ws.*'v"><'v^■v^'v^<'v^l<^ 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

•THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



H. SAMUEL, 

Also known as Sam, 

610 THIRD STREET 

Between Townsend and Brannan Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Gents' Clothing 
and Furnishings 

Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Trunks, 
Valises, Bags, Etc., Boots, Shoes, Rubber 
Boots and Oil Clothing. Seamen's Out- 
fits a specialty. 

If you want first-class goods at the 
lowest market price, give us a call. Do 
not make a mistake — Look for the Name 
and Number. 



CJUfTBOSTQl 

OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 



SI 






FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXVI, No. 2. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1912. 



Whole No. 2192. 



BRITISH TRADE-UNION CONGRESS. 



The Forty-fifth Annual Trade-Union Congress 
of Great Britain opened at Newport (Mon.) on 
September 2. The attendance was the largest 
on record. 

About 500 delegates were present, represent- 
ing a membership of 1,971,109, an increase of 
308,976 during the year. This is the largest 
gain in a single year since 1890. 

The proceedings were inaugurated by a band 
concert lasting one hour. Then the Congress 
had its picture taken. 

Mr. Will Thorne, M. P., of the Gasworkers, 
presided. After a few formal words of welcome 
he introduced the Mayor of Newport, who ex- 
tended the greetings of the citizens. 

Several other addresses of welcome were 
delivered. Several replies were made on behalf 
of the delegates. The President then read his 
annual report. A brief discussion followed, 
and the report was adopted. 

The whole proceeding occupied exactly one 
hour and ten minutes. Then the convention 
adjourned for lunch. 

Reassembling at 2:10, the Congress elected 
a large number of officers and committees by a 
count of hands, and acted finally upon one of 
the most important questions before the labor 
movement of the country, namely, Industrialism 
or Trade-Unionism. 

At 4 o'clock the Congress rose for the day, 
and the delegates visited the Newport docks. 

The President's report dealt with the chief 
subjects of interest to the labor movement, in- 
cluding the dockers' strike, eight-hour day, 
education, Home Rule, registration and fran- 
chise, compulsory arbitration, Osborne judg- 
ment, political action, and the Insurance Act. 

b'ollowing are a few excerpts from the report: 
Home Rule. 

"The government of Ireland by this country 
since the Act of Union has not been at all 
creditable. After generations of coercion, after 
centuries of misrule, it is the great and burning 
(luestion of the hour. Millions of Irish men 
and women have been compelled to leave their 
own country to seek work in other countries. 
Thousands of the Irish have been sent to prison 
under many Coercion Acts passed by both Tory 
and Liberal Governments, and many have been 
cruelly persecuted in the interest of Irish land- 
lords. I hope that with the passing of the bill 
into law we shall see an end to that bitter feel- 
ing which has existed between the English and 
Irish races, and which was caused by the re- 
pressive actions of the British Government. The 
i)ill is being bitterly opposed by the Tory party, 
and not only are they opposing the bill in the 
House of Commons, but some of the leaders are 
inciting the Ulster people to open rebellion. I 
deliberately charge these men with being re- 
sponsible for the brutal and cowardly attacks 
made upon the Catholic Trade-Unionists and 
Socialists in the Belfast shipyards some few 
weeks ago. If the Government had done their 
duty those high-placed individuals would have 
been put where some thousands of Irishmen 
have been put for less violent language. I 
hope I am voicing the sentiments of all dele- 
gates at Congress when I say that we desire 
to see Ireland given the fullest form of social 
self-government, so that the Irish people can 
have opportunity to develop their own natural 



resources and work out their own economic 
and industrial salvation. 

Registration and Franchise Bill. 

''This bill was introduced on Monday, June 
17, by the President of the Board of Education. 
This bill will enfranchise about 2,500,000 wage 
earners, and remove many political inequalities 
and registration anomalies, but it does not re- 
cognize the bed-rock principle that organized 
labor has been fighting for since the days of 
the Chartist movement. What we demand is 
universal adult suffrage, abolition of plural 
voting, payment of returning officers' fees, all 
elections to be held on one day (that day to be 
n general holiday), proportional representation, 
and to make it easy to get on the register, cer- 
tificates of transfer from one town or district 
to another in case of removal. The maximum 
.illowed for election expenses should be re- 
duced to at least one-half. These reforms are 
our political charter, and we are glad that the 
bill goes some of the way to bring them into 
operation. The wealth producers must demand 
full political power for men and women as a 
stepping-stone towards industrial and economic 
freedom. 

Compulsory Arbitration. 

".\t the end of last session the Government 
intimated that in consequence, of the London 
transport workers' and other strikes, a bill 
would be introduced next year to deal with in- 
dustrial disputes. I would remind the Govern- 
ment that in 1906 the Congress rejected by a 
card vote a resolution proposing compulsory 
arbitration by a majority of 397,000; again in 
1907 it was rejected by a majority of 1,003,000; 
again in 1908 by a majority of 454,000; and yet 
again in 1909 by a majority of 1,000,000. If the 
promised bill materializes, and the Government 
bring in such a bill, I hope that organized 
labor will meet it with all the opposition pos- 
sible. Trade-unions do not want strikes, but 
we will not give up the right to choose the 
weapons we desire to adopt to win for our 
members better economic and industrial con- 
ditions. The price of liberty is eternal vigi- 
lance! 

Osborne Judgment. 

"The trade-unions (No. 2) bill was read a 
second time on Tuesday, August 6, and passed 
by a majority of 100. The bill is drafted some- 
what differently to the one of last year, but 
even now does not iirovidc for the reversal of 
the position trade-unions have been in since 
the final decision in the Osborne case, which 
reversal has been demanded at Trades-Union 
Congresses. In my opinion, a dangerous feature 
in the bill is that too much power is given to 
the Registrar of Friendly Societies. Other 
features arc that funds may only be used for 
political purposes if a vote of the union mem- 
bership is taken by ballot and a majority of 
members voting are in favor, and that payments 
by members in furtherance of political objects 
must be carried to a separate fund. Any mem- 
bers objecting to pay are entitled to claim 
exemption, and no member claiming exemption 
shall be placed under any disadvantage or ex- 
cluded from any of the trade-union benefits on 
account of his action. 

"The bill in no way concedes the right to 
trade-unions to use their own money in their 



own way, as may be provided in their rules and 
subject to a majority of their members being in 
favor. For effective political action, the less 
complicated the machinery the better. The 
unions would be well advised to consider care- 
fully whether in this bill there is any substan- 
tial increase to their present limited powers. 

"While not able to congratulate the shop 
workers on complete success in their fight on 
the shops bill, I am sure the legal half-day 
holiday and proper meal-times will bring to the 
mind of all shop workers the need of organiza- 
tion, political and industrial, to secure further 
success in their demands for better conditions 
of labor." 

The action of the Congress on the question 
of Industrialism or Trade-Unionism was a dis- 
tinct victory (a 2 to 1 victory, in fact) for the 
latter. 

The resolution on the subject is as follows: 

"That this Congress reaffirms the resolutions 
passed at its last two Congresses upon amalga- 
mation of the present trade-unions by indus- 
tries, and desires to record its appreciation of 
the efforts made by the Parliamentary Com- 
mittee and the gratifying response of trade- 
unions in the building industry, and urges 
upon the Parliamentary Committee to call con- 
ferences of the other unions in various in- 
dustries with a view of completing the instruc- 
tions laid down in the Newcastle resolution; 
furthermore, as a means of assisting this move- 
ment, it be an instruction to the Parliamentary 
Committee to inaugurate an educational cam- 
paign in favor of the amalgamation of exist- 
ing trade-unions by industries." 

An amendment was offered, as follows; 

"To delete all after the word 'Congress,' and 
insert 'Instructs the Parliamentary Committee 
to make efforts among the various trade-unions 
in the same trade or business to secure amalga- 
mation so that one union may cover any par- 
ticular trade or business, or failing this to 
secure the federation of all unions in the 
same industry so that there may be uniformity 
of policy and a time period of agreements.'" 

Judging by the applause (in the gallery) the 
original resolution was carried by a large ma- 
jority (in the gallery), but when the figures of 
the card vote were counted it was found that 
the amendment had been adopted by 2 to 1. 

Thus the matter now stands so that, instead 
of "amalgamation of existing trade-unions by 
industries," the Parliamentary Committee stands 
instructed to work for "amalgamation so that 
one union may cover any particular trade or 
business." The argument that carried the day 
against Industrialism was the same as that used 
in like circumstances, and with like effect, in 
the United States. 

A warm debate took place ujion the jiroposal 
to support the Trade-Unions (No. 2) bill, the 
purpose of which is to remove the disability 
caused by the Osborne judgment, and to per- 
mit trade-unions to make levies for political 
purposes. 

Mr. Joseph Havelock Wilson made the point 
that it would be better to support the Govern- 
ment in passing Home Rule, Welsh Disestab- 
'•r.hment and the Franchise Extension bill, as 

(Continued on Page 7.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



THE BANSHEE. 



When "Hawserlaid" Bill was a young man 
he made a number of voyages 'twixt Lon- 
don and Calcutta. It was a route much fa- 
vored in those days by sailormen aspiring to 
be thought top-notchers in their profession. 
Among all the white-winged clippers dotting 
the seas forty and fifty years ago, none were 
so stately and ship-shape, none so proudly 
rakish and gallant, as the East Indiamen that 
carried the baled wealth of the far Indies to 
the mart of London. Hence, to be known 
as a "Calcutta sailor" was a distinction im- 
plying superior dash and smartness; and 
especially superior skill in the various 
branches of the now well-nigh lost art of 
able-seamanship. 

If my memory serves me rightly, the sec- 
ond voyage that Bill made to Calcutta was 
in the old Hamadryad, one of Green's ships. 
Anyway, it was on the Hamadryad that Bill 
was shipmates with Dan Collins — "Curly" 
Dan they called him. A fine young chap 
was Dan; handsome, sunny-tempered, always 
ready to do a shipmate a good turn. He and 
"Hawserlaid" Bill soon became fast friends. 
They were both in the same watch, the star- 
board, and occupied adjoining bunks. And, 
surest token of forecastle friendship, they 
used a tin in common for their weekly al- 
lowances of sugar. 

In the silent watches of the night, 'neath 
the beaming stars of the tropics, watchmates 
exchange confidences with the abandon of 
schoolgirls. The settings of the scene, im- 
pressing on the mind a sense of remoteness 
from the workaday world on shore, make for 
comradery. Thus Bill learned from Dan 
that, about a month before joining the Ham- 
adryad, he had married "the sweetest girl 
in all the world," a seamstress five years his 
junior. Lizzie, the wife, was an orphan like 
himself, and was living with a widowed aunt 
in Stepney. Dan had left her a monthly 
allotment of his wages amounting to three 
pounds, leaving himself with only ten shill- 
ings a month for his own use. And as Dan 
dilated on each little incident connected with 
his courtship and honeymoon, a taste of his 
happiness seemed to find lodgment in Bill's 
soul. No wonder Dan was so sunny-tem- 
pered. Bill told himself. How could he be 
otherwise when the spell of love's young 
dream had made him immune against the 
ordinary cares of life? 

Two weeks after the arrival in Calcutta of 
the Hamadryad Dan received a letter from 
his wife in which she informed him that if 
all went well he would be a father before he 
reached home again. With the exultation 
and pride of a young husband and prospect- 
ive daddy Dan showed the loving missive to 
his friend, "Hawserlaid" Bill. It was on a 
Saturday evening, and Bill suggested that 
the good news deserved some sort of cele- 
bration. It was therefore agreed between 
the two friends that on the day following 
they should go to "Chutney" Jim and enjoy 
one of his famous curried chicken and rice 
dinners, with "fixin's" ; Bill to stand treat 
with tlie understanding that the baliy, if a 
boy, should be named after him. 

True to their program the two chums went 
to "Chutney" Jim's place on Sunday and did 
justice to a meal the likes of which can only 
be had in the home land of curry and rice. 
The dinner was topped oflf with real 4-anna 
cigars and arrack toddies. My, but there was 
some stvle to that dinner when contrasted 



witli the "poun'-an'-pint. slungullion" meals 
on the Hamadryad. There they were, dawd- 
ling like sahibs on wicker lounges 'neath the 
swaying punkah out on the back verandah, 
listening to the rhythmic droning of the pun- 
kah-wallah, which seemed to say, over and 
over again, "Sailor sahibs, one rupee. Sailor 
sahibs, one rupee." Yes, it was fine; but not 
a bit too fine for the happy occasion which 
they were celebrating. 

Of course, the conversation turned on home 
and wife and the expected addition to the 
family — that is, Dan's part of it. Bill's part 
was mostly that of the sympathetic friend 
and counsellor ; the forlorn bachelor who is 
at once envious of, and rejoicing in, his mar- 
ried chum's happiness. On one thing they 
were both agreed. The boy — for it was sure 
to be a boy — was not going to be a sailor. 
The sea might do well enough for such as 
they, but Dan's boy was going to be some- 
thing better ; that was settled right there and 
then. Lizzie would have something to say 
about that, of course ; but as she had a strong 
dread of the sea she would not be likely to 
object to a shore career for her son. Just 
think of it ! he might grow up to be a doctor, 
or a lawyer, or a member of parliament, or 
some such bigwig ! Dan's eyes grew shiny 
at the thought, and Bill looked so pleased 
that it was quite evident that he didn't re- 
gard himself as the rank outsider he really 
was. But then, every bachelor is potentially 
a father whose latent instincts, if they had 
free play, would eventually find concrete ex- 
pression in a home, wife and children. 

But pleasant dinners, like all other worldly 
pleasures, are shortlived at the best. Alas! 
that the worries of life we have always with 
us ; the joys only rarely, if ever. When the 
cigars had been disposed of, Dan and Bill 
took a stroll down along the Esplanade. 
Past Fort William and its picturesque 
grounds they sauntered on toward Cooley 
Bazaar. A couple of settees beneath a shady 
banyan tree looked too inviting to be passed 
by on a day when the humidity of the at- 
mosphere suggested the heaviness of a Turk- 
ish bathhouse. 

"Let's sit down here for a while before we 
go on board," said Bill, mopping his perspir- 
ing brow with a silk bandana, the while he 
flopped himself down on one of the settees. 

Dan was willing. A good dinner requires 
a good rest. Also, it was the local hour for 
a siesta. Which probably accounted for the 
drowsiness that anon stole over the pair. 
Anyway, Dan found himself dreaming of 
home, when he was awakened by something 
pressing against one of his hands. He opened 
his eyes and saw, sitting in front of him, a 
shaggy, black mongrel dog, wagging its tail 
and looking pleadingly at him with its soft, 
brown eyes. 

"Hello, Tray," said Dan, sleepily blinking 
at the intruder. At this the creature put its 
forepaws on Dan's knees, making all sorts of 
doggish manifestations of delight at the rec- 
ognition implied by the greeting. 

Dan, now thoroughly awake, jumped up. 
A puzzled expression crept into his eyes as 
he looked at the fawning dog. 

"Tray," he called softly, "Tray" ; and each 
time he uttered the name the dog jumped 
up at him in a very paroxysm of canine joy. 
Dan grew more and more perplexed. 

"Bill," he called at la.st to his slumbering 
chum. Bill sat u]) and took due notice of 
the capering dog. 



"Hello," he said, "where did you get that 
dog from ? He seems to know you, too." 

"Yes," replied Dan, slowly; "that's what's 
puzzling me. 'E's the dead himage of our 
dog Tray at 'ome. An', what's more, he 
answers to the name, too. If I didn't know 
that our dog was safe at 'ome with Lizzie 
I could swear 'twas 'im. But I know Lizzie 
wouldn't part with old Tray for the world. 
An' even if she 'ad parted with 'im, how 
d'you s'pose 'e'd ever 'ave got 'ere? It's 
most puzzling, though. Look at this," and 
here Dan pointed out all the marks of simi- 
larity between the newcomer and his dog 
Tray at home. 

"W^ell," said Bill, "it mayn't be so puzzling 
after all. Tray is a common enough name 
for a dog. an' lots of dogs look so much 
alike it's hard to tell 'em apart. Perhaps the 
poor brute has lost his master. Maybe you 
remind him of his master, just as he reminds 
you of Tray." 

All this time the dog was snuggling up 
against Dan's legs, cocking his ears every 
time the name Tray was mentioned, and 
seemingly following the conversation with 
almost human understanding. 

"What'll we do with 'im?" asked Dan, pat- 
ting the animal on the head in an absent- 
minded manner. 

"Let's take him on boarcl witii us," sug- 
gested liill. "We ain't got no dog on board, 
anyway." 

And so when the two friends presently 
made their way on lK)ard of the Hamadryad 
the dog accompanied them. Before the sun 
went down he had been duly installed as 
general mascot of the shij) — and his name 
was Tray thereafter, as those quaint-spoken 
old chroniclers of yore might have said. 

Three or four days before the Hamadryad 
was ready to sail for home Bill and Dan got 
some money from the skipper and went shop- 
ping in the native quarter of the city. Tray 
came along; for though he was a genial, hail- 
fellow-well-met sort of dog with everybody 
on board, he was generally trailing behind 
Dan, and in a doggish way making it plain 
that he considered the latter his rightful 
.naster. 

Dan bought a coujile of silk petticoats and 
scarfs for his wife and her. aunt. Bill 
bought a baby's rattle, a quaint-looking af- 
fair made of hand-carved ivory, showing 
idols, pagodas, palm trees, richly caparisoned 
elephants with howdahs on their backs, cres- 
cents, stars, etc. 

On their way back, as they were passing 
the custom house, they met the skipper. 

"Ah ; here y'are, Dan, me boy," said the 
skipper, cheerily, handing Dan a letter. 

Dan knew the well-beloved handwriting. 
It was from his wife. Seating himself on 
the steps of the custom house he tore open 
the letter and began to read. When he had 
finished he handed the letter to Bill with a 
curious wrinkling of the brows which did 
not seem to comport well with the occasion. 

It was such a letter as any young wife 
and expectant mother might have written to 
her husband. It was aflfectionate in tone 
throughout, relating lovingly how the writer 
and her aunt were busy in spare moments 
making baby clothes and such things. Inci- 
dentally a little neighborhood gossip was de- 
tailed ; wishes for hubby's health and happi- 
ness were expressed ; pretty prattle, such as 
only women can write, was tucked in here 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



"Sins Against Labor." 

During the closing liours of the recent 
session of Congress, Congressman H. Rob- 
ert Fowler, of Illinois, delivered a speech 
in the House, with the above caption as his 
text. He dealt with the history of the 
movements of men and showed himself 
to be a student of the labor problem. The 
closing paragraph of his address is here- 
with given : 

"The next great task for labor is a 
struggle for an equitable division of 
profits. While complete relief can not 
be expected to come all at once and every- 
wliere at the same time, yet it may be at- 
tained more readily by the enactment of 
wise laws directing the course to be 
pursued by both labor and capital. The 
world owes a duty to labor which has not 
l)een faithfully discharged by legislative 
l)<)dies in the past. In my opinion, Mr. 
Speaker, the time is now ripe for prompt 
action in this respect, for upon the success 
of labor depends the success of our insti- 
tutions of liberty and learning. The mighty 
Roman empire crumbled and fell because 
of her abuse to labor. Her playhouses of 
crime lie in mcmumental ruins to remind 
the world of the magnitude of her sins 
against labor. Let us take warning from 
this sad example and in the sweat of our 
legislative duties accord to labor a just 
recognition of its rights, so that it may 
have an equal chance in the race of life for 
prosperity and happiness. We owe much 
to labor. It is our staff of life. It is our 
storehouse of supply. Yea more — it heard 
the voice of God in judgment against sin, 
and answered the righteous sentence in the 
sweat of its face for the adequate supply 
of human wants. Indeed, Mr. Speaker, 
labor found man in the jungles of bar- 
barism and l)lood, conducted him safely 
through the winding, misty valleys of su- 
perstition and ignorance, pointed out the 
fruitful fields of knowledge, led him up the 
sober heights of judgment and reason, 
placed a crown upon his head, and trans- 
formed him into an intellectual and moral 
god." 



Victory for Trade-Unions. 

The new constitution of Ohio, which 
was submitted to the people for their ap- 
proval or disapproval, has been adopted by 
a large majority, save one or two pro- 
visions. The campaign against the adop- 
tion of the new constitution was vigorously 
conducted by big business people, and 
nearly all of the big newspapers of the 
State. In this patricular it is pleasing to 
note that the newspapers, to a very large 
extent opposing the constitution, did not 
have sufficient influence to turn the tide 
of votes from the people in sufficient num- 
bers to accomplish their object. Woman 
suffrage was defeated by a heavy vote, 
and one other provision is still in doubt. 
Some of the features in the new constitu- 
tion are the initiative and referendum, pro- 
viding that three-fourths of a jury may 
render a verdict in civil cases, abolition of 
capital punishment, empowering the Legis- 
lature to establish minimum wage laws and 
exercise a larger supervision over factories, 
the eight-hour day on public work, pro- 



hibiting the punishment of workers for 
violating injunctions issued in labor dis- 
putes, except after a jury trial, unless the 
offense has been committed in the actual 
presence of the court ; providing for a State 
printing plant, abolishing convict labor, etc. 
This gives Ohio an up-to-date constitution, 
and the State Federation of Labor exer- 
cised a powerful influence in securing the 
adoption of the new organic law. 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



Opens Children's Bureau. 

Miss Julia Lathrop, appointed by Presi- 
dent Taft as chief of the Children's 
Bureau, provision for which bureau was 
authorized by the present Congress, has 
opened a temporary office in the Depart- 
ment of Commerce and Labor annex. With 
the passage of the legislative, executive, 
and judicial appropriation bill in the clos- 
ing hours of the second session of the 
Sixty-second Congress, the salaries for of- 
ficers of the new bureau became available, 
permitting the work of organizing the 
Children's Bureau to proceed. This bureau 
is authorized to investigate and report 
upon all matters pertaining to the welfare 
of children and child life, and will especial- 
ly investigate the questions of infant mor- 
tality, the birth rate, orphanage, juvenile 
courts, de.sertions, dangerous occupations, 
accidents, and diseases of children, em- 
ployment, legislation affecting children in 
the several States and Territories, and 
such other facts as have a bearing on the 
welfare of children. Three appointments 
have already been made by Miss Lathrop, 
a private secretary, an assistant, and a 
statistician. 



Fight Is Started. 

The arrest of two American Federation 
of Labor organizers by the McKeesport 
police for distributing union labor litera- 
ture at the homes of the unorganized em- 
ployes of the United States Steel Corpora- 
tion is the manner in which the Steel Cor- 
poration gives notice that it will refuse to 
permit its employes to join a labor organ- 
ization. For some weeks organizers of the 
American Federation of Labor have been 
distributing literature printed in the various 
languages to the employes of the Steel 
Trust. Interest among these employes has 
been aroused to the point where evidently 
the Steel Trust fears that organizations will 
be perfected. The organizers were arrest- 
ed upon the pretext of violating a city 
ordinance, but the ordinance itself in terms 
does not prohibit the distribution of litera- 
ture in the manner which was adopted by 
the organizers. The men arrested were 
put in jail and when effort was made to se- 
cure their release on bail, the Chief of Po- 
lice at first refused, stating that no bail 
would be acce])ted, and that a fine of $50 
in cash had to be paid before the organizers 
would be released. However, upon the ap- 
pearance of an attorney the Chief of Po- 
lice changed his mind and bail was ac- 
cepted in the sum of $300 each, and the 
organizers were released after having been 
detained in jail about eight liours. At the 
hearing which followed shortly after, the 
police magistrate assessed fines of $10, the 
(Continued on Page 11.) 



International Seamen's Union of America, 570 
West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

Atlantic District. 

Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union, 51 South St.. 
New York, N. Y. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
Atlantic, 42 South St., New York. 

Inland Seamen's Union, Whitehall, New York. 

Harbor Boatmen's Union, 214 West St., New 
York, N. Y. 

Lake District. 

Lake Seamen's Union, 570 West Lake St., 
Chicago, 111. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Great Lakes, 71 Main St., BuflFalo, N. Y. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Union of Great 
Lakes, 55 Main St., Buflfalo, N. Y. 
Pacific District. 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 44-46 East St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
the Pacific, 91 Steuart St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of the 
Pacific, 51 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Alaska Fishermen's Union. 93 Steuart St San 
I^rancisco, Cal. '' 

United Fishermen of Pacific, Box 42, Seattle 
Wash. ' 

Bay and River Steamboatmen's Union, 51 
Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

AUSTRALASIA. 

^%^„«''^tef Seamen's Union of Australasia: 
29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S W 
1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N.' Z. 
Queens Chambers, Wellington N Z 
Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N Z 
Carnngton, Newcastle, N S W " 
Maritime Bldg., Melbourne,' Victoria 
Seamen's OflSces, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 
25 Arcade, Brisbane, Queensland 
^redge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 
Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 
Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland 
Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland, 
i^atriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Road, London, E 
Lngland. ' ' 

Hull Seamen's and Firemen's Union 1 Rail- 
way St., Hull. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, Dubois- 
straat 12, Antwerp, Belgium. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband. Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin P. O. 16, Germany. 

FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts Mantimes de France, Marseille, 11 Place 
de la Joliette. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Quay Videcog, Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Sjomands Forbund, IS Rosenberg gar- 
den, Bergen, Norway. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Kobenhavn, Toldbod- 
gade 15, Denmark. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, Kobenhavn, St. An- 
napalads 22, Denmark. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 

ITALY. 

Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Tiazza L. Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 

AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Boschetto 5, Austria. 

SPAIN. 

Federacion Nacional de Obereros de Mar de 
Buques v puerto, Barcelona Mayor, 44, 2, 1 
(Barceloneta), Spain. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad de Resistencia de Foguistas, Monte- 
video, Calle 25 de Agosto No. 219, Uruguay. 

ARGENTINA. 

Federacion Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



The Boot and Shoe Operatives of 
Great Britain have 30,439 members 
in their 50 branches, and £140,556 in 
funds. They paid last year £19,513 
in out-of-work pay. 

Owing to Government pressure a 
conference has been arranged be- 
tween the Tramway Employes' Un- 
ion and the Tramway Board at 
Wellington, New Zealand. 

The British Home Secretary states 
that 74 policemen have been injured 
in connection with the transport 
workers' strike, and of these 32 
liave had to be withdrawn from 
duty. 

It is stated that the land policy 
of the present government of Great 
Britain now includes a minimum 
wage for the agricultural laborer, 
and land courts to fix rents and 
terms of tenantry. 

Returns relating to unemployment 
were furnished to the German La- 
bor Department by 52 trade-unions, 
with an aggregate membership of 
2,113,855. Omitting branches which 
failed to make returns, the member- 
ship covered was 2,053,767, of whom 
35,138, or 1.7 per cent., were stated 
to be unemployed at the end of 
June, 1912. 

At the end of 1911 the total 
membership of the 1,168 registered 
and unregistered trade-unions known 
to the British Board of Trade 
was 3,010,346, an increase of no less 
than 23.3 per cent, as compared with 
a year ago. This is the greatest 
annual rate of increase recorded dur- 
ing the period for which comparative 
figures are available (1892-1911), the 
highest previously attained being 
13.9 per cent, in 1907. 

The mechanical and industrial de- 
velopment of the Canadian province 
of Saskatchewan during the past few 
years has been rendered possible by 
the introduction of an army of wage 
workers, and the various economic 
problems attendant upon the influx 
of this body of workers from all 
parts of the world has made neces- 
sary the establishment of a Bureau 
of Labor. The Act under which it 
was created received the assent of 
the lieutenant governor on March 
23, 1911. 

According to returns supplied to 
the Danish Statistical Ofifice, 4.5 
per cent, of the 97,000 members of 
trade-unions reporting were unem- 
ployed at the end of May, as com- 
pared with 4.0 per cent, at the end 
of the preceding month, and 7.6 per 
cent, a year ago. The average num- 
ber of days lost owing to unem- 
ployment during May was just over 
one per member of the unions re- 
porting, as compared with 1.2 in the 
previous month and 1.7 in May, 
1911. 

All emigrants landing in Canada 
between March 1 and October 30 
must possess $25 (£5 4s.), and 
children $12.50 (£2 12s.) each (and 
between November 1 and last day 
of l-ebruary $50 (£10 8s.) and $25 
(£5 4s.) respectively), and sufficient 
traveling money, except that the fol- 
lowing need have sufficient traveling 
money only: (1) Farm laborers and 
female servants, if going to assured 
employment as such, (2) competent 
laborers going to assured permanent 
employment at railroad reconstruc- 
tion work, if they arrived between 
May 1 and September 30, 1912; and 
(3) certain relatives of residents in 
Canada. 



Cannon's Clothing Store 

Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

Special Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

Men's Suits Made to Order 
515 FRONT-516 BEACON STS. .... sAN PEDRO 



M. BROWIN 

THE SAN FRANCISCO CLOTHING STORE AND OUTFITTER 

EXCLUSIVE AGENT FOR 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

427 RROINT SXWEET SAIN F»t2DRO 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Angeles Beers 
All goods sold at lowest San Francisco prices. We buy direct from Kentucky 
Distilleries and our California Wineries. Seafaring men invited to Inspect our stock. 
Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

SEAFARn^GnMESrafr"^^ 

S. G. SWANSON 

641 SOUTH BEACON STREET 
Next door to postoffice. Los Angeles "waterfront," 

SAN PEDRO, CALIFORNIA 

Is the man to see when in line for High-Class 

Union Label TAILORING to order only 

SATISFIED CUSTOMERS IS OUR BEST ADVERTISEMENT 




•G/8TER* 



UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 

When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 



him. Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



WILL BE A MOTHER TO YOU 
Fix your clothes, sew the rips, re- 
pair the tears, fasten the buttons, etc. 
We really clean your clothes by our 

French Dry Cleaning Process 

which is entirely different from the 

mere "sponging and pressing" method. 

We Call and Deliver 

The French Dye WorKs 

612 BEACON STREET 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Martin Olsen, height 6 feet, weight 
225 pounds, missing since Christmas, 
is inquired for by Riggers' and 
Stevedores' Union, Steuart and Fol- 
som streets, San Francisco. 

John Moen, born 1878 in Norway, 
height 6 feet, is inquired for by his 
father, John Olson Moen, of Lansing, 
Iowa. 

Ole Jenson Lovig (sometimes writ- 
ten Oluf Jenson Lovig), a native of 
Norway, born at Stavanger, Hogs 
ijords; about 54 years old; height, 5 
feet, 9 inches; weight, about 170 
pounds; light complexion; blue eyes; 
last seen at Vancouver, B. C, in 1905. 
Any one able to give any information 
kindly communicate with his brother, 
Jonas Lovig, No. 2414^ 30th St., 
Tacoma, Wash. 

Charles S. Barker, born near St. 
Peter, Nicollet County, Minn., wishes 
to hear from his father, Charles Wm. 
Barker, who left Brookings County, 
S. D., for Oregon, and was going 
sailing again in 1889, and was last 
heard from in Coos County, Ore. Is 
fond of hunting and trapping; has 
been master; sailed out of New York 
City and Boston. Age about 80; 
height about 6 feet; bald headed, 
eyes gray, hair dark. 



San Pedro News Co. 

sixth and Beacon Streets, San Pedro, Cal. 

Dealers In 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Agents 

Harbor Steam Laundry 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



The United States Shipping Com- 
missioner at Philadelphia, Pa., re- 
quests the following named seamen to 
communicate with him: Gust Leyrle, 
arrived at Philadelphia, October 2, 
1908, on ship Dirigo; Gustav Mattson 
and Victor Wilson, on schooner 
Ciiarles Davenport, March, 1911. 

George Albert Vaughan, aged 47, 
of Handsworth, Birmingham, Eng- 
land. Was in New York city in 1902; 
worked as steward on New York and 
South American boats. Important. 
Address, Rev. R. C. Cookson, 96 
Monroe street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Herman Bjorckbom Eknas, a na- 
tive of Finland, born 1874, is inquired 
for by his orother Evert. Address, 
Sailors' Union, San Francisco. 

Alexander Benson, native of St. 
John, N. F., last heard of in Canada, 
now supposed to be on the Pacific 
Coast, is urgently inquired for by his 
mother. Address, Mrs. A. Benson, 
King's Bridge, St. John's, N. F. 

John West, who was on the 
steamer Horatius in June, 1912, is 
inquired for by P. Ivers, River Dar- 
ling, via Wenthworth, Australia. 
Please notify Sup't., No. 1 State 
street. New York. 

The United States Shipping Com- 
missioner, at New York, is desirous 
of locating the relatives or heirs of 
James Clark, a native of Maine, born 
1854. The deceased has a balance of 
$41.10 due him. 



San Pedro Letter Lut. 

.\Mlro.»cn, Karla Maltson, J. -13)18 

Aninell, Albert Markwardt, Carl 

Anderson, E. -1762 Murphy, Ambrose 
Anderson, Otto -1738Matlsen. Hendrik 

Anderson, Gust Marx, Thorwald 

Andersen, Peder Mellerup, Jens 

Alver, G. Matsen Hemming A. 

Airo, Oscar Nordstrom, J. 

Anderson, A. Nordman, John D. 
Anderson, C. -907 Nyhagen. J. -770 

Andersen, Ben. Nilsson, Eduard 

Andersen, Charles Nilsen, Hans. H. 

Anderson, J. -1099 Nilsen, Anders 

Anderson, C. G. Nelsen, C. J. 

-1420 Nelsson, E. -522 

Rredesen, John Nessenberg. F. 

Berg, H. Y. Nutman, Harry 

Bedford, A. Nielsen, P. W. 

Bjerk, Gus Neuling, Albert 

Bulander, B. B. Osterberg, Carl 

Brander, W. Olsen, Wm. 

Behrens, E. A. Olsson. Hans 794 

Bergman. B. Olssen, H. -714 

Bloom, Frank A. Olsen, Martin 

Bodahl, Hans -1746 Ouchterlonv, F. 

Berggren, O. -1889 Olsen, O. P. -1141 

Boardsen, S. Owen, Fred 

Bentsen, Hans Olsen. George 

Boardsen, Ed. Osterhahn, J. W. 

Broders, Hajo Peterson, K. E. -903 

Buchtman, F. Peron. Edmund 

Conners, Jack Petterson, Viggo 
Clausen, J. -1322 

Carlsson, A. -1220 Pettersen. Erick 

Christensen, H. P. Peterson. Henry 

Erikson, Oskar Peterson, Olof (Reg. 
Edgerton. Jack Lr.) 

Eichel, ErIck Pedersen. Peder 

■Ellingsen, Eduard Potet, Emile 

Edwards, Walter Peterson, P. -386 

Erlckson. Edward Peterson, J. 

Fasholz, D. Petersen, Oscar 

Freeling, Chas. Peterson, Loul 

Faulconer, Bert Pedersen, Julius 

Glasse, Gust. Retal. F. O. 

Gelger, Joseph Rantman, R. 

Gotz. Rudolf RIsbeck. Gustav 

Gustafson, J. Reuter. Chas. 

Gouda, C. Roy. George -1715 

GroszewskI, Fritz Repson, E. 

Hansen, N. -989 Rasmussen, Rasmus 

Hjort. Knud Remerd. J. 

Hansen, C. -1910 Rouvie, Mlkko 

TIellnius, Oscar Rutter, Fritz 

TIannus. Alex Swensen. C. E. 

II.Tlto, Walne Shonke, Frank 

TTeyne. Herman Sundholm. Frans 

Iloft. Hans Stammerjohan. Hans 

Hakonsen, John Schmlt. Chas. 

Hansen. Berger Samuelsen. Wictor 

Hendenskog. John Selversen. Chas. 

Irbe. Andrew Stangland. Peter 

Ingebretsen, Ingolf Sorensen, J. 

.Tones, Auber B. Sandstrom, O. H. 
Jones, Harry -1810 

Jones, Arthur Simpson. L. C. 

Jersh, Billy Schulze, Max 

Johnson, Johny Selklng. Ben 

Johansson. Nils L. Schramm. Arthur 

.Tohnsen. Gunnar Sellers. W. 

Johansen, John Schafer, Ernest 

Jensen. J. Frank Signard, Walter 

Johnson, Arthur Schmld, John -2579 

.Tohanssen. Fritz Schmld, F. 

Johnson, Oscar Stenberg. Alfred 

.Tnhnsen, Walter Schmidt. L. -2492 

Johnsen. Nels SassI, Wllhelm 

.Tohnssen. C. -2016 Swanson. Rueben 

Johanssen, Knut Scott. Ed. 

HJ. Sorensen. Michael 

.Tacobsen. John Sandstrom. Ivar 

Kern. Max Thorn, Arvid 

Kimeral. Herman ToUefsen. R. 

Kilman. Gunnar Togersen. Peder H. 

Karlsnn, R. Torbjornsen, Andrew 

Kuhne, W. Thompsen, Anton 

Kerleau. Alex Tamlsar, Peter 

Kaphluhn. Franz Thorngren. Chas. G. 
Kosze, Franz (Reg.Thorsen. J. 

L.) Thomsen, Alex 

Larsson, John Togersen. Anton 

TJndroth, Gust Tougel. R. 

Lauritsen, George tltby, Carl 

Lynd, A. Wlkstrom, W. (Reg. 
I..undmark, Helge Lr.) 

Larson, Martin -1710Wlkstrom, William 

Lewis. George H. Weber, W. 

Lewis, Fred Wll.son. Harry 

Llndeman, Otto Wllemson. Hans 

Lalne. Axel V. Werner. E. 

Larsen, Martin Ward, H. 

Ludviksen, A. -1249 Zoe. Francois 

I^ange, Ingolf de Zomlng, Arthur 

T-ang, Charles Zlckman, A. -2021 

LJungberg, Herman Younggren. E. 

Mark, Frank Packages and Photos 

Mikkelsen, Peter Haggar, Robert 

Markman, H. Mlklleit, E. 

Mauchada. Henry Johnson. Olle -2210 

Mayors. Paul M. Schroeder, Ernst 
MoGuIre, Owen T. 



^S^/>A^^«^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^WWN/S^%'^'V»WS^^S^ 



YOU NEED NOT BE BROKE 
WHEN IN SAN PEDRO 

I buy and sell new and second- 
hand goods that have any value. 

I also do Gun and Locksmithing, 
Upholstering and Mattress Making. 



N. MANN 



335 BEACON STREET, San Pedro 

Near 4th Street 



A^A^A^^^AAA^AAA^^^^^^^S^^^^^N^^^N^^^^^ 



INFORM^kTION WANTED. 



Emanuel Nyreen, a native of Abo. 
Finland, was member of crew of 
revenue-cutter Dexter, in 1908. Please 
communicate H. H. Rohrbach, New- 
ton Theological Institute, New Cen- 
ter, Mass. 



ftor. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



The expensive job on the boilers and engines 
of the United States mine planter Armistead 
will come to Mare Island early next month, 
according to an announcement made at the 
navy yard. 

That a new direct passenger steamer service 
between England and the Pacific Coast via 
Panama will be one of the outgrowths of the 
canal's opening, is the belief of E. J. M. Nash, 
managing director of the Royal Mail Steam 
Packet Company. 

John Clary has been appointed master of the 
schooner Rosella, vice Julius Baker; Ambrose 
Daley of the schooner Fidelity, vice Henry 
Hansen; David Mathison of the schooner J. J. 
Stofen, vice John Nilson. The steamer F. S. 
Loop. H. O. Levinson master, has been en- 
rolled for the coasting trade. 

B. T. Madden has been appointed master of 
the steamer Belvedere, vice J. H. Madden; John 
S. Smith of the steamer Atlas, vice J. C. Dart; 
John W. Justen of the steamer James S. Hig- 
gins, vice John Swanson. The steamer Green- 
wood, James J. Rudden master, has been en- 
rolled for the coasting trade. 

United States Supervising Inspector John K. 
Bulger on September 20 suspended the license 
of Captain H. C. Armstrong, master of the 
steamship Pleiades, for sixty days, for allowing 
his vessel to set in at least twelve miles inside 
of her course, resulting in the steamer strand- 
ing near Cape San Lazaro on_ August ISth. 

C. P. Jensen has been appointed master of 
the steamer Fifield, vice Carl Schillinsky; Bern- 
hart Anfindsen of the steamer Francis H. T.eg- 
gett, vice C. F. Hall. The schooner Henrietta 
W. .Anders, F.mil Andersen master, and the 
steamer Belvedere, J. H. Madden master, have 
been enrolled for the coasting trade. 

Customs Inspector Henry Gallagher and 
Robert Donaldson, assistant marine superin- 
tendent of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company, 
were indicted by the Federal Grand Jury at San 
Francisco on charges of conspiring with David 
Powers and Einil K. Fiedler to smuggle 600 tins 
of opium from the steamship Siberia last De- 
cember. 

.As one of the exhibits at the Panama-Pacific 
Exposition in San Francisco, the old schooner 
Hiram, with one exception, the oldest vessel 
of America afloat, is to be fitted out at Boston, 
Mass., and will leave shortly on her long trip 
to the Pacific. The Hiram was built at Bidde- 
ford. Me., 93 years ago and has been in active 
service ever since. 

Whaling looked better than codfishing to 
certain members of the crew of the schooner 
Galilee, the former South Sea trader, which ar- 
rived at San Francisco on Septemlier 18, 
eighteen days from Bering Sea, with 90,000 
codfish to the Union Fish Company. .According 
to Captain Nelson, five of his crew left the 
schooner and joined the whalers Unimak and 
Kodiak, which were operating off Yucatan in 
August. 

The American yacht Edris. which left New 
York December 12 last on a voyage to San 
Francisco by way of the Straits of Magellan, 
put into the harbor of Valdivia, on the Chilean 
coast in a damaged condition. The Edris. which 
is a fifty-three-ton steel au.xiliary schooner 
yacht, is owned by Captain John Barneson of 
San Francisco, and at one time was attached to 
the mission work carried on by Dr. Grenfell in 
Labrador. 

It is probable that the amount the city of 
Richmond (Cai.) will be asked to vote in bonds 
to start work on the new municipal inner har- 
bor under plans laid down and recommended 
by the United States Army engineers will be 
at least $500,000. The harbor complete will 
cost $1,975,000, but engineers have made esti- 
mates showing that work can be done with the 
first $500,000 that will be of vast benefit to the 
development of the city. 

Rear-Admiral Cottman, commander of the 
Pacific reserve fleet, has received word that 
there will be no mobilization of warships in 
San Francisco Bay next month, as originally 
planned by the Navy Department. While no 
reasons were given, it is thought that the 
scattering of the war vessels in different parts 
of tlie Pacific Ocean would make mobilization 
impracticable at this times. Also, enough men 
to man the war vessels are unavailable. 

Considerable discussion is heard concerning 
the lack of proper salvage facilities at San 
Francisco. With the exception of the White- 
law Wrecking Company, which operates the 
wrecker Greenwood and provides salvage tackle, 
there are no other companies able to undertake 
a distant salvage job. The only available vessel 
to assist in raising the Newport was the Salvor 
and she had to make a long run of 4000 miles 
from the north to Panama. She was sixteen 
days on the voyace. 

The revolutionary troubles in Nicaragua have 
comi)leteIy demf)ralizcd the movement of freight 
at Cnrinto, the ])rincipal harbor on the Pacific 
Coast of the Central American Republic, ac- 
cording to advices received by the foreign 
trade department of the Chamber of Commerce. 



The information comes from Captain Follette 
of the Pacific Mail steamer San Jose, who re- 
ports to his owners, under date of September 
17th, that there are 11,000 tons of cargo de- 
layed at Corinto and that the port is entirely 
blocked. 

With the ending of the season the work ot 
the revenue cutters in the north is closing, 
and within a short time all will be on their way 
to their home ports in waters far south of 
Bering Sea. The Thetis is the first to leave, 
now being on the way to Honolulu from Valdez, 
and should arrive about the 1st of October. 
Next down will be the Manning, to be fol- 
lowed later by the Tahoma, which should get 
away from Unalaska by October 5th. The 
Tahoma is making the last cruises to the Seal 
Islands and .Attn. 

Advices from London say many orders are 
being placed at British shipyards for steamers 
to ply to the North Pacific Coast via the Pan- 
ama Canal. Shipping men realize that with 
the opening of the canal the peaceful struggle 
between England and Germany for the world's 
markets will enter into a new phase, and to the 
fact that British shipowners are preparing to 
make a bold fight to prevent the canal traffic 
from falling into German hands is due that 
English shipbuilders have received more orders 
than they can fill for two or three years. 

Customs Collector Frederick S. Stratton has 
requested John D. Spreckels to pay a tonnage 
duty of $4116 on the Spreckels yacht Venetia, 
in accordance with the requirement that all 
foreign built yachts must pay a duty in pro- 
portion to their tonnage. Spreckels suggested 
that it might be well to wait for the decision 
of the LTiiited States Supreme Court in a case 
now before it. in which the constitutionality 
of the tax is at issue. The matter was sub- 
mitted to the Secretary of Commerce and Labor, 
who will await the Court's decision. 

-Another new Harrison liner is about to enter 
the service between Europe and this coast. 
The Crown of Seville, which has been recently 
launched, is scheduled to steam from Liverpool 
September 21 for San Francisco. The new 
steamer, which was built at Glasgow, is 445 
feet in length, 56.3 feet beam and 39 feet depth, 
and of about 5800 tons gross. The vessel is 
especially designed for her owners' Eastern and 
Pacific trafle and is fitted with twin masts with 
a bridge between the two foremasts and a 
complete outfit of derricks, including a heavy 
derrick to lift a weight of thirty tons. 

There was something more than the desire 
to remove a menace to navigation in the dyna- 
miting of the derelict schooner Lillebonne in 
the bight at North Head, near Point Bonita. 
\ small dose of the explosive rent the hulk 
asunder sufficiently for those in the speculation 
to reclaim whatever brass and copper may 
be in the old-timer. The wreck lies well up 
on the beach and is no longer a danger to 
navigation, as she was for two days and nights 
when she drifted around the bay and in and 
out of the Heads without any attempt being 
made on the part of the authorities to remove 
the grave danger. 

Cable advices state that the well-known 
schooner Endeavor, previously reported as go- 
ing ashore near Suva, has been sold as she 
lies on the reef for $1750. The Endeavor was 
owned by George E. Billings of San Francisco. 
With a cargo of lumber for Suva, the familiar 
windjammer sailed from Vancouver the latter 
part of July She is a vessel of 485 tons net, 
built at Port Blakeley in 1897. Coasters have 
been having hard luck in the South seas this 
season. The schooner Expansion, from Grays 
Harbor for Valparaiso, recently put in at Ta- 
hiti, and the schooner Sophie Christenscn was 
at the same port a few weeks ago in distress. 

With the charter of two more big carriers 
the Government has added to its fleet of coal 
steamers from the -Atlantic to the Mare Island 
(Cal.) Navy Yard. The latest fixtures include 
the steamer Texan of the .American-Hawaiian 
Company's line and another steamer of 7000 
tons dead weight capacity. For October loading 
the Texan gets a rate of $7 and for September- 
October loading the other vessel is receiving 
$5.34. The Texan is American and the second 
carrier of British registry. The Government 
fleet now en route from the Atlantic to the 
Golden Gate consists of the British steamer 
Ockley, from Newport News; and the British 
steamers Strathcarn, Strathdene and Strathlyon 
from Norfolk. The British steamers in the 
coal fleet are already under charter for outward 
loading. _ In this trade a great number of 
".Strath" liners have come to this coast to carry 
lumber to the Orient and Australia, the British 
colony trade drawing most of them. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 
and 
INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' FED- 
ERATION. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an offi- 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims 
of all seafarers careful attention. 324 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg., Third Floor, California St., near 
Montgomery. Telephone, Kearny 394; Home, 
C 3832. 



THOS. A. HANSON, 
570 West Lake St.. Chicago, III. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. T., 51 South St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON. Mass., 1%A Lewis St. 
PORTLAND, Me.. 377A Fore St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway. 
NORFOLK. Va., 221 Water St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Conti St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La.. 535 St. Ann St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 4 South St. Telephone 1879 

Broad. Night Call 8374 Spring. 
New Yoric Branch, 400 West St. Telephone 5153 
Chelsea. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 258 Commercial St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La.. 53 St. Ann St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway. 
MOBILE. Ala., 4 Contl St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION OF NEW YORK 
AND VICINITY. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 214 West St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKES DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, 111., 570 West Lake St. 

Branches: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND. O.. 1401 W. 9th St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis.. 133 Clinton St. 
TOLEDO, O., 54 Main St. 
N. TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O.. 992 Day St. 
ERIE, Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St.. East. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, III., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 
PORT HURON, Mich.. 517 Water St. 



MARINE FIREMEN. OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO. N. Y.. 71 Main St. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O., 1185 W^. Eleventh St. 
CHICAGO. III., 445 La Salle Ave. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St., East. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis.. 151 Reed St. 
SUPERIOR. Wis., 1814 Fourth St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
BAY CITY. Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St.. Tel. Seneca 2295. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O., 1401 West Ninth St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 151 Reed St. 
CHICAGO, 111., 314 N. Clark St. 
ASHTABULA, O.. 74 Bridge St. 
TOLEDO, O., 54 Main St. 
DETROIT, Mich.. 7 East Woodbridge St. 
PT. HURON, Mich.. 517 Water St. 
CONNEAUT. O.. 922 Day St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
N. TONAWANDA, N. Y.. 152 Main St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY. Mich.. 108 Fifth Ave. 
ERIE. Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, III., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 44-46 East St. 

Branches: 
VICTORIA, B. C. Old Court Rooms, Bastion 
Square. 

VANCOUVER. B. C. Labor Temple, Cor. Homer 
and Dunsmulr, P. O. Box 1365. 

TACOMA, Wash., 2218 North 30th St. 
SEATTLE. Wash., 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 65. 
PORT TOAVNSEND. Wash.. 114 Quincy St.. P. O. 
Box 48. 

ABERDEEN. Wash., P. O. Box 6. 
PORTLAND. Ore.. 51 Union Ave.. Box 2100. 
EilRlOKA, Cal., 227 First St., P. O. Box 64. 
SAN PEDRO. Cal.. P. O. Box 67. 
HONOHTLU. H. T.. Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts., 
P. O. Box 314. 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



*^^* 


ON THE GREAT LAKES. 

Contributed by the Lake Seamen's Union 




1 1^ 

V 

1 



MEN VERSUS GOLD. 



'JMie Lake Carriers' Association is an or- 
fjanization of shipowners, represented by 
the managers of the various allied shipping 
concerns. The managers operate the ships 
for money profits. Each seeks to increase 
the income of his ships to the very high- 
est level, and to keep expenses at the 
very lowest. The margin of income over 
and above expense represents profits, and 
this, in turn, represents the degree of 
success with which the manager will be 
credited by the stockholders. 

The money received for carrying cargoes 
is the main source of income. Therefore 
the manager seeks high freights. The 
greatest item of expense is that of labor 
cost. This the manager aims to keep as 
low as possible, in various ways: (a) by 
opposing the formation of labor organiza- 
tion, thus keeping the seamen separated 
and preventing concerted action ; (b) by 
reducing the wages when it is safe to do 
so, that is when men are plentiful and 
have no organization with which to protect 
themselves ; (c) by reducing the total num- 
l)er of men employed without reducing the 
total amount of labor required, thus com- 
]ielling more work from each individual 
without increasing wages; (d) by increas- 
ing the size and speed of the ships without 
increasing the number of men employed 
on the ships. 

Briefly stated, these methods for keep- 
ing down (he labor cost involve longer 
hours and short pay for the workers, 
greater profits for the stockholders, and 
higher salaries and commissions for the 
managers. The Lake Carriers' Association, 
l)eing composed entirely of shipowners 
rc])resented by managers, stands for the 
interests of such managers, and it is there- 
fore against anything that will interfere 
with high freights and low labor cost. 

Standing in opposition to the Lake 
Carriers' Association is the Seamen's Un- 
ion. It is an organization of men who 
work on the ships. Every seaman desires 
better wages and improvements in work- 
ing conditions, in order that he may live 
reasonably and with some degree of com- 
fort. The Seamen's Union, being com- 
posed entirely of seamen, stands for what 
the seamen want and need. It has no 
other reason for existence. Its .success 
can only come from the success of seamen, 
since it is made up of nothing but the 
men themselves. Therefore the Union 
stands for higher wages, better living and 
w-orking conditions, larger crews, and 
shorter hours of labor, with greater safe- 
guards for life and limb. 

Thus the Seamen's Union, organized to 
advance the interests of seamen, finds 
itself opposed by the Lake Carriers' As- 
sociation which represent^ the interests of 
cai)ital invested in ships. 

ft is human values and interests, rep- 
resented by the workers, opposed by pure- 
ly financial or business values and in- 
terests represented by employers — the 
Union of Seamen opposed by the Lake 
Carriers; labor struggling against capital; 
men fought by dollars; humanity versus 
gold. 



Every seaman must line up with one 
side or the other. He should stand on the 
side of labor, of men, of humanity, and 
help to secure better conditions of life for 
himself and his fellow workers. If he does 
not do this, he must, though perhaps 
blindly and unknowingly, give himself 
bodily over to the side that stands for 
nothing except dollars, and those dollars 
for a few shipowners only. 

There is no middle course on the Great 
Lakes now. The seaman must join the 
Union and thus make it possible for him 
to assert his rights and the rights of his 
comrades, or, as a non-unionist, alone and 
defenseless, he will be used against himself 
and against his own kind. 

V. A. Olander. 



SCHEME AGAINST SEAMEN'S BILL. 



The I^ake Carriers have deternuncd 
upon a desperate move to prevent the 
enactment of the Seamen's bill. Notice 
has been served to the effect that non- 
union sailors and firemen will be brought 
to Washington in November, and taken 
before the Senate Committee to oppose 
the improvements proposed by the bill. 
The startling announcement on this sub- 
ject was made to the Senate sub-com- 
mitttee which has the bill in charge, by the 
attorney for the Great Lakes' shipowners, 
Harvey D. Goulder, of Cleveland, O., rep- 
resenting the Lake Carriers' Association. 

When the representative of the Seamen's 
Union was contending at the sub-com- 
mittee hearing, that remedial legislation 
to regulate hours was needed to protect 
the seamen on the Lakes, Goulder sud- 
denly interrui)ted by saying: "As a mat- 
ter of fact I deny that absolutely, and will 
bring the men here to show that that is 
not true." Again on the same subject, 
objecting this time to the proposed three- 
watch system for marine firemen, Goulder 
said to the committee: "It is absolutely 
opposed to the practice we have always 
had on the Great Lakes, and I am pre- 
pared, if you will give me an opportunity, 
to bring the men to this hearing to show 
that our practice is absolutely satisfactory, 
and is the best way to deal with the 
question in that particular trade. T will 
bring the men to show that, the practical 
men." 

The Lake Carriers complained that not 
sufficient consideration was being given 
the matter although the bill was intro- 
duced in June, 1911, and did not pass the 
House of Representatives until August. 
1912. While Attorney Goulder was voi- 
cing this complaint one of the Senators 
asked him a question and the following 
colloquy occurred : 

MR. GOULDER— Premature action is 
action without consideration. I was ob- 
jecting. Senator Martin, against this per- 
emptory action on this bill. I am pre- 
pared with reference to the Great Lakes, 
upon reasonable notice, with fair oppor- 
tunity, to bring here actual men to be 
afTected. who will tell you the exact sit- 
uation. 

THE CH.AIk.MAX— Wiiat men do you 
mean ? 

MR. GOULDER— I mean the firemen, 



the seamen, the captain, the manager, and 
everybody else who could be afTected by 
this bill. 

There can be no mistaking that lan- 
guage. It shows plainly what the Lake 
Carriers intend to do. The non-union 
sailors and firemen, who have submitted 
to the notorious "Welfare" scheme, are 
now to be used against themselves and 
for the benefit of the shipowners. 

The Lake Carriers will pick out a few 
men suitable to the needs of the ship- 
owners, take these men to Washington, 
and there make use of them to block the 
efforts now being made to secure improve- 
ments for all seamen. Is it possible that 
the non-union men, now that they know 
the truth, will tamely submit to such 
practices? 

V. A. Olander. 



CANADIAN SHIPPING NOTES. 



The amalgamation of all the leading 
steamship companies operating on the 
Great Lakes has now been completed, with 
a capital of £2,000,000, one-sixth of the 
stock being held by Messrs. Furness, 
Withy t't Co. through the British Maritime 
Trust. .'\ director of the Grand Trunk 
Pacific Railway of Canada is also a mem- 
ber of the board of the new combine, 
which comprises the Richelieu and Ontario 
Navigation Companies of Canada and the 
United States, the Niagara Navigation 
Company, the Niagara River Line, the 
Northern Navigation Company, the Inland 
Lines, Ltd. (and subsidiary companies), 
the Thousand Island Steamship Co., and 
the St. Lawrence River Steamboat Com- 
pany. It is understood that ne.gotiations 
are now in progress with a view to the 
acquisition of the smaller concerns, so as 
to make the chain coiriplete. A clear route 
will now be established through all the 
Great Lakes from the head of Lake Su- 
perior to Montreal, where the agricultural 
produce of the west and northwest will be 
transhipped to the Furness steamers and 
brought across the Atlantic to Liverpool, 
Manchester, and Hull. The new arrange- 
ment will also, it is believed, prove a 
powerful factor in the competition be- 
tween Canadian and Ignited States ports 
for the control of the grain traffic, though, 
naturally, the closing of the St. Lawrence 
to navigation from November until April 
will interfere considerably with its water- 
borne transport. But the succe.ss of this 
great scheme depends to a large extent 
upon the progress made with canal con- 
struction in the Dominion, though, accord- 
ing to all reports, the Government is de- 
termined to push forward the deepening 
and widening of the Welland Canal, which 
connects Lake Erie and Lake Ontario, and 
with the construction of the waterway 
frcin Georgian Bay, on Lake Huron, to 
the St. Lawrence. Another project of the 
kind contemplated is the cutting of a canal 
from Lake Superior through the Lake of 
the A\'oods. Lake Winnipeg, and thence 
by the Saskatchewan River to Edmonton, 
where it would be joined by other canals 
in connection with the Peace River and the 
Lakes of the Northwest. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Carrying a crew of more than twenty 
and five passengers the steel steamer 
James Gayley was sent to the bottom of 
Lake Superior in about 600 feet of water 
early on August 7, during fog, by the 
steamer Rensselaer. All the passengers 
and members of the crew were saved and 
put on board the Canadian steamer Stada- 
cona, which was close by when the col- 
lision occurred. The property loss will be 
by far the heaviest of the season and will 
probably reach $300,000. The Gayley was 
valued at about $250,000 and had a carry- 
ing capacity of 6000 tons. Her cargo of 
hard coal was insured. The lost boat was 
a duplicate of the steamer F. H. Good- 
year, of the Mitchell fleet, which was sunk 
in Lake Huron in a collision with the 
steamer J. B. Wood two years ago. This 
is the third season that Captain John 
Mitchell has operated without insurance, 
and this is the first serious accident that 
any of his boats figured in. 



The coal freight situation has lately 
shown very little change; there is more 
big tonnage in the market than the ship- 
pers can handle. Small carriers are scarce 
and cargoes of that class for side ports are 
moved with much trouble. With a good 
car supply some of the shippers look for 
a better movement next month. Dispatch 
is slowing up and coal carriers are spend- 
ing more time at the Upper Lake port 
docks. Some grades of coal are moving 
a little more freely from the receiving 
ports, but a number of the docks are pret- 
ty badly crowded. Lumber cargoes are 
offered more freely and boats are placed 
as fast as they get around on the basis of 
$2.50 from ports at the head of Lake Su- 
perior. Much time was lost by the fleet 
last week on account of the thick weather 
and the delay made quite a little business 
for the wild carriers in the ore trade. 



The steamer G. J. Grammer, which was 
sunk in a collision with the steamer North- 
ern Queen last month, completed repairs 
at the Cleveland yard and left for Erie, 
where she will take on a cargo of coal. 
The Grammer was out of commission 
nearly four weeks and the repairs will cost 
between $30,000 and $35,000. The steamer 
W. K. Bixby, which was badly damaged 
the same day the Grammer was sunk, was 
floated out of drydock at Ashtabula after 
repairs, having had seventy damaged plates. 
Her repair bill will be $30,000 or $35,000. 
Repairs on the steamer Mataafa, which are 
being made at Toledo, will cost about 
$25,000. The Mataafa was in collision with 
the steamer G. Watson French in Lake 
St. Clair. Another big repair job was the 
steamer Ogdensburg, which stranded at 
North Point near Milwaukee. The strand- 



ALTERATIONS— IN NOVEMBER. 



The first of the two steel package 
freighters for Atlantic Coast trade, which 
are being built by the Toledo Shipbuild- 
ing Company, Toledo, was launched Au- 



gust 22. 



Captain John Mitchell has asked the 
shipbuilders for bids for reconstructing a 
number of steamers of his fleet. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases ! 



One result of the loss of the Titanic — 
we do not mean the inquiry into that loss 
— ^is that there is a general recognition 
that the ships constructed on the same 
principle as the lost steamer are woefully 
defective in the matter of bulkheads, wa- 
tertight compartments and other elements 
of construction designed to preserve the 
buoyancy of the vessel in case of collision 
and render her as "unsinkable" as the 
most up-to-date constructive devices can 
make her. 

The White Star Company, even before 
the inquiry, recognized this fact, it is 
said, and immediately after the collision 
decided to alter the interior construction 
of the Olympic, the Titanic's sister ship, 
so as to greatly increase the element of 
safety in case of similar mishap. New 
steamers on the stocks at the time of the 
loss of the Titanic were also altered in 
their designs. Double skins, higher bulk- 
heads and more of them are to be in- 
stalled. 

The Olympic goes to the shipyard for 
alterations in November, and will be made 
as safe in this respect as is possible. It 
is recognized by her owners that she is 
not safe now in her present condition. 

But she has, nevertheless, been run- 
ning and carrying thousands of passengers 
ever since the Titanic catastrophe, and 
she will keep on the route until the ship- 
yard is ready to receive her in November. 

It might perhaps be libelous to state that the 
ship is unsafe in her present condition, 
so we will not say so. We will confine 
ourselves to saying that her owners ap- 
pear to think she is, or, to put it another 
way, that she is not as safe as she might 
be, though of course we may be mistaken, 
and the real fact may be that they are 
only sending her to the shipyard to give 
employment to the thousands of workmen 
there, the alterations being estimated at a 
cost of between $5,000,000 and $6,000,000. 

When the Titanic started on her first 
and fatal voyage, she was proclaimed to be 
practically unsinkable, and most of the 
fifteen hundred who went to the bottom 
with her were seemingly of that belief 
almost up to the time she took the final 
plunge. 

Since then the Olympic has been on the 
route and in all probability will remain on 
it until November in her present state. 
Should she in the interim encounter any 
mishap by collision, the tragedy of the 
Titanic might be repeated. It is not prob- 
able that she will, however, and the travel- 
ing public can afford to take a chance, 
anyhow. Besides, the fall passenger sea- 
son is now about opening, and accommo- 
dations of any sort and all sorts will be 
in demand. — New York Call. 



NOTICE TO SEAMEN. 



IMPORTANT. 



It is announced from Copenhagen that 
the bill which was introduced into the 
Danish Parliament on January 20 for the 
grant of a 99 years' concession to a Danish 
syndicate for improving the harbor of St. 
Thomas, West Indies, has, subject to mod- 
ifications, been passed and received the 
royal assent. As a result of the adoption 
of the new law the syndicate has founded 
at Copenhagen a Danish joint stock com- 
l)any for raising the $5,000,000 ca])itai 
necessary. 



Any seaman who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above sta- 
ted reasons, or because of rules of the so- 
called "Welfare Plan," by any agent or 
representative of the Lake Carriers' Asso- 
ciation or any of its allied concerns, in- 
cluding the masters and officers of the 
ships. Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 
V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

Joseph Orlick, last heard of on steamer 
Santa Marie, in 1908, is inquired for by 
Carl Stocket, 71 Main street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Ed Jordan, No. 10415, L. S. U., is inquired 
for by his sister, Mrs. Raynor, 319 Caroline 
Street South, Hamilton. Any one knowing 
his whereabouts please notify the above ad- 
dress. 



LAKE DISTRICT, I. S. U. of A. 

HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

570 West Lake Street, Chicago, III. 
BRANCHES AND AGENCIES. 

BUFFALO, N. T .55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, O. 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, 21 High Street 

Telephone 552. 

TOLEDO, OHIO 54 Main Street 

Telephone Bell East 756. 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone. New, Broad 385. 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y.. 70 Isabella Street 

CONNBAUT, 992 . Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

BRIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 
HEADQUARTERS. 
71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Telephone Seneca 48. 

BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 445 LaSaile Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1814 Fourth Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 

HEADQUARTERS. 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 2295. 
BRANCHES. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 314 N. Clark Street 

ASHTABULA, 74 Bridge Street 

TOLEDO, 54 Main Street 

DETROIT, MICH 7 East Woodbridge Street 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 

MARINE HOSPITALS. 

CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH.. CLEVELAND, O. 

RELIEF STATIONS. 

Ashland, Wis. Ogdensburg, N. Y. 

Ashtabula Harbor, O. Oswego, N. Y. 

Buffalo, N. Y. Port Huron, Mich. 

Duluth, Minn. Manitowoc, Wis. 

Bscanaba, Mich. Marquette, Mich. 

Grand Haven, Mich. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Green Bay, Mich. Saginaw, Mich. 

Hourrhton, Mich. Sandusky, O. 

T udington, Mich. Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 

Manistee, Mich. Sheboygan, Wis. 

Erie, Pa. Superior, Wis. 

Menominee, Mich. Toledo, O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



THE BANSHEE. 
(Continued from Page 2.) 



and there : and the whole ended with a post- 
script, reading: 

"P. S. — I suppose I may as well tell you, 
though I have half a mind not to spoil this let- 
ter with bad news. Poor Tray was run oyer 
and killed yesterday morning by a passing 
bus. I almost think the poor thing committed 
suicide. He was moping all the time after 
you left us and would hardly eat anything. He 
would not even bark at people like he used to. 
.\unt Mary had him buried down somewhere 
by the river." 

Bill looked at the top of tlic letter. It 
\va.s dated April the 30th. Then he looked 
at the dog lying ended up at Dan'.s feet and 
watching them both from beneath his shaggy, 
l)lack brows. Despite the heat a slight shiver 
ran up along Rill's .spine. It was on Sunday 
afternoon, April the 29th. that Tray number 
two had sought them out on the Esplanade 
in Calcutta. Allowing for the difference in 
longitude between London and Calcutta it 
must have been about the same hour when 
the original Tray had been run over and 
killed in London ! 

Bill could tell by the perturbed look on 
Dan's face that he, too, had noted the weird 
coincidence. Like himself Dan had studied 
a little navigation, expecting on his return 
home to pass the Board of Trade's examina- 
tion for second mate. Hence the problem of 
longitude involved in the strange affair pre- 
sented no difificulty to either of them. 

"What d'you make of it?" asked Bill, 
pointing first to the postscript, and then to 
the recumbent dog. 

Dan tossed his head backward as if shak- 
ing off an oppressive thought. 

"It looks kind of uncanny," he said, "but 
I suppose it just 'appened that way. Queer 
things like that do 'appen sometimes — eh. 
Tray?" 

Tray jumped up, wagging his tail vigorous- 
ly, and rubbing his nose with one of his paws, 
saying as plainly as dog could say it, "Sure." 
"Let's go on board," said Dan after a 
while ; to which proposition Tray assented 
with a joyous bark. 

This wqs on a Saturday. On the Wednes- 
day following the Hamadryad cast oflf her 
moorings and proceeded down the Hooghly 
on her way to London. Down the Bay of 
Bengal and across the Indian Ocean she 
bucked the Southwest Monsoons. Oflf the 
Cape of Good Hope she ran into a Table 
Mountain buster that nearly dismasted her. 
.\ River Plate pampero, on a rampage far 
from its native lair, took a severe fall out 
of her in the South Atlantic. Up through 
the Southeast Trades, the Doldroms, and the 
Northeast Trades, she sped on her home- 
ward course "with her flying kites abroad." 
But nothing really worth recording occurred 
until she had reached the latitude of the 
Azores and, approximately, longitude 37° or 
38° West. 

It was on a Sunday night. A roaring 
westerly gale was lashing the sea into long, 
heaving, white-capped combers that lapped 
the Hamadryad's lean run, and overflowed 
her curvilinear waist in torrents every time 
she slid over their crests. The black, riven 
scud scurrying across the face of the full 
moon foretold even more surely than the fall- 
ing mercury in the big swinging barometer 
down in the cabin that more wind was due 
before morning. 

Captain Skinner of the Hamadryad was a 
driver. He knew his ship; and fifty years of 



toe to toe battling with the elements had 
taught him just how far it was safe to brave 
them. For hours he drove the old girl 
through the seething seas under to'gallant 
sails when many another skipper would have 
had her snugged down to lower topsails. 
It's the only way to get your money's worth 
out of a breeze. "Make your run while the 
wind blows" is the nautical equivalent of 
"Make hay while the sun shines." 

But even the stoutest of ships must yield 
when Ne])tune, Boreas & Co. jnit the screws 
on. A little after four bells in the first watch 
all hands were called to shorten sail. The 
three to'gallant sails, the mizzen upper top- 
sail, the crossjack, and the mainsail, were 
clewed up and furled. The flying jib was 
hauled down, and the bonnet taken off the 
jib. 

"That'll be about enough for awhile, Mr. 
Graham," the skipper told the mate after the 
latter had reported to him that she still 
logged thirteen knots. "Just ease off a foot 
or so on the fore an' main topsail halyards, 
so's to take some o' the strain ofif the 
leeches." 

And thus stripped of her upper kites the 
Hamadryad wallowed along, up wave and 
down billow, when the starboard watch went 
below at twelve o'clock. The only dry place 
around the decks was a small spot on the 
Iccside of the forecastle head, where the look- 
out man was tramping back and forth laying 
plans for having a good time on the old 
" 'Ighway." The watch on deck was huddled 
in the galley, some dozing, some smoking, 
and some listening to a yarn which "Pegleg" 
Clancy was spinning. 

About three o'clock the gale seemed to 
have reached its maximum velocity. The 
spars and tophamper cracked in a snapping, 
jerky fashion that grated on the nerves. Her 
timbers groaned like lost souls of Titans. 
Above it all the roar of the wind and the 
waves rose in a thunderous chorus of blus- 
tering exultation at their power over the 
puny works of man. 

"They'll be takin' in more sail whin the 
watch below comes on deck," predicted 
Clancy, peering up to windward through the 
darkness. 

Just then they were startled by hearing 
Tray howling forward like mad. It was the 
first time they had ever heard him howl ; and 
the distressful wail, coupled with the shriek- 
ing of the gale, was too much even for the 
case-hardened nerves of seasoned sailormen. 

"Go an' chase him away, Dick," said 
Clancy to the ordinary seaman. 

Dick went out on deck, and anon they 
heard him hooting at the dog. But his ef- 
forts were in vain, for Tray kept on howling 
as though his heart were breaking. Like a 
dirge to the dead the piercing, mournful cry 
rang out upon the tempest, imtil the little 
gang in the galley shuddered from an un- 
named fright. 

Clancy piously crossed himself. 

"The saints defind us," he said in an awe- 
struck voice. "It remoinds me av the banshee 
that was wailin' under widow Harrigan's win- 
dow the noight the poor sowl died. 'Twas 
on the Earl av Roscommon's estate whin Oi 
was a boy. Father Dorsey had just given 
her absolution, an' — " 

Here Clancy was interrupted by a terrific 
report, as if a 12-inch gun had been fired 
ju.st above their heads. I'^rightened they 
rushed out on deck and looked aloft. The 



LABOR'S ECONOMIC PLATrORM. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted into 
law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of United States Gov- 
ernment Postal Savings Banks. 

INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
or AMERICA. 

(Continued from Page 5.) 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 91 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 1408% Western Ave.. P. O. Box 
875 

PORTLAND. Ore.. 101 N. Front St. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal.. 123 Fifth St.. P. O. Box 674. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 51 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE. Wash.. 209-210 Powell Building. P. O 
Box U35. 
SAN PEDRO. Cal.. P. O. Box 64. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

ASTORIA. Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

Branches: 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

LA CONNER, Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABP:rDEEN. Wash., p. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGETOWN, Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER, Ore. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 

KETCHIKAN. 
LORING, Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBURG. Alaska. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO. CaL, 93 Steuart St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE. Wash., 84 Seneea St., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be procured by seamen at 
any of the above-mentioned places; 
also at the headquarters of the 

PEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASU 

29 ERSKINE STREET. SYDNEY, N. 8. W. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



main upper topsail had been blown out of 
the boltropes. 

"Lower away on that fore topsail hal- 
yard," roared the mate. "Take a turn with 
the spilling buntlines first. Call the watch." 

Tray was still howling as mournfully as 
ever, but in the excitement of the moment 
not much attention was accorded him. Be- 
sides, no one had time to chase after the 
poor brute and try to stop his eerie crying. 

Presently the watch below came on deck. 
Tlie topsail yard was now down on the 
lifts, and the braces and downhauls hauled 
taut. 

"Put a reef in that sail," the mate shouted 
after them as all hands scrambled aloft and 
each watch laid out on its respective yard- 
arm. 

Bill and Dan were the first aloft on their 
side. Dan straddled the yard outside of the 
lift and took hold of the reef earing. Bill 
was next to him. Together they pulled up 
llic leech and rove off the reef earing. Bill 
getting the dog's-ear into shape and grab- 
bing hold of the nearest reef-point. While 
they were waiting for the man at the weather 
reef earing to sing out, "Haul out to lee- 
ward," Dan leaned over to Bill and shouted 
in his ear : 

"I wish that dam'd dog would stop yowlin' ; 
it makes me nervous list'nin' to 'im. I 'ad 
a bad dream last watch. I dreamt — " 

"Look out !" shouted Bill, letting go of 
the reef-point and running his arm through 
tile nearest becket. The ship from some 
cause or other was broaching to. Before the 
man at the wheel could get her off the wind 
again, the lee spilling buntline snapped from 
the strain. The sail bellied out with a boom- 
ing jerk that all but pulled the jackstay out 
from the yard. 

Bill heard a muffled shriek. Instinctively 
he turned his head to the right, and his blood 
nearly froze in his veins as he saw Dan topple 
over backward and fall headlong into the 
hissing waters below. 

"Man overboard !" he roared with all the 
strength of his lungs. "Man overboard!" 
was echoed from mouth to mouth as they slid 
down the rigging and backstays to the deck. 

But, alas ! no boat could have lived in that 
sea, even had it been possible to bring the 
ship to the wind without the danger of hav- 
ing her founder. She was racing along at 
the rate of twelve or thirteen knots an hour ; 
and before they could take in enough sails 
to make it .safe to heave her to, she would 
be miles and miles from the spot where Dan 
fell overboard. With heavy hearts they real- 
ized that the poor fellow was beyond all 
human aid. 

"Where's Tray?" .someone asked. And 
then it occurred to them that the dog's howl- 
ing had suddenly ceased when the cry of 
"Man overboard" had been raised. As if 
inspired by one thought all hands set to 
searching for Tray, whistling and calling on 
him by name. For over an hour they kept 
up the quest, but all in vain. Poor Tray was 
gone along with his master ; probably washed 
overboard by the sea that struck the ship 
abreast of the fore rigging when she 
broached to. ( )nly Clancy thought otlicrwise. 

" 'Twas a banshee, sure," he said, crossing 
himself again. "May the saints prcsarve us 
an' bring us safe into port again." 

Silently they laid aloft once more and fin- 
i.shed reefing the fore topsail. With the ad- 
vent of daylight the wind moderated. By 
noon they had a new main upper topsail bent 



and set. When night again set in the Ham- 
adryad was scudding along with the main 
to'gallant sail on her. 

As the days went by, and the voyage drew 
nearer and nearer to an end, the shock from 
Dan's tragic death gradually wore off. Such 
happenings are among the contingencies of 
life afloat which the seaman must ever be 
ready to face. Also, life before the mast — 
and abaft the mast, too — has a callousing 
effect on the mind which make death and its 
ordinary associations seem more or less mat- 
ter-of-fact. "Hawserlaid" Bill, having been 
Dan's particular chum, was, perhaps, the only 
one on the ship who experienced any great 
grief over the untimely taking off of his ship- 
mate. 

Three weeks to a day from the time that 
Dan was drowned the Hamadryad tied up 
in the East India dock in London. At six 
o'clock on the same evening "Hawserlaid" 
Bill was walking up Charles street. Stepney, 
looking for Roland's Court. In his hand he 
carried a parcel containing the silk petticoats, 
scarfs and baby's rattle which Dan and him- 
self had bought in Calcutta. 

By and by he turned into Roland's Court 
and stopped before No. 6, a little three-room 
cottage looking much the same as scores of 
others surrounding it. On the door knob 
hung a piece of black crape ! 

Was it possible. Bill asked himself, won- 
deringly, that they had already had news of 
Dan's death ! 

With some hesitation he knocked on the 
door. A tall, angular, elderly woman, 
dressed in funereal black, came out and 
peered inquiringly at him through a pair of 
steel-rimmed spectacles. 

"Are you Mrs. Roberts, ma'm ?" asked Bill, 
politely dofifing his cap. 

"Yes, sir," she answered. 

"Is Mrs. Collins in?" he continued. "I'm 
a friend of Dan Collins." 

For a moment she seemed to falter. Then, 
in a low, tremulous voice, she said : 

"Mrs. Collins is dead, sir." 

"Dead !" repeated Bill, aghast. Good 
Heavens ! What strange chain of misfortunes 
was this? Mechanically, and hardly know- 
ing what he was saying, he asked : 

"When an' how did she die?" 

"She died in childbirth, along with 'er 
baby, just three weeks ago to-day, sir." 

Three weeks ago to-day! A cold sweat 
broke out on Bill's forehead. Was there 
such a thing as, as, as — but, pshaw! it 
couldn't be. And yet! Almost fearfully 
he asked : 

"Don't think me too pryin', ma'm ; but, but, 
but would you kindly tell me what time o' 
day it was when Mrs. Collins died?" 

"She died shortly after break o' day, sir — 
about half past six I should say." 

The shock dazed him at first. Then, as 
his brain cleared, he muttered, "Half past six ; 
half past six !" 

With a rush his memory went back to 
that fateful morning at sea. Again he heard 
ringing in his ears the shriek of Dan as the 
topsail knocked him off the yard. Rapidly 
he made a mental calculation. It was four 
o'clock in the morning, in longitude 27° and 
some odd minutes West — two hours and a 
half difference in time between there and 
London. Yes, there was no doubt of it ; Dan 
and his wife had died at the same instant ! 
And there was Tray! 

Merciful God! what was it? what could 
it be? he asked himself, bewildered, as he 



mopped the beads of cold sweat from his 
brow. A shudder ran through his frame, 
and he felt himself growing dizzy. 

Mrs. Roberts watched him with a mingled 
expression of curiosity and apprehension. 

"Won't you come in an' 'ave a cup of tea, 
sir?" she said. ."I was just goin' to 'ave 
some myself when you came." 

"Yes, thank you, ma'm," replied Bill, 
faintly. He felt the need of a stimulant to 
brace him for the ordeal of tcHng her the 
sad tidings which he was bringing. 

El Tuerto. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



cost being $2., SO each. The fines were paid 
and a transcript of the cases demanded. 
The Steel Trust is evidently determined to 
continue its policy of using its tremendous 
power to thwart the effort of its employes 
to organize. The American Federation of 
Labor purposes, however, to continue its 
effort, and no matter what obstacles are 
encountered it is purposed to organize these 
men so that they may have a part in de- 
termining wages and conditions under 
which they are employed. There is no pro- 
tection to-day for the men employed in the 
vast steel plants of the country, and aside 
from these works being charnel houses, 
long hours and low wages are the rule. 



Prisoners Badly Treated. 
Declaring the House of Correction to be 
a penal institution exclusively, and not a 
corrective one, as is generally supposed, 
the board of police magistrates of Balti- 
more, Md., has voiced a scathing criticism 
of the institution in the report it has made 
to the Governor of the State. The board 
declares that it has had its eyes opened, 
and while it believed that the men sent to 
the House of Correction were put to work 
on the farm, or on outside labor, it has 
found that the men are cooped up in con- 
tractors' shops and never allowed outside, 
and if they do not perform their allotted 
task, which is found in many instances to 
be rather severe, they are lashed as punish- 
ment. The board states that it appears 
that one of the chief ends of the institu- 
tion was to make a favorite showing in 
financial matters, and that the interest of 
the contractors who conduct the shirt and 
mat factories in the institution, and of the 
Stale, came before the interests of the pris- 
oners. This fact was made clear by the 
superintendent, who complained that the 
magistrates were sending men to the insti- 
tution for too short periods for them to be 
of any use to the contractors, or to the 
State, stating that the magistrates should 
not send men for thirty or sixty days, be- 
cause unless they came for at least three 
months, they would be of no use to the 
contractors. The magistrates further state 
tlial the institution is in a general unsani- 
tary condition. .As stated, prisoners are 
I)unishcd for slow work, the magistrates 
claiming this system has possibilities of 
great injustice. The Governor of the State 
is much exercised over this report, and 
measures are to be taken to inaugurate a 
thorough investigation. 



'Ilic pincap])le i>ack of Hawaii this sea- 
son is estimated at 1,000,000 ca.ses of 24 
tins each, wliile the output of "pinectar" 
is 100,000 gallons. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




SEATTLE, WASH. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



Residence Phone Ind. Green 185 



School Phone Ind. A 4484 



Oscar S. Straus, former Secre- 
tary of Commerce and Labor in the 
Cabinet of Roosevelt, was unani- 
mously acclaimed the Progressive 
nominee for Governor of New York. 
Designs are being made by the 
United States Bureau of Engraving 
and Printing for a dozen new stamps 
that are to be used in the parcel 
post service. These stamps will 
range in denomination from 1 cent 
to $1. 

The Denver Grand Jury returned 
indictments against more than 100 
persons and three corporations. City 
oflicials are charged with failing to 
enforce laws governing red-light dis- 
trict. Various offenses are alleged 
in other indictments. 

Plans for Chicago's proposed sub- 
way system are completed. The 
plans provide for four main lines 
traversing the city. The estimate 
for construction is placed at $96,- 
2.S7,000, and the equipment at $34,- 
884,000. The system would have a 
capacity of 187,000 seats per hour. 

Negotiations are pending in New 
York for the acquisition of the As- 
sociated Oil Company by the Union 
Oil Company of California. The 
.\ssociated is owned by the Southern 
Pacific. The Union has authorized 
capital of $.iO,000,000 and promises 
to be formidable competitor of the 
Standard. 

.^cting Attorney-General Harr in- 
structed the United States Attorney 
at Seattle to agree to a reversal by 
the Circuit Court of Appeals of 
former Judge Hanford's decision, 
canceling the citizenship of Leonard 
Olsson, a Socialist, which resulted 
in impeachment proceedings against 
Ilanford. 

The United States Navy is to have 
for its exclusive use a vast oil field 
in California, from which it will ob- 
tain fuel for its oil-burning fighting 
ships. President Taft has with- 
drawn 37,000 acres of oil lands in 
the Elk Hills, California, for the 
exclusive purpose of serving as a 
reserve source of supply of fuel oil 
for the Navy. 

More than 420,000 old soldiers are 
entitled to an increase in their pen- 
sions, under the Sherwood law, it 
was announced at the Pension 
Bureau. These veterans will receive 
an average of $260 per year under 
the increases provided in the new 
law. To date 450,000 claims have 
been filed under the new law, 40,000 
lieing received in one day. Not all 
of these will be allowed. 

The Federal Government will col- 
lect duty over prfttest for the time 
l)eing on all importations of ship- 
building materials and equipment 
placed on the free list at the last 
session of Congress. This course 
will be followed until the Treasury 
Department has decided the scope of 
free entry under the new law. Un- 
til it is decided whether food for 
ships and other articles are free the 
duties will be deposited. 

The foreign commerce of the Uni- 
ted States touched a new high 
record during August. 'August com- 
pleted an eight-months' period dur- 
ing which America's business with 
other nations increased $130,000,000 
on the import side and $150,000,000 
on the export side over any other 
year in the country's history. For 
tlie eight months tlie export busi- 
ness of the United States was $1,- 
417,000,000 and the import business 
$1,188,000,000. 



MARSHALL'S 
Navigation School 



Day and Night 
REASONABLE TERMS 
204 Grand Trunk Pacific Dock 



SEATTLE 



The Northwest 
Navigation School 

Srhool closed for six months 

Will reopen November 1, 1912 

Applicants prepared for Master's, 

Mate's and Pilot's License of all 

grades. Ocean, coast and inland 

waters. Terms reasonable. 

CAPT. E. SNELLENBERG, 
Graduate New York Nautical Col- 
lege; licensed master of ocean steam 
and sail vessels (unlimited); pilot of 
various inland waters; adjuster of 
compasses, 322 Globe Bldg., First 
Ave. and Madison St., Seattle, Wash. 



Seattle Navigation School 




THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 
UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



Headquarters For 

Union Made Clothing 

FURNISHINGS, HATS AND SHOES 

At 

WESTERMAN & SCHERMER 

220 and 222 First Avenue, South 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



Open the entire year, 
and In touch with 
latest requirements. 
Candidates thoroughly 
prepared for License 
of any grade; Master, 
Mate or PMIot; Ocean, 
Coast or Inland, 



By CAPT. W. J. SMITH, 
Nautical Expert, 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical College, 
Licensed Master of Ocean steam and 
sail vessels (unlimited), and Master 
and Pilot for Inland waters. Author of 
"Self-Instructor In Navigation," Author 
of "Practical Compass Adjustment." 
Compass Adjuster. 

507 MARITIME BUILDING 
911 Western Ave., SEATTLE, Wash. 

Phones: 
School, Main 3300. Res. Queen Anne 664 



SMOKE 

The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union -made cigars. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

532 Second Street - - Eureka, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY <£. YOUNG 
Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparllla and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers In Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St. 

Seattle, Wash. 



Herman Schulze 

- CIGAR MANUFACTURER - 
Cigars at Wholesale and Retail 

439 SECOND STREET 

Corner F EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only 



Vernon W. Buck Arthur C. McLane 

Carl G. Benson 

BUCK, BENSON & McLANE, 

Lawyers and Proctors In Admiralty 

Free .^dvice to Seamen. 

1265 Empire Building, 

Seattle, Wash. 

Vi tala og skrifva de nordiska spraag. 



Bonney-Watson Co. 

UNDERTAKERS 
3rd and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 
Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or 
telegraph promptly attended to 
Phone, Main 13 
Independent: Elliott 254 



ALASKA HOTEL 

Corner Western and Seneca 

The newest 25-cent house in town. 

New building, new furniture. 

Special attention to mariners. 

FREE BATHS 

Special Weekly Rates 

PETERDESMORE^ropr^^ 

Seattle, WaMh., Letter LUt. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce, letters addressed in care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to call 
or have their mall forwarded during that 
period, they should notify the Agent to 
hold mall until arrival. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squlre-Latlmer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates 

Front Street, between C and D 

EUREKA, CAL. 



For 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 

or 

A SQUARE MEAL 

Try 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



Alonzo, I. 
Anderson, P. T. 
Anderson, HJalmar 
Anderson, Fred 
Andersen, A. 
Anderson, Carl 

Anton 
Bachman, P. W. 
Bendixon, Nick 
Berentsen, Alfred 
Blommendal, J. 
Borgen, H. O. 
Boyd, John 
Bell, Richard 
Bedat, L. 
Cashel, A. 
Carlson, Martin 
Certy, Carl 
Christensen, Roy 
Christensen, H. 
Cotton, John 
Dahl, John 
Davidson, Jakob 
Dennett, John 
Dylevik, Einar 
iJenny, J. B. 
Eckhardt, Charley 
Erikson, Axel -732 
Erikson, Edvard 
Evensen, Andrew 
Eriksen, E. 
Edwards, John 
Edson, Frank 
Erickson, J. R. 
Foss. Louis 
Frost, H. 
Froderberg, R. 
Fichter, A. 
Gibbons, J. 
Ginis, G. 
Gouda, C. 
Giinderson, Olaf 
Gcstgivar. Aug. 
Ciahn, John 
Gr.'tnberg, Fred 
(ReR. Letter) 
Grunwald, A. 
Grant, Dave 



Hall, G. A. 
Holmberg, O. 
Hagberg, Gustaf 
Heynes, H. 
Hansen, Axel M. 
Hollins, Frank 
Iversen, Arthur 
Ivessen, I. 
Jacobson, Knut 
Johnson, Andrew 
Johanson, Einar 
Johnstone, Dick 
Johnsen, Oscar 
Jensen, L. 
Jorgenson, Oluf 
Johansen, Aug. W. 
Johansen, N. G. 
Jonsen, P. 
Johanson, O. K. 
Karlson, Jacob 
Kaas, Otto 
Kastelton. Frank 
King, Frank 
Kasgersen, Christ 
Kneblikoff, I. 
Kylander, H. 
Larson, E. G. 
Lewis, Geo. H. 
Lorin, A. L. 
Lafmore, P. de 
Lungquist, John 
Larsen, S. -1081 
Lee, C. A. 
Maniers, C. 
Magnusen, Lars 
Matson. Mike 
McM.anigal, T. E. 
Meisiand, Hans 
Mikael, J. 
Moller, J. B. 
Muir, James 
Miller, Louis 
Marx, Thorvald 
Maitak, M. 
McKittrick, J. 
McC-iUkh, W. 
Nilson, A. G. 
Nilson, Alfins 



Nilson. P. L. 
Norrell, Oscar 
Nilsen, K. M. 
Naro, H. 
Nelson, Adolf 
Nilson, Frank 
Nordenburg, Johan 
Oehmichen, Fred 
Olsen, M. A. 
Olsen, Nick 
Olsson, Ernst 
Oemlchen, Fred 
Olsen, Claus 
Osterberg, John 
Olsen, Edvin 
Olmholt, D. T. 
Pasquin, A. 
Petterson, A. -1223 
Petterson, Hans 
Person, John 
Pederson, John 
Petterson, Richard 
Perdjuhn, W. 
Pedersen, Carl 
Powell, Gus 
Qulgley, R. E. 
Rathke. R. 
Ratclifte, L. 



Race. Martin 
Samuelson, Harold 
Sievers, John 
Suedarich, J. 
Spelman, J. 
Swenson. B. -1932 
Souig, Chas. 
Serwold, M. O. 
Steen, T. C. 
Samsing, Carl 
Steen, Jens — 
Stange, Fritz 
Thune, H. 
Tuck, W. 
Tessner, R. 
Udley. Harold 
Waurich, R. 
Williams, Jack 
Waltemaht, J. 
Weber, Rasmus 
Wimmer, Geo. 
Welfare, J. A. 
ZImmer. W. 

Packages. 
Borjensen, C. A. 
Miller, Louis 
Petersen, Meyer 



Portland, Or., Letter LUt. 



Anderson, Erick 

B. 
Anderson, Guss. 
Anderson, Peder 
Androllo, A. 
Anderson, Otto 
Aga, John 
-^brams, George 
Balda, Alfonso 
Bergstrom, Paul 
Blomgren, M. A. 
Brodig, W. G. 
Blakstad, Charles 
Bryant, Willie 
Britton, Samuel 
Bochmann, F. 
Cooley, Howard 
Corty, C. 
Cordia, Peter 
Colman, E. 
Christensen, Peter 

C. 
Campbell, John A. 
Dennis, Charles 
Dorff, William 
Degroot. George 
Erickson, L. 
Ewanger, Nils 
Eugene, John 
Gwat, A. H. 
Grove, Al 
Gaileberg. Martin 
Glaas, Waldemar 
Glannus, Alex. 
Heinas. Charles 
Hellsten. Gus 
Homq.«. Salers 
HaK^OTsen, William 
Hultman, A. 
Hayden, Tom 
Haawe, Norwald 



Irwin, Robert 
Jaase, Warren 
Johnson, Jack 
Johnson. George 
Johes, Harry 
Johnson. Chris 
Johnsen, Halvor J. 
Johnsen, Ole 
Johnsen, John 
Jensen, Chris 
Johnson, Axel 
Johnson, H. 
Jensen, Robert 
Kaup, L. 
Keaier, James 
Kutsberg, Gustaf 
Larsson, John 
Lundquist, A. 
Liedekrants, Fred 
Larsen. Engvald 
Lane, Charles 
Larsen, Soren 
Lemmel. Chas. 
Lerksher, Heinrich 
Martinsohn, Alec 
McMahon, Jack 
Mathlsen, Harry 
Mattheu, J. 
Macrae, Alexander 
Matson, Ellis F. 
Meyer. Dick 
Morris, Frank 
Moninger, Joseph 
Neuling, Geo. A. 
Normen, John 
Norman. I.,udwlg 
Olsen. Andy 
Olsen, Severin 
Ohlsen, Charles 
Ophelm. Lars 
Orlik, Joseph 



AMERICAN EXCHANGE HOTEL 
Headquarters for Scandinavians 

OLUF KARLSEN, Proprietor 

GOOD BOARD AND LODGING 

By the Day, Week or Month. Meals 25c. 

First Street, t>etween D and E 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Telephone Main 445 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

THE COSMOPOLITAN 

Furnished Rooms. Club Rooms, Bil- 
liard and Pool Tables, Reading Room 
with latest Swedish, Finn and Nor- 
wegian newspapers. 

BARBER SHOP 
125 D. St., Eureka, Cal. 

ED. SWANSON, Prop. 



WS^^>^^S^A«%^^,A^.A^^^k^^^^^^^^^^^^tf^^^^AA^ 



Peterson, Aage 
Pedersen, Rasmus 
Petersen, Peter 
Perouse, Andre 
Peterson, Maruets 
Pearson, Victor 
Rasmussen, Pete 
Rautio, Jacob 
Rennert, Fred H. 
Richter, Hans 
Rose, Luis C. 
Roche, John 
Sanders, Chaa. 
Samuelson, Victor 
Scott, James 
Schmidt. Frits 
Smith. Ernest 
Schulze, Max 



Sjoholm, Waldemar 
Stephen, M. 
Swensson, John B. 
Spinessen, Kurwald 
Sundberg, Karl 
Tamford, A. 
Thomson, T. 
Turner, A. 
Turner, F. 
Uadren, G. F. 
Wall, A. 
Weber, J. 
Wenner, Edward 
Wold. Statlus 
Wickstrom, Gustav 
Young. Herbert 
Zornbauer, Carl 
Zunk. Bruno. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

The Danish Consulate, 815 Mills 
Bldg., San Francisco, Cal., seeks in- 
formation concerning a Danish sailor, 
Mr. Paul Christian Hansen, called 
Poul Hansen, born in Copenhagen, 
Denmark, January 28, 1870. His 
mother in Copenhagen has not heard 
from him since February, 1902, when 
he sent a letter from San Francisco 
to her. 

Carl Herman Wesstrom, alias John 
Smith, aged 64, a native of Gothland, 
Sweden, last heard from at San 
Francisco, is inquired for by F. G. 
Klintberg, Point Reyes Life Saving 
Station, Cal. 

William Fayette White, whose 
mother died recently, is inquired for 
by his brother. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please address S. A. 
White, 106 W. Salem .'\ve., Roanoke, 
Va. 

When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



ABERpEEN, WASH. 
HUOTARI &i CO. 

Gents' Furnishings, Boots and Shoes 

Groceries and Notions 
We sell everything, and sell at right 
prices. Union-made Goods Specialty 

You Know the Place 
320 S. F. St., near Sailors' Union Hall 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service 

Phone 691 Stand: 

At Sailors' Union Office 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



ROYAL CIGAR STORE 

Headquarters for Union-made Cigars 

and Tobacco. Red Seal Cigar a 

Specialty. The Place to get 

your Sea Stock. 

Agency for Gloss Union Steam 

Laundry. OLE LUND, Prop. 

S. E. Cor. of Herron and F Sts., 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 
Abreast of Sailors' Union Hall. 



When In Aberdeen Trade at 
BEE HIVE. 
Very best union made Hickey Shirts, 
Oil Clothing, Eureka Boots, Hats, Shoes, 
Underwear, Beddings, Tobaccos, and no- 
tions for seafaring men. 

JUKKA SAHLSTEIN 

304 South F St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

Near Sailors' Union Hall 

Open Evenings. 



.WORKERS UNION^ 



UNIOr^STAMP 

Factory 



Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 




OLD TOWN, TACOMA, WASH. 

HTT^/iALLEK 

2320 NORTH 30th STREET 

Notice to our Customers: This place will be known as the "Red Front." 
Seamen's Outfitters, Shoes, Rubber Boots, "Sawyer's" Oil Clothing, Flannel Shirts, 

Quilts, Blankets, Etc. 

"Boss of the Road" Overalls, 75c; Hickory Shirts, 50c; Everything Union Made. 

I will give you a square deal as I want your trade. 

Remember the "Red Front," one block north of Union Hall, Old Town. 



THE PIONEER 

Union Made Cigars and Tobacco 

a Specialty 

Wholesale and Retail 

Pool and Billiards 

412 Herron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

G. L. WILLISCRAFT, Prop. 



Headquarters for 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods 

Boots, Shoes, Hats, Etc. 

ALEXANDER'S WHITE HOUSE 

403 East Heron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

next to Burnett's Jewelry Store 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively In Union-Made CIGARS, 
TOBACCO, ETC. Call at his old Red 
Stand on Water Street, Port Townsend. 
Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 
around the corner from the Union OfRce. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In LIVE 
STOCK, FRESH MEATS AND VEG- 
ETABLES. Shipping supplied at 
lowest rates. :: Port Townsend, Wash. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Pres. 

Port Townsend Mercantile Co. 

(Inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED 
311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: 
Bartlett Wharf, Port Townsend, Wash. 



THE RED FRONT 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, ETC. 
Union Label Goods 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer In 

Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits 

315 Water St., next to Commercial Bank 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



PORTLAND, OR. 

WM. JOHNSON 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 

For Quick Service Call East 4441. Resi- 
dence Phone Tabor 3. I give you a Claim 
Check for your baggage at home. Give 
me your work or we both lose money. 

Office: 
41 UNION AVE. - - PORTLAND, ORE. 

P. ROSENSTEIN J. G. WOOD 

Workingmen's Store 

Importers and Dealers in 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY MADE 

CLOTHING 

Gent's Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, Etc. 
23 N. 3d St., nr. Burnside, Portland, Ore. 

Tel. Main 8295 ROSENSTEIN BROS. 

RAYMOND, WASH. 



MATES, AHOY! 

GO TO THE 



Union Cigar Store 

For your CIGARS, TOBACCO 
and SMOKING SUPPLIES, also 
COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 

RAYMOND, - - WASH. 



i^/N^^^^^^^/^WWWVN^VS^V%/\/S/S/W'WV>^Ni'V^H 



Tacoma, Wash., Letter List. 

Anderson, Edward Jansson, John -2203 

-1739 Kesber, Karl 
Anderson, Albert B. Kirwan, Milton L,. 

-1568 Knappe, Adolph 

Anderson, Max Loren, A. L. 

Bausback, Erwin Martin, Louis -1868 

Behrins, Emil Marikwardt, Carl 

Benson, Charles Munster, Fritz 

Bloom, Charles Nielsen, C. V. 

Buckland, Wm. Olsen, Martin 

Carson, James Peterson, F. 

Christensen, Albert Sovig, Martin 

Erikson, John Swanson, Ben 

Fors, Alfred Veckenstedt, W. 
Gronstrom, WilhelmWeerman, Wm. 

Grove, Albert Zornig, Arthur 
Gustafson, Axel 

Eureka, CaL, Letter List. 



Alexander, G. L. 
Anderson, Otto 
Benson, S. 
Carlson, Gust 
Christensen, O. M. 
Frykln, Gust 
Gottberg, Henry 
Grant, John 
Gulliksen, Lars C. 
Hansen, Hans 
Hansen, J. P. 
Hass, H. 
Horlln, Ernest 
Ivars, Cal. 
Jacobsen, Edy 
Johnson, A. 
Johnsen, Arthur 
Johnson, Halvord 
Jensen, Fredrlk 
Lane, Dick 
Larsen, K. L. 
Langevld, Emest 



Lindblom, Ernest 
Menz, Paul 
Menneky, Fred 
Nilson, Andrew G. 
Nilsen, Julius 
Ogren, Harry 
Olsen, C. 
Paludan, Chas. 
Pedersen, Paul 
Pedersen, Martin 
Petterson. Oskar 
Ramsted, A. 
Rawke, Fred O. 
Slnyard, Walter 
Thomas, Joseph W. 
Thompson, Andrew 
Thoresen, Jens 
Wacksmann, Hans 
Wilson, John 
Wallen, L. 
Zebe, Gustav 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Richard Ryan, who left the British 
steamship Candida at San Francisco 
in July last, is inquired for by the 
British Consui-General. 
heard from since, is inquired for by 
the secretary of -the Marine Cooks' 
and Stewards' Association of the Pa- 
cific Coast, 51 Steuart St., San Fran- 
cisco. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Nik Gustof Svanberg Nelson, born 
in Roguna Jamtland, Sweden, 44 
years of age, light brown hair, blue 
eyes, dark beard, last heard of on 
Standard Oil Company's ship Mat- 
toppa, is inquired for by his sister. 
Miss Elise Svanberg, 3953 Twen- 
tieth street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Peter Iversen last heard from at 
the Marine Hospital, San Francisco, 
Cal., is inquired for by his sister, 
Hanna Lind, at Tacoma, Wash. 

William McGrail, of Baltimore, 
Md., who Sailed on the Atlantic and 
Gulf Coasts as cook for a number of 
years, is inquired for by his brother, 
George McGrail, 603 Decatur street. 
New Orleans, La. 

The following men, who made 
the trip on the bark Annie Johnson, 
leaving San Francisco on March 21, 
1910, and were paid off at San 
Francisco on June 1, 1910, are in- 
quired for by the Matson Naviga- 
tion Company, San Francisco: Ed. 
Benson, Norway, 53 years, A. B.; 
Nils Johansson, Sweden, 56 years, 
A. B.; Angelino Probaste, Chile, 30 
years, A. B.; F. Sunence, Norway, 
34 years, second mate; R. Kurella, 
Germany, 45 years, carpenter; Her- 
man Johnson, Sweden, 32 years, A. 
B.; P. Allen, France, 40 years, A. B.; 
W. Ellingsen, Sweden, 21 years, A. 
B.; Axel Henriks, Finland, 27 years, 
A. B. The first three named men 
made the round trip and were paid 
off in San Francisco, and the last 
six were paid off in Honolulu. 

Andrew John Anderson, who left 
Aberdeen, Wash., on lumber barge 
Washtura for San Francisco, is in- 
quired for. Any one knowing his 
present whereabouts please notify 
Mrs. Anna Anderson, Aberdeen, 
Wash. 

Salvage money is due to the follow- 
ing seamen, who were members of the 
crew of the steamer Washtenaw, when 
assistance was rendered to a British 
vessel, Leicester Castle, off the east 
coast of South America, during Octo- 
ber, 1908: A. Nessrig, H. Hansen, C. 
Johansen, R. Lewis, C. Alsager, E. 
Erickson, R. Ross, C. Anderson, S. 
Anderson, W. H. Crane, S. Johnson 
and A. Bosbury. Apply to Manager 
Marine Department, Union Oil Co., 
San Francisco. 

Will any of the crew of the John 
Palmer on the voyage from Aus- 
tralia to San Francisco or Pacific 
Coast port last year please call on 
or communicate with F. R. Wall, 
324 Merchants' Exchange, S^n Fran- 
cisco, telephone Kearny 394? 



The Bureau of Navigation re- 
ports that 161 sailing, steam, and 
unrigged vessels of 21,139 gross tons 
were built in the United States and 
officially numbered during the monlh 
of August, 1912. 

The North German Lloyd steam- 
ship Sierra Cordaba has been 
launched at Stettin. The vessel is 
the first of a series of four sister 
ships which will leave the stocks 
within the next few months, all 
being destined for the South Ameri- 
can trade. 

The Norwegian iron ship Freia 
sailed from Bridgewater August 20 
for Montevideo, with a cargo of 
1,558,866 feet of spruce lumber. The 
cargo was shipped by Robert Daw- 
son & Sons, and was the largest 
cargo of lumber ever shipped by 
sailing vessel from Bridgewater. 

The Whitehead Torpedo Company 
have bought a large tract of ground 
near Toulon, and it is expected that 
by October works will have been 
completed for the manufacture of 
torpedoes and submarines. In a few 
years' time 3,000 men will probably 
be employed in the new works. 

Messrs. Charles Connell & Com- 
pany, Scotstoun, have launched the 
steel screw steamer Diplomat, of 
about 7,650 tons gross for Messrs. 
T. and J. Harrison, Liverpool. She 
has been built to Lloyd's highest 
class, and triple-expansion engines 
are being supplied by Messrs. Duns- 
muir and Jackson, Govan. 

The contract for the two new fast 
fishery protection boats for the Pa- 
cific Ocean will likely be granted to 
the Dublin Dockyard Company, of 
Dublin. A large number of tenders 
were received from Great Britain 
and Canada. The Canadian tenders, 
however, exceeded the amount pro- 
vided in the appropriation. 

An unsinkable motor lifeboat has 
been built by Messrs. Simpson, 
Strickland & Co., of Dartmouth, to 
the order of the Australian Govern- 
ment. On her trials the boat has 
given eininently satisfactory results, 
and has resisted every effort to sink 
her. She is not only unsinkable, 
but is also self-righting and self- 
emptying. 

Tile monster collier Bridgeport, 
which has just been built for the 
Dominion Coal Company, in Eng- 
land, and was launched last July, is 
one of the 11,000-ton steamers built 
especially for the Sydney-Montreal 
coal trade, and will be the largest 
coal steamer in commission in the 
world. The steamer on her arrival 
will at once go into the coal trade. 

During August 56 ocean steamers 
arrived in the port of Montreal, as 
cnnipared with 73 in May, 54 in 
June and 62 in July. Judging from 
tlie list of ships bound for Mon- 
treal, the number of arrivals during 
September should exceed the total 
for August considerably. The 56 
vessels for August had a total gross 
register tonnage of 393,369 tons. 

The United States collier Neptune 
has been put out of commission at 
Norfolk and it is said she will be 
turned back to her builders. The 
ship had trouble from the start. Her 
engines failed and they were re- 
placed. She had several sea trials, 
but none proved satisfactory. She is 
I)ropcllcd by Westinghouse turbines 
with the Melvillc-McAlpine reducing 
gear. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




San Francisco Letter List. 



The French navy is using a newly 
invented metal for battleship ar- 
mor. 

Russia wants commission appointed 
to settle passport question with Uni- 
ted States. 

The Peruvian Senate has approved 
an internal loan of $50,000,000 for 
the purpose of national defense. 

The British shipping world is pass- 
ing through an era of prosperity 
almost without equal in its history. 
Reports and photographs of Rus- 
sian atrocities in Persia have caused 
a storm of denunciation in Eng- 
land. 

Revolutionary forces along United 
States border are about to join 
Mexican rebellion, according to 
Juarez dispatches. 

The conference of the Interpar- 
liamentary Union, which met recent- 
ly at Geneva. Switzerland, adopted 
a resolution in favor of compulsory 
international arbitration. 

El Tigre, one of the richest mi- 
ning camps in northern Mexico, was 
retaken by federals on September 16, 
after having been in the hands of 
the rebels for two days. 

George Lagagneux, a French avi- 
ator, established a new world's record 
for altitude at Villa Coublay on 
September 17, his machine attaining 
a height of 18,766 feet. 

The village of Ajusco, eighteen 
miles from the Mexican capital, was 
pillaged by Zapatistas on September 
17. Thirty rurales composing the 
garrison were killed or routed. 

Si.xteen persons were killed and 
fifty injured by the derailing on 
September 17 of the express from 
Chester to Liverpool, at Ditton 
Junction, eight miles from Liver- 
pool. 

The United States is about to 
intervene in Santo Domingo. War- 
ships will be dispatched at once to 
the island. A revolution has broken 
out which threatens American and 
other foreign interests. 

That the United States beef trust, 
concerning which so much discussion 
has been on throughout the com- 
monwealth during the past month, 
is about to commence operations in 
.•\ustralia, was stated here recently. 
The federal Attorney-General, Mr. 
Hughes, says that so far as he 
knows the commonwealth has no 
power to grapple effectively with 
such a trust. 

The Frankfort airship docks of the 
Zeppelin Company have just been 
fitted with a complete wireless sta- 
tion. The system is that of Wien, 
with sounding sparks, and a dis- 
tance of about 400 miles is reached 
at present. An alternate current of 
8000 volts proceeds from the trans- 
mitting apparatus. This is by way 
of experiment, and should it prove 
successful, all the Zeppelin airships, 
passenger and military alike, will be 
furnished with wireless of the same 
system. 

Greenland has been crossed for the 
first time from west to east over 
the barren ice by a Swiss expedition 
under Dr. De Quervain, joint di- 
rector of the Swiss Central Meteor- 
ological Institute, who is now at 
Reykjavik, the capital of Iceland. 
Many valuable scientific results are 
said to have been achieved. The 
greatest height of the inland ice 
measured 2500 meters, but they saw 
higher peaks recently and discovered 
mountains on Christian Ninth Land, 
nearer the east coast. 



Letters at the San Francisco Sailors, 
Union Offlce are advertised tor three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post OfBce at the expiration of tour 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mall is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify 
P. Scharrenberg, Headquarters Sailors' 
Union, San Francisco, to forward same 
to the port of their destination. 



Abel, P. 
Addlcks, H. 
Aga, J. 

Albrechtsen, A. 
Alf 

Alkinson, S. 
Allen, J. M. 
Alterleabing, Dick 
Ander, G. 
Anderman, E. 
Andersen, C. L. 
Andersen, E. 
Andersen, John H. 
Andersen, N. -1549 
Andersen. -1812 
Andersen, S. P. 
Anderson -1772 
Anderson, A. 
Anderson, A. P. 
Anderson. Eric Axel 
Baardsen, G. 
Baardsen. H. 
Baere, H. 
Bakker, H. 
Barton. W. 
Bath, C. 
Bausback, E. 
Beausang, E. 
Beck, B. 
Beckel, B. 
Behr, Henry 
Beirsen, A. 
Bengtson, M. 
Bengtsson, John 
Berg, J. 
Berglund, R. 
Bergman, L. J. 
Bergen. P. 
Bergguist, C. 
Bergsten. R. 
Berlin, W. 
Bernard, S. 
Bemhardsen, C. 
Beugh, L. B. 
Bianca. P. 
Birkelbach. W. 
Bittner. F. 
BJlrk. G. 
BJornstad. M. 
Blachburn, G. 
Black. J. 
Campbell, M. 
Callan, J. 
Caplinger. O. 
Carlsen, C. 
Carlson. Chas. J. 
Carlson, G. 
Carlson, O. S. 
Carlsson, -876 
Carlstrom, A. 
Carlstrom, G. 
Ceelan, J. 
Chaler, B. 
Christensen, A. 
Dahler, H. 
Dahlgren, P. 
Danielsen, S. 
Daragher, J. 
Etarwin, Richard 
Daylor, W. J. 
Deiberger, M. 
Dempsey. H. 
Deising, E. 
Devany, D. 

Easton, R. 
Eckart, G. 
Ecken, M. 
Eckers, R. 
Edgerton, J. 
Ediung, K. 
Edstrom, J. 
Edwards, D. 
Ehlert. A. 
Ek C 

Ek'endahl, W. 
Ellingsen. B. 
Ellassen, E. 
Ellis, J. 
Fabroskl, T. 
Farnan, N. 
Faulkner, J. E. 
Fell, Olaf 
Figved, S. 
Finck, J. 
Fischer, P. 
Fjellman, J. 
Gartman, H. 
Geggns. 
Gillholm, A. 
Gilje, S. 
Gjardahl, S. 
Gjosund, P. 
Glase. G. 
Goodrige, M. 
Gorgensen, A. 
Gower. J. 
Grauers, Gust. 
Gray, A. 

Haak. R. 
Haisather, S. 
Haktln. B. 
Hallenberg, 
Ilalvasen. -1425 
Halvorsen, W. 
Hammastein 
Hannus, A. 
Hannus, M. 
Hansen, Ch. 
Hansen, E. 
Hansen, H. 
Hansen, H. O. 
Hansen, H. P. 
Hansen, -968 
Hansen, J. A. J. 
Hansen. J. 
Hansen, J. M. 
Hansen, J. N. 
Hansen, L. P. 
Hansen, N. 

lUman, T. 
Inberg, J. B. 
Ingvardsen, R. 
Iverdtsen. S. B. 

Jackson, J. 
Jacobsen, F. 
Jacobsen, Ole 
Jacobson, J. 
Janncey. J. 
Janoff, A. 
Janson. Pr. 
Jarst. H. 
Jennings, G. 



Anderson, Friz 
Anderson. M. 
Anderson, Otto 
Anderson, S. 
Anderson, S. M. 
Anderson, S. P. 
Anderson, Tom 
Anderson, AV. 
Andersson, O. 
Andersson, -1738 
AncJrea.ssen, G. 
Andreassen, -1477 
Andreson, H. A. 
Anis, J. 
Antonsen, M. 
Appelguist, Otto 
Arbricks, A. 
Armstrong. T. 
Amecke, -1649 

Bltkshaven, S. 
Block, B. 
Block, W. 
Blomberg, G. 
Blumel. W. 
Borg, A. 
Borgen, K. 
Borgesen, H. 
Bower, W. 
Bowers, G. 
Boy, -1715 
Bradic. J. 
Bradley, A. 
Bragge, H. 
Brums. C. 
Brancr, F. 
Brander, M. J. 
Brander, V. 
Brandt, F. 
Bredenbach, A. 
Bredberg, H. 
Brekke, H. 
Brennar, L. 
BresUn, A. 
Brlgga, J. 
Brogan, P. 
Brubo, H. 
Bryde, Ch. 
Buaas, T. 
Bulb, E. 

Christensen, H. 
Christensen, L. P. 
Christophersen, F. 
Classen, G. 
Clausen, J. 
Cooley. H. 
Connell. H. P. 
Connell, P. 
Conrad, H. 
Cornell, R. 
Corrlgan, P. 
Cranby, J. 

Diller. Edw. 
Dixon, J. 
Dobbs. P. W. 
Dobrlck, J. 
Dockrell, W. 
Donelly, W. 
Douglas, K. H. 
Dracar, E. 
Duis, J. 
Durholt, H. 

Elml, A. 
Egeland, Olaf 
Engelhard, F. 
Engstram, M. R. 
Erdmann, B. J. 
Erlckson, G. 
Eriksen, K. H. 
Ericson, A. 
Erlkson, Emil 
Evanger. N. 
Evans, E. 
Evensen, J. 
Evensen, M. 

Flemens. P. 
Foerg, W. 
Fors, A. 
Fox, R. 
Fredrikstad 
Freman, 
Froise, E. 

Gregory, P. 
Grondahl. -802 
Gronman. H. R. 
Gros, J. 

Groschefskle, F. 
Guddlng, A. 
Gueno, P. 
Gunter, M. 
Gustafson, J. 
Guthre, R. 
Gynter, J. 

Hansen, O. 
Hanson. J. P. 
Hanssen, -1867. 
Harjes. Albert 
Harrhorson, H. 
Hartog, J. 
Hase, J. 
Haseth, K. 
Haugen, L. 
Helen, P. 
Hellsten, H. 
Hennlngsen, C. 
Henricksen, C. 
Henriksen, J. 
Henrikson, H. 
Henze, A. 
Hermansson, -1622 
Hllsen, Ingvald 
House, J. 
Houston, R. 
Hutchison, S. C. 

Iversen, C. 
Iversen, R. 
Irvln, R. 



Jensen, N. 
Jensen, O. 
Jeppson, P. 
Joliannessen, -1549 
Joliannson, G. 
Joliansen, A. H. 
Joliansen, -2026 
Joliansen, -1343 
Johansen, -2094 
Johansen, Hans 
Johansen, H .B. E. 
Johansen, G. W. 
Joliansen, K. 
Johansen, S. A. 
Johanson, -2186 
Kaare, J. 
Kadden, J. 
Kahlberg, W. 
Kallos, J. 
Kane, G. 
Karlsen, L. 
Karlsson, E. 
Karp, F. 
Keiss, L. 
Kelly, Th. 
Kesber, K. 
Kerlsson, E. 
Keskulas, Johan 
Klclman, J. 
Kilpatrick. C. 
Klarsen. A. 
Klel)ingat, F. 
Kleppe, T. 
Kllck, A. 
Klotske, O. 
l>aakso, F. 
Laatz, O. 
Lagerberg, Pete 
Laine. K. 
r.,aizkowki, A. 
Kapinsalo, O. 
Larsen, E. 
Larsen, H. M. 
Larsen, J. 
l.arsen, -1647 
1-arsen, -1677 
Larsen, M. 
Larson, C. H. 
Larson, F. 
Ijarson, G. 
Lathrop, J. 
Laurltson, M. 
Leckschas, H. 
Leina, G. 
Maatson, O. 
Machado, H. 
MacCourt, J. 
Madsen, Ch. 
Maki, I. 
Malnigren, E. 
Markmann, H. 
Markus, M. 
Martin, H. 
Martin, O. 
Martinsen, I. 
Martinsen, R. 
Marthiassen, N. 
Mathisen. O. H. 
Matsinger, W. 
Mattsan, W. 
Mattson, -1471 
McFarland, J. M. 
McGahen, John 
Mclnnis, M . 
McKeowen, Th. 
McMahon, J. T. 
Mcl'herson, R. 
Melder, A. 
Mersman, A. 
Nachtigall, H. 
Nagel, A. 
Nelsen, -733 
Nelson, A. B. 
Nelson, Chas. 
Nelson, E. 
Nelson, M. 
Nelson. W. 
Nelson, -654 
Nichols, F. 
Nickaisen, C. 
Niederacher, L. 
Nielsen -1072 
Nielsen, C. 
Nielsen, E. 
Nielsen, L. M. 
OConnell, H. 
Oelerich. H. 
Ohlsen. -569 
Ohman, P. 
Olsan, W. 
Olsen, A. 
Olsen, E. 
Olsen, -502 
Olsen, -823 
Olsen, J. 
Olsen, M. 
Olsen, Ole A. 



Jensen, -442 
Jensen, -2062 
.Jensen, -2110 
Jensen. -1614 
Jensen, H. 
Jensen, I. M. 
Jensen, J. E. 
.Jensen. M. 
Jensen, M. O. 



Johanson. Th. 
Johansson, -9094 
Johnsen, J. 
Johnsen, P. 
.lohnson, A. 
Johnson, -1300 
Johnson, Alrik 
Johnson, -2231 
Johnson, Geo C. 
Jonsen, -2218 
Jorgensen, A. 
Jorgensen, -1840 
Jorgensen. T. 
Josephsen. W. 
Juval, B. 
Klotzke, O. 
Kluver. G. 
Knoft, L. 
Knudsen, David 
Kohlmenter. 
Koloston, J. 
Konrad, F. 
Koop, F. 
Korlson, M. 
Korsberg. Volmar 
Kramer, F. 
Krile, B. 
Kristiansen, C. 
Kristansen, J. 
Kristiansen, H. 
Kristoffersen, Olaf 
Kromer, F. 
Kuhl, H. 
Kvalvik, Oscar 

Lell, Ch. 
T^epp, A. 
Lerstern, J. O. 
Lind, Cii. 
Linilekrantz, F. 
Lindeman, E. 

O. 
Linrusl, J. 
Lipsek, Th. 
Luckman, E. 
Lude, T. 
I^udlow, J. 
Ludvigsen. -1249 
Lund. -599 
Lunde, Ole 
Ludewig, E. 
Lundgren, R. 
Lundquist, C. 
Lundquist, H. W. 
Mestars, G. 
Meyer, E. 
Meyer, M. 
Michelson, J. 
Mikelsen, -1620 
Mikelson, C. 
Miller, W. 
Milos, P. 
Minter, 
Moberg, K. 
Moen, H. 
Moen, R. 
Molir. E. 
Mohrhoff. J. 
MoUer, A. (Reg. 
Momson, D. 

Lr.) 
Monsen, A. 
Morrison, D. 
Mortensen, R. 
Muller, W. 
Munk, Ch. 
Murphy, J. A. 
Murphy, Michael 

Nielsen, N. P. 
Nielsen, O. 
Nielsen, P. W. C. 
Nielsen, W. A. T. 
Nilsen, A. 
Nilsen, -520 
Nilsen, J. C. 
Nolan, G. S. 
Norberg, J. A. 
Nordstrom, E. W. 
Nordstrom, J. 
Norris, E. 
Norrls, N. 
Nower, G. 
NurgI, Peter 

Olson, B. 
Olson, -562 
Olssen, Harry 
Olsson, J. 
Olsson, O. -910 
Olsson, -1101. 
Olsson -705 
Olsson -1104 
Olsson, G. M. 
Olsson, -1109 
O'Neill. J. 
Opderbeck, — 



Olsen, Oscar Efralm Orsen, A. 



Olsen, P. 
(jlsen. W. 
Packham, T. 
I'aerson, N. 
Pagel. -1216 
Pajoman, -2093 
Palmeiro, A. J. 
Papeijoglon, C. 
Peachman, G. 
Pearson, A. 
I'earson, J. 
I'edersen, G. 
Pedersen, M. 
Pedersen, R. 
Pedersen, -1064 
Pederson, -1392 
Perkins, P. 
Peron, Edmond 
Person, Ch. 
Petersen, C. 
Petersen. Ch. 
Petersen. Chas. 
Petersen, E. 
Petersen, -721 
Petersen, H. 
Petersen, O. 
Quezada, B. 
Qulgley, R. 
Rasmalen, O. 
Rasmussen, -497 
Rasmussen, E. 
Rasmussen, H. 
Rasmussen. J. 
Rasmussen. O. 
Rausche. Emil 
Reiche. F. 
Reinhold. Ernst 
Reinke, P. 



Osterman, O. 

Petersen, P. M. 
Petersen, W. 
Peterson, R. 
Peterson, F. 
Peterson, G. 
Peterson, J. 
Petersen, S. 
Petersson, -1301 
Petterson, A. 
Pettersson, E. 
Pottersson, -1447 
Petrick, T. 
Phillips. Geo. 
Pirolse. E. 
Pi te rick. H. 
Pithsanen, V. 
Pittman, A. 
Pk- tner, A. 
Plas, M. 
Posa, T. 
Povvre, G. 
Puntll -1466 
Purgold, G. 

Quinn, Wm. 

Relnson, E. 
Resvoll, F. P. 
Riegel, W. 
Riley, R. H. 
Rippe, R. 
Rivero, John 
Roche, J. 
Rosbeck, G. 
Rudberg. Chas 
Uiind, H. 



Saastedt, N. 
Sabel, L. 
Sane, Th. 
Sanne, R. 
Sandset, O. 
Sandseter, Pi- 
Santos, J. :■ 
Saul, F. 
Savage, R. 
Schager, E. 
Schalenz, Ch. 
Schei, T. B. 
Schevig, B. 
Schlachter 
Schluter, O. 
Schmidt. H. W. 
Schneider, H. 
SchreJ, G. W. 
Schroder, H. 
S.liultz, F. 
Schulze, M. 
Schutty, J. F. 
Seagnen, J. 
Seehusen. C. 
Sergeys, M. L. 
Servantes, L. 
Sievert, H. 
Simonsen, C. 
Simonsen, S. 

Temke, F. 
Thien, E. 
Thirnj, K. 
Tliomas, H. 
Thomel, E. 
Thonipsen, E. 
Thompson, St. 
Thompson, A. 
Tliompson, C. 
Tliorsell, Ch. 
Thorssell. P. N. 

UdekuU, Ch. 
Valbu, H. 
Valeure, A. 
Valles, A. 
Vattli, J. 
Walter, J. 
Walters. Albert B. 
Walrnan, E. 
Wambark, G. 
Wehre. J. 
Wehrtens, H. 
Weldt, H. P. 
Wells, G, 
West, H. 
Wiberg, J. E. 
Zechel, "W. 
Zornquest, O. 



Singleinan, K. 
Sjobloni, K. 
Sjogren, J. 
Skeilmo. -2G13 
Smith, J. V. 
Sningle, W. 
Sonnenijerg, J. 
Soderlund, A. 
Speller, H. 
Spetteland, B. 
Stein, -2099 
Stenberg, G. 
Stengand, W. 
Stinersen, H. 
Sting. Ch. 
Strahdin, H. 
Stahlljaum, E. 
Stendliahn, F. 
Strand, K. 
Strasdln, H. 
Sundberg, R. 
Sundholm, P. 
Suiidquist, E. 
Svenssen, J. 
Svenston, H. 
Svensen, M. 
Svensson, -1995 
Svensson, -1295 
Syvertsen, H. 

Thorsen, J. 
Tronsen. J. M. 
Thorstensen, C. 
Toegersen, -798 
Toft, H. 
Tollefsen, A. 
'I'ornkvist. M. 
Toivik, O. 
Townsend. U. 
Tuppitz, E. 

Uppit, W. 
Veil, O. 
Venema, H. 
Vllhelmson, S. 

Wickstrom 
Wilen, J. 
Williamson, W. 
Wind, J. 
Winther. Hans 
White, G. 
Wolttr, H. 
Work, J. 
Wullman, P. 

Zimmernum, F. 
Ziiloff, P. 



PACKAGES. 

Apply to Secretary of Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific. 

Apple, A. Jorgensen, Oluv 

Balda, A. Kallberg, C. 

Berlin, W. Marten, H. 

Blirhavn, S. Melder, -2085 

Block, Wm. Mersman. A. 

Burgquist, G. A. Niederacher, Ludur 
Christoftersen, Olof Olsson, Carl 

Evensen, M. Pedersen, J. -1138 

Hall, G. A. Prieberg, P. 

Ilalversen, H. Rasmussen. E. 

Hansen, Hilmer Kii(--sell. W. 



Hansen, Karl 
Hartmere -1245 
Jenkins, Fred 
Jensen, -2110 



Sullivan, John 
Sundhalinn, P. 
'I'horesen, J. 
Tupplts. 



Johansson, C. -9094 Walters, A. 
Johnson, J. N., -2161Waltti. H. 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Andreson, -1283 
Andersen, Andrew 
Andersen, Thomas 
Alexander, A. E. 
Chemiowskey, M. 
Cordia, P. 
Dickenson, Richard 
Forsgren, Karl 
Geiger, Joseph 
Gewold, M. O. 
Hansen, -2179 
Hakonssen, C. 
Holden, Olaf S. 
Hansen, Crist 
Hanssen, H. 
Herman, Axel 
Isaacson, -140 
Iverdtsen, S. B. 
Ingebrethsen, John 

A. 
Johannessen, J. H. 
Jenson, J. P. 
Janes. Harvey 
Johnsen. Karl 
Jensen. George 
Jacobsen, -1486 
Johannson, -2077 
Lindholm, Charles 
Lundmark, Helge 
Larsen, Johan 
Laakso, Frans 
Lindroos, A. W. 
Luhrs. Ludvig 
MacManus, Hugh 
Masuhr, George 
MacPherson. Robert 
Olsson, -966 
Oksanen, Juko 



Olsen, Carl, -545 
Olsson, Fred 
Omlchen, F. 
Pentz, Otto 
Penly, Otto 
Rosenfeld, Paul 
Rasmussen, Pete 
Rasehlun. Franz 
Sundman, Emil 
Schantz, Harry 
Sihluter, Paul 
Sundholm, Frans 
Siren, Frans 
Sinyard, A. 
Sharp, Robert 
Straschn. H. 
Sandy. Oskar 
Strom, -2340 
Strom, C. 
Somberg. John 
Slven. Wiktor 
Swensen, Edelman 
Schneider, H. 
Sandby, James 
Schevig, A. B. 
UUappa, Kasti 
Vejada, -190 
Wahl, John 
Weber, Walter 
Wilson, P. S. 
Wold, Hans 

PACKAGES. 
Hansen, John 
Julius, P. 
Lehtinen. Kaarlo 
Pedersen, Peder 
Pollson, Tom 
Uggla. Fred. 



MARINE COOKS' LETTER LIST 
Seattle, Wash. 



Adams, H. 
Andraca, Alf. 
Baker, J. 
Bailey, Wm. 
Barboner, G. N. 
Barker, A. E. 
Bridges, Noel 
Cahill, John 
Champion, Eric 
Claer, Harry 
De Bruin, Tac 
Earl, A. 

Engstrom, Swan 
Flones, Fortunda 
Gandy, Jaa. 
Gray, R. 
Hardy, Jack 
Howard, Jas. 



Kene&ly, E. 
King, R. O. 
Mills. Geo. 
Meyer. Julius 
Mongan, H. E. 
McMuUen, T. J. 
Nielsen, Peter 8. 
Pestell, Stanley 
Piers, Claude 
Redfern, R. 
RoIIan, M. 
Smlthers, J. 
Smith, Marcus 
Snieder, G. J. 
Stacy, Frank 
Thayer, Chas. 
Third, B. 
TInoco, Joe 



THE HARBOR HOTEL 

Formerly "The Mohawk" 

132 EAST STREET 

Opposite Ferry 

STEAM HEAT, HOT AND COLD 

WATER IN EVERY ROOM 



Elevator Service Free Baths 

and a Large Reading Room 

Rates: 

$2.00 PER WEEK AND UP 

50c PER DAY AND UP 

T. L. SELCHAU P. N. NANSBa^ 

Proprietors 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY -AT- LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 
a Specialty 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 

(THE GERMAN BANK) 

Savings Incorporated 1868 Commercial 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

(Member of the Associated Savings 
Banks of San Francisco.) 

The following Branches for Receipt 
and Payment of Deposits only: 

MISSION BRANCH, 2572 Mission St., 
between 21st and 22nd. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, 601 
Clement St., corner 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, 1456 
Haight St., near Masonic Ave. 

June 29th, 1912: 

Assets $51,140,101.75 

Capital actually paid up In 

Cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent 

Funds 1,656,403.80 

Employees' Pension Fund 140,109.60 

Number of Depositors 56,609 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock A. M. to 3 
o'clock P. M., except Saturdays to 12 
o'clock M. and Saturday evenings from 
6:30 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. M., 
for receipt of deposits only. 



DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
$2 to $2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bells and Hot and Cold Water in 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager. 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front St. and Broadvifay, op- 
posite Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier 

400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c 
per night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 
month. Baths, Reading Room. Office 
open all night. Best place near 
waterfront. Investigate. 



UNITED STATES WATCH CLUB 

FINE WATCH REPAIRING 



E. F. COLLINS, Manager 
10 EAST STREET 



S. W. Corner Market 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Kelleher & Browne 

THE IRISH TAILORS 

716 MARKET— Opposite Third— 33 GEARY 

NEW FALL SUITINGS 

ALL SUITS ARE MADE IN OUR OWN 
SHOP BY SKILLED UNION TAILORS. 




They are paid by the week. 
No piece work. 
SUITS TO ORDER FROM $30.00 TO $50.00 

C. BREINING, Marine Representative 



JORTALL BROS. EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 
206 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Dougla* 5348 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



HOTEL SANTA FE 

684 FOLSOM STREET 
Near Third Street 

100 all sunny furnished rooms. Elec- 
tric light, hot and cold water. Rates, 
25c to 75c per day, $1.50 to $3.00 per 
week. Baths. Phone Home J 4230. Open 
a_U_ night- „,,,.,,.,,.,^,.,^^,--^.,-,-,..,,.^^ 
Phone Kearny 2503 

HOTEL COLCHESTER 

259 East St., Cor. of Jackson 
Rates: 30c per Day up, $1.75 per 
Week up. 

Hot and Cold Water In EJvery Room. 
Free Baths and Showers. 

PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 

We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 
Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Union Label Paper and Envelopes 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

Union-made Shoes 

HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING 

GOODS, ETC. 
Fair Prices. Reliable Goods. 

50 East St., and 4 Mission St., 
San Francisco 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



FurnitureMovingby Motorcar 

San Francisco and 
Suburban Towns 



FORSMANN & HUSEBY 
55 Market St. Phone Douglas4400 

Anchor House 

S. PETERSON, Prop, 

FURNISHED ROOMS 

Reading Room. Electric Lights. 
495 THIRD ST. San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5390 



C. Hansen, G. Olsen, J. Johnson 
and J. Nolan are requested to call 
at the P. C. S. S. Co.'s office for 
money due for clothing lost in steam- 
er Queen. 

William Moran, who left Buffalo 
forty-two years ago, at the age of 
12 years, is inquired for by his 
sister. Address Mrs. Catherine Mo- 
ran Fossett, 421 Normal avenue, Buf- 
falo, N. Y. 

Charles Harold Allen, who has 
served as an apprentice in a British 
ship, age about 21 years, medium 
height, brown hair, last heard of in 
San Francisco November 9, 1911, is 
anxiously inquired for by his father. 
Please notify British Consul-General 
at San Francisco. 

Nils Nielsen, No. 204, a native of 
Norway, born 1862, on the Pacific 
Coast since 1892, was last in the S. 
S. Wilhelmina. Inquired for by Mrs. 
Lina Svensen, 852 Treat Ave., San 
Francisco. 

Will John O'Brien, Walter Sin- 
yard J. Halvossen, Fred Weber or 
W. Hansen, who were on the 
schooner "Albert Meyer" last Janu- 
ary when W. Blodsing got hurt 
leaving Santa Rosalia, please commu- 
nicate with F. R. Wall, attorney for 
Blodsing, at 324 Merchants' Ex- 
change, San Francisco. 

W. Kahlberg, No. 688, and C. Mon- 
sen, No. 1964, are inquired for at 
the Standard Oil Company's office, 
at San Francisco. 

Nils Johnson, who was wrecked 
in the American bark Oasis, Sept. 2, 
1887, is inquired for by W. F. Ho- 
henschild, Berkeley, Cal. 

Duncan Carmichael, a native of 
Glasgow, last heard of in San Fran- 
cisco about three years ago, is 
anxiously inquired for by his father. 
Address, Seamen's Institute, San 
Francisco. 

Fred Victor Ford, a native of Eng- 
land, aged 35, of medium height, is 
very anxiously inquired for by his 
mother and little daughter. Please 
notify British Consul General at San 
Francisco. 

Albert Smith, a native of Cork, Ire- 
land, who left the American ship 
John C. Meyer, on Feb. 20, 1911, 
is very anxiously inquired for by 
his wife. Please notify British Con- 
sul General at San Francisco. 



C. J. SWANSON 

CLASSY CLOTHIER 

HATTER AND FURNISHER 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

UNIFORMS 

Gold Braids and Gold Wreaths of 
All Descriptions 

119 EAST STREET 

Between Merchant and Washington 

SAN FRANCISCO - CALIFORNIA 

Phone Douglas 1082 
Home Phone C-3486 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION liADC 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., NANUrACTURERS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Douglas 1660 



^VWW^^W^^V^VSA^N^^VS/WN/N/^^S/WVWSA/W 



BOSS-LHOAD 



OVERALLS 

DEMAND THE BRAND 



Neusiadter Bros. 

5AN FRANCISCO NE.W YORK PORTLAND 



Honolulu Letter List 



Labor News. 



Amundsen, Albert 
Albrecht, Clarence 
Bredsen, John 
Berthold, Willy 
Christensen, Theo- 

dor 
Douglas. Sam 
Darlln, Harry 
Dahlin, H. 
Bkstrom, Geo. 
Fredrlksen, Rudolf 
Greenace, Charles 
Hahn, John H. 
Hansen, L. 
Holm, H. John 



Langer, Robert 
Lundqulst, Alex. 
Matheson, Louis 
Munze, Dick 
McPherson, Louis 
Morgan, Hugh 
Nystrom, R. 
Norrls, Ned 
Roos, B. 

Rosbeck. Gustav 
Slmonsen, Fred 
Saunders, Wm. J. 
Slevert, Hermann 
Swanson, Martin 
Smith, John 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Will August Eklund, Fred Weber, 
G. W. Schrej, or any other seaman 
who was on the Albert Meyer at the 
time W. Bladsing was hurt leaving 
Santa Rosalia last January, please 
communicate with F. R. Wall, 324 
Merchants' Exchange. 

W. A. Goodrich, who left the Brit- 
ish ship Puritan at San Francisco, 
February 6, 1911, is inquired for by 
the British Consul-General at San 
Francisco. 



E. E. Roberts, a member of the 
labor group in Congress from Ne- 
vada, has been renominated. 

The Filipino authorities were re- 
sponsible for letting the contract for 
the building of the transport Merritt 
to a Chinese firm, according to a 
communication from the Secretary 
of War which has been received by 
the San Francisco Labor Council. 

The Web Pressmen on the three 
Atlanta newspapers went on strike 
August 31 after failing to negotiate 
a new wage scale with the news- 
paper owners, the old agreements 
expiring on the date mentioned. 
About forty or fifty men are af- 
fected. 

Twelve hundred men, the majority 
of them miners, went on strike on 
September 17 at the four collieries 
operated at Cumberland, Vancouver 
Island, by the Canadian Collieries 
(Dunsmuir), Limited. The whole of 
the extensive plant at the mines is 
shut down. 

The colored women of Decatur, 
111., wives of union men, have or- 
ganized an independent women's 
union label league. So far as is 
known this is the first auxiliary of 
colored women in the country and 
it is expected that much good will 
be accomplished among the colored 
population of this city. 

Reports from every State in the 
Union are to the effect that Labor 
Sunday and Labor Day were more 
generally observed this year than at 
any previous time in the history of 
tlie American labor movement. This 
fact indicates that the activity among 
members of organized labor is gen- 
eral throughout the country. 

Katherine Williamson, a member 
of the Typographical Union for 
twenty-nine years, is an aspirant for 
Congressional honors from the State 
of Colorado. This State, as is 
known, has woman suffrage, and 
women take a lively interest in 
politics. Miss Williamson is a can- 
didate for the nomination on the 
Democratic ticket, and the primaries 
Democratic ticket. 

The superintendent of the Minne- 
sota St;ite free employment bureati 
has issued a report covering the 
year, .\ugust 1, 1911, to August 1, 
1912. It shows that in three cities — ■ 
St. Paul, Minneapolis and Duluth — 
the bureau has secured positions for 
59,473 persons. The appropriation 
for the conduct of this character of 
work was only $10,000, yet the re- 
sults shown are highly gratifying. 

The contractor who builds the 
New York State building on the 
Panama-Pacific Exposition grounds 
at San Francisco must comply with 
the New York State eight-hour law. 
An opinion to that effect was ren- 
dered by Attorney-General Carmody 
at Albany. He holds that the eight- 
hour law is not confined in its 
operation to New York State work 
carried on within State limits. 

William Hughes, a member of the 
labor group in Congress for a num- 
ber of years, of Paterson, N. J., 
has announced himself as a candidate 
for the United States Senate from 
that State. His petition has been 
filed with the Secretary of State as a 
candidate for the Democratic pri- 
mary nomination. Congressman 
Hughes is the author of the eight- 
hour bill which recently passed 
Congress, and has been active as a 
member of the labor group in all of 
the measures advocated by labor. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 



Poor Mother Again! — Bella — He 
said he would kiss nie or die in the 
attempt. 

Delia— Well? 

Bella — He has no life insurance, 
and I pitied his poor mother. — 
Philadelphia Telegraph. 



A Good Salesman. — Lady — Have 
you any creams for restoring the 
complexion? 

Druggist (tactfully) — Restoring, 
miss? You mean preserving. 

Lady — Yes. Give me half a dozen 
bottles.— P. I. P. 



H.nrdly Sufficient.— "What's the 
matter, Younghubby," asked Oldboy. 
"You look pale around the gills?" 

" I guess it is lack of nourish- 
ment," replied Younghubby. "My 
wife knows 100 ways to use a chaf- 
ing dish, but she can't boil an egg." 
— Cincinnati Enquirer. 

Baiting the Trap. — "What are you 
cutting out of the paper?" 

"About a Nevada man securing a 
divorce because his wife went 
through his pockets." 

"What arc you going to do with 
it?" 

"Put it in my pocket." — Boston 
Transcript. 



Wound Up. — It was Bobby's first 
view of the Statue of Liberty En- 
lightening the World. 

"Why, she's goin 'to throw that 
thing isn't she?" he exclaimed. 

"What makes you think so?" asked 
his mother. 

"Don't you see she's got her arm 
all wound up to let it go?" — Chicago 
Tribune. 



Covering the Situation. — "Is that 
picture one of the old masters you 
were telling me about?" asked Mr. 
Cumrox. 

"Yes," replied the art dealer. "It 
is a genuine treasure: absolutely au- 
thentic." 

"I'll buy it. I already have three 
just like it, and somewhere in the 
bunch I'm liable to hit the original." 
^Washington Star. 



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Established 1888 

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FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXVI, No. 3. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1912. 



Whole No. 2193. 



SEAMEN'S BILL ESPOUSED. 



The Seamen's bill, which passed the House 
of Representatives at the late session of Con- 
gress, had several able champions. Inasmuch as 
further hearings upon the bill will be held by 
the sub-committee of the Senate Committee on 
Commerce before the next Congress convenes, a 
few of the best speeches made for the bill will 
be published in these columns from time to 
time. 

On July 22, while the bill was under consid- 
eration by the House of Representatives, the 
Honorable James D. Post of Ohio made the 
following convincing address: 

Mr. Speaker: The bill under consideration is 
one of vital importance. There are many sub- 
jects before the country demanding legislation. 
No one is of greater importance than the re- 
building of our merchant marine and regaining 
our commercial independence, put to hazard and 
lost by the War of the Civil Rebellion. Since 
that time our merchant marine, so far as it re- 
lates to transoceanic commerce, has been in a 
state of decadence. Agriculture, manufacture, 
and commerce are interests of great national im- 
portance; but commerce includes navigation, and 
it can not be conducted without it. All of these 
great factors are essential to the public weal, 
and none should be sufifering for legislative aid. 

Since the close of the Civil War a course has 
been pursued by indifferent captains command- 
ing the ship of state which has resulted in great 
national loss and disadvantage, so that now, 
while we excel in agriculture and manufactures 
in the ports and marts of the world, we are 
practically devoid of a merchant marine, except 
in our coastwise trade. By proper navigation 
laws we have amply provided for our coastwise 
trade, and its commerce is carried exclusively 
in American bottoms. 

But why should we not have our share of the 
deep-sea commerce of the world? Every nation 
should have its own shipping to carry its own 
commerce, at the very least, not to say it would 
be most desirable to go farther and assist in the 
carriage of other nations. To carry our own 
commerce in bottoms flying our own flag would 
give us a commercial independence that woidd 
i)e a very strong security for political freedom. 
It would bring to us an independence in trade 
relations we do not now enjoy. Our prosperity 
must always depend to a very large degree on 
freedom of industrial development. To be pros- 
perous we must embrace equal opportunities 
with other nations in all industrial enterprises 
and place ourselves upon equal opportunities 
with them, h'or more than a half a century we 
have been dependent upon other nations almost 
exclusively in the deep-sea trafific. .\ nation that 
is dependent necessarily lacks in liberty and 
loses in opportunitv and power. Its dependence 
compels it to submit to untold imjiositions. and 
subiects it to the voracious rapacity of rivals 
and extortions of commercial competitors. We 
are now so dependent since the decline of our 
merchant marine that more than 90 per cent, of 
our foreign commerce is carried by foreign ship- 
ping. This is a deplorable situation respecting 
our foreign intercourse. If we were so unfor- 
tunate as to engage in war with any of the 
great jiowers, our ships engaged in foreign com- 
merce would be inadequate for transport service. 
We are now in the sad plight of being unable 
to carry on foreign war or commerce for lack 
of shipping facilities. The goods we make arc 



carried in foreign ships. The wares we buy 
abroad are brought to our ports under foreign 
flags. We can make and purchase goods and 
expend millions to provide docks, wharves, and 
safe harbors; we can place a light upon every 
point that juts into the ocean on our thousands 
of miles of coast as signals of danger; we can 
erect a chain of radiotelegraphic stations from 
Penobscot to Brownsville and from San Diego 
to the Arctic Circle; and do all this for the use 
and benefit of foreign craft engaged in carry- 
ing our merchandise to foreign markets and 
bringing foreign goods to our shores. These 
public utilities are valuable aids to our coast- 
wise shipping, which is amply protected by our 
navigation laws, and we should place ourselves 
in a position to enjoy their benefits by an ade- 
quate American deep-sea merchant marine. Con- 
gress should stimulate the sentiment in favor 
of an American merchant marine and in favor of 
a policy which will make the American flag 
more often seen in all of the ports of the world. 
It is the universal regret of Americans traveling 
abroad that the flag is not more often seen in 
the foreign carrying trade. 

The pending measure, known as the Seamen's 
bill, is one of the several measures proposed to 
restore the flag in the great carrying trade upon 
the high seas; it is a measure, intended in some 
degree to restore our lost prestige in this branch 
of the world's commerce and to uplift our mer- 
chant marine. There are other measures pend- 
ing having in view the same purport — the bill 
to regulate radio communication and the free- 
ship bill. 

The bill under consideration has three main 
features. It is proposed to elevate the condi- 
tion of the seamen in all the branches of the 
service so as to induce the American boy to go 
to sea, a condition most devoutly desired to be 
consummated. The restrictions surrounding the 
seamen, .some of them originating in feudal 
times, contained in our navigation laws are so 
intolerable that Americans, except in our coast- 
wise trade, have quit the sea. To eliminate 
some of these restrictions, to make the life of 
the seaman conform more nearly to rtiodern 
civilization, to make the condit'ons of life on 
land and sea more nearly equal, is sought to be 
effected bv the pending bill. No one will deny 
that the American seaman does not receive at 
the hands of existing law the treatment that 
men ashore expect, demand and receive. We 
must modernize our navigation laws and make 
them accord with existing conditions and bring 
tlicm within the American conception of person- 
.-il liberty. 

The condition of the seaman must be lifted 
from that which he now occupies, a serf tied to 
the ship. Under existing law he can be arrested 
and put in irons for deserting the ship, when 
such desertion amounts only to a breach of his 
contract. On shore such infraction is remedied 
by civil action for damages only. On sea the 
breach is penalized and the poor sailor is often 
put in irons at the mere whim of the master. 

The right of the master to "flog" a seaman 
for disobedience to orders is a relic of the dark 
ages, and is nowhere tolerated on shore. No 
vessel engaged in the ocean-going trade should, 
not only for the safety of the passengers but 
for the safety of the crew as .veil, be permitted 
to clear a port, without a sufficient crew for her 
safe navigation. The crew should be wholly 



efficient. The great transatlantic and Pacific 
steamships, floating palaces of the sea, equipped 
in luxuriance and with a lavish hand, to accom- 
modate the elegant tastes and refinements of 
elite passengers, should be provided with suit- 
able quarters for the comfort of those who are 
responsible for their safe navigation. Let me 
give you a concrete example. I call your atten- 
tion to the existing law which provides for the 
quarters of the sailors and firemen in the fore- 
castle. It is the place provided for them in 
which to live, eat, and sleep when off duty. This 
space is 6 feet long, 6 feet high, and 2 feet wide. 
Custom has placed the small bunk in this small 
place. Space is valuable for storing cargo, for 
swimming pool, and the dance pavilion. The 
space allotted to the sailor or fireman is sacri- 
ficed for the luxuriant quarters of officers and 
passengers, and is so uncomfortabe that one of 
the witnesses before the committee described it 
as "too large for a coffin and too small for a 
grave." The forecastle is so limited in space 
that it has been dubbed "the glory hole." The 
law is an inheritance of olden times and should 
be discarded as quickly as possible. 

The bill under consideration provides 100 cubic 
feet of space, room enough to stand up, lie 
down, and turn around. The marine architects, 
in their eager desire to excel in luxuriance, have 
entirely overlooked the comfort and welfare of 
the crew and the salient fact that they have 
intrusted to their care precious freight of human 
lives. 

Most maritime nations of Europe have made 
the forecastle space 6 feet by 6 feet by 3 feet, 
108 cubic feet. 

The bill under consideration provides for 
suitable washing outfits and for suitable space 
for the crew to pass from the forecastle to the 
decks; it provides that the sailors shall be di- 
vided into two and the firemen into three watch- 
es, and that each watch shall alternately perform 
the work ordinarily incident to the sailing and 
management of the vessel; that while in safe 
harbor no seaman shall be required to do any 
unnecessary' work on Sunday or legal holiday; 
that the seaman engaged in coastwise trade shall 
be paid his wages within two days after his 
discharge or termination of his services under 
the ship's articles; and in the transoceanic serv- 
ice within 24 hours after the cargo has been 
discharged; he will be entitled to receive one- 
half the wages due him at every port where the 
vessel takes on or discharges cargo; when the 
voyage is ended he will be entitled to his full 
pay. If the vessel while in a foreign port is 
in an unsuitable condition to go to sea on 
account of leakage or a lack of suitable equip- 
ment or men to properly man her, a majority 
of the crew can procure redress through the resi- 
dent consul. He can compel his lodging place 
in the vessel to be properly lighted, heated, 
drained, ventilated, and protected from weather 
and sea and shut ofif from effluvium or cargo or 
l)ilgc water; he need not be flogged, and all 
forms of corporal punishment arc abolished; he 
is prohibited from receiving his wages in ad- 
vance; no one except grandparent, parents, wife, 
sister, or children can take from him an allot- 
ment of his wages. This latter is a stroke at the 
so-called advances for board of seamen while 
waiting in port for the vessel to take on cargo 
.'ind depart, and has been subject to great abuses. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



The system was abolished in our coastwise trade 
by an act of the Congress in 1898. 

If we enact this bill into law, the seaman's 
wages will be exempt from attachment or ar- 
restment in any court. Nearly every State in 
the Union has exempted the wages of labor from 
attachment or execution. Some States have 
limited the amount that shall be exempt, and 
some have limited the time in which wages may 
be attached. In this provision we are simply 
following the humane policy recognized almost 
universally in favor of the wage earner in the 
land. Is a seaman entitled to any less consid- 
eration than the landsman? His life is filled 
with the monotony of the sea; his environments 
are encompassed by the waters; and his' labors 
are full of drudgery. 

The bill provides further for the proper man- 
ning of the vessel in that 75 per cent, of the 
deck crew shall be able seamen. An able sea- 
man is one who has had three years' service at 
sea. This provision will add to the efficiency of 
the service and inure to the safety of the crew 
and passengers. 

Every vessel of 300 registered tons and less 
than 1,500 tons will be compelled to carry in hcr 
crew an American boy, and if more tjian 1,500 
tons register two American boys. Ninety-five 
per cent, of the crews of vessels engaged m 
deep-sea traffic that fly the American flag are 
foreigners. Before the decadence of our mer- 
chant marine the decks of our vessels teemed 
with native seamen. To restore this condition 
is one of the objects of the bill. 

A new feature to American maritime law is 
proposed, to the effect that in the encj not less 
than 75 per cent, of the crew of a vessel shall 
be able to understand any order given by the 
officers of the vessel. All of these provisions 
are for the purpose of adding to the efficiency 
of the crew; to provide additional safeguards 
for the safety of passengers; to make life at sea 
more comfortable and endurable; to induce the 
American boy to enter the seafaring life, and to 
cause the American seaman when once in the 
service to remain there, that in the end we may 
rescue our decadent merchant marine from the 
sad plight into which it has fallen. 

If we can compel better quarters for our sea- 
men; establish "watch for watch," so as to fur- 
nish requisite rest; prohibit "crimping"; prevent 
our seafaring men from being "placed in irons" 
for the mere breach of a contract, and thereby 
place him upon an equality with laborers on the 
soil; compel the foreigners to acquire our 
language so as to correctly understand orders 
given in English; require 75 per cent, of the 
crews to be able seamen; enforce the apprentice- 
ship of American boys upon our vessels, we cer- 
tainly have taken a step forward in the advance- 
ment of our merchant marine and made life 
more easy for those citizens engaged in its 
perils. 

.•\s I said before, the bill has three main 
features: 

The second feature has for its object the im- 
provement in safety of life and property at sea. 
These features of the bill I have already pointed 
out in detail. 

On the 15th of June, 1904, the excursion boat 
General Slocum, plying the waters of New York 
Harbor and Long Island Sound, was burned to 
the water's edge. More than a thousand men, 
women, and children lost their lives in the fright- 
ful holocaust. It was one of the most terrible 
marine tragedies of all time. In the confusion 
following the breaking out of the fire hundreds 
of men, women, and children, caught like rats in 
a trap, in the great tumult and pandemonium 
that reigned supreme, were burned to a crisp 
aboard ship. Hundreds of others, burned and 
scorched until frantic, rushed into the surround- 
ing water, only to meet death by drowning. 
The scenes of that terrible marine tragedy are 
too horrible even at this late day to contem- 
plate, and its horrors will never be forgotten. 
The memory can not efface the frightful scenes 
that ensued while the excursion steamer was 
being consumed by the flames. Its sickening 
details leaves a lasting impression upon the 
memory and they can not be forgotten. So 
terrible were the scenes there enacted that 
some of the victims who escaped lost their rea- 
son and have been compelled to spend their re- 
maining days in asylums. And what was the 
cause? Above all others was the inefficiency of 
the crew. They were raw deck hands not drilled 
in the use of the fire apparatus. In that critical 
moment they knew nothing only to save them- 
selves. The life preservers were wholly worth- 
less, having been permitted to decay. The fire 
apparatus was rotten and useless. Who can say 
that if the Slocum had been manned with an 
efficient crew, these life preservers and the fire 
extinguishers would have been properly looked 
after and cared for and replaced with those in 
perfect working order, that if the crew had been 
such as we seek to provide for in this bill that, 
instead of trying to save themselves, they might 
have extinguished the fire that tolled so many 
precious lives and have prevented one of the 
most heartrending events of all history. 

We appointed a commission to inquire into the 
causes of the Slocum tragedy. There was an 
actual loss of 955 out of 1,358 passengers, while 
there was only a loss of 2 out of a crew of 
30. The commission reported: 

"The inefficiency and poor quality of the crew 
of this vessel, doubtless typical of the majority 
of crews on excursion boats, is one of the es- 



sential facts that caused the loss of so many 
lives." 

Upon the language requirements of the bill I 
want to call attention to the loss of the City of 
Rio de Janeiro. She carried a crew of 84 China- 
men and was officered by white men. But two 
of these officers could speak the language of 
the Chinese. The steamship was homeward 
bound from Hongkong to San Francisco. Upon 
entering the bay at San Francisco, on February 
22, 1901, she struck a shoal of rocks between 
the Golden Gate and the harbor and sank within 
20 minutes, carrying down a large number of 
passengers and crew, with her cargo. She en- 
tered the harbor in a dense fog; it was very 
dark, but the water was smooth. She carried 
211 persons and 11 lifeboats. Her equipment 
and apparatus were in good condition. Five 
minutes would have been ample time to have 
loaded and lowered her boats, yet but only 3 of 
the 11 boats were lowered into the water, and 
only three passengers were taken aboard any of 
the boats. The boatswain and two firemen were 
the only two officers who could give orders in 
the Chinese language to the crew. The result 
was that the orders of the officers had to be 
communicated by the boatswain or by the chief 
fireman by signs or signals. It was utterly im- 
possible for two officers to communicate with 
the crew in the emergenc5^ The crew was not 
drilled in the matter of lowering boats, and 
under these conditions all were practically help- 
less. The United States Supreme Court held — 
"that the ship was insufficiently manned, for the 
reason that the sailors were unable to under- 
stand and execute the orders made imperative 
by the exigency that unhappily arose and re- 
sulted so disastrously to life, as well as to 
property." 

Had 75 per cent, of the crew been able to 
understand the English language there was 
ample time to have filled and lowered the boats 
and thus have prevented the frightful and crim- 
inal loss of life. 

The Titanic disaster is too recent to dwell 
upon its terrible results. She carried on board 
on her initial trip 2,223 persons, of whom 1,515 
were lost and only 706 saved. Her crew num- 
bered 899 persons. 

The evidence before the Committee on Com- 
merce in the United States Senate discloses that 
she was c(iuippcd with 16 lifeboats and 4 collap- 
sible, with a total capacity of 1,176 persons. The 
crew had never been drilled in the handling of 
davits or lowering of the boats. It is not clear 
that all of the lifeboats were loaded and low- 
ered, one of the lifeboats being unaccounted for. 
More than four hours elapsed from the time the 
Titanic received her death blow before she sank, 
and no one would question the fact that she had 
ample time in which to lower all of her boats 
and properly load them, but the evidence dis- 
closes that there was great indecision among 
the crew; they did not seem to know how many 
were necessary to man each boat, and there was 
a failure to utilize all lifeboats to the capacity 
for safety. Only 706 were taken off. A very 
few of the lifeboats were overloaded, while many 
of them were only partially filled. Proper ef- 
ficiency in the crew of the Titanic might have 
saved 474 souls. This, the greatest of all marine 
tragedies, exemplifies the necessity for strict 
laws and regulations in regard to promoting 
the safety of passengers and crew at sea. 

We might multiply these illustrations, but it 
is useless. It may be said that these examples 
are noted exceptions, but I want to call atten- 
tion to the fact that in the fiscal year of 1910 
there were losses of life upon 262 American ves- 
sels, entailing a loss of 563 lives. These vessels 
either foundered, stranded, were in collisions, 
or there was loss of life from other causes, and 
the sum total might be charged up to inef- 
ficiency. 

As the law now stands the shipowner can go 
into the mountains of Pennsylvania and hire 
men wholly without experience and intermingle 
them with men who have been to sea long 
enough to absorb some of the ethics and tradi- 
tions of the calling. And this or the li1<e is not 
infrequently done. And then we exploit about 
"the safety of the sea" and overlook entirely 
the efficiency of the crew. 

This bill is not opposed to the interests of the 
shipowner. The decadence of our over-sea car- 
rying trade is due to two causes. 

We can not build ships in this country as 
cheap as they can be constructed in the foreign 
yards. The cost of ships is, then, an item in 
favor of the foreign shipowner, and in order to 
put the domestic owner upon an equal footing 
with his foreign competitor we must equalize 
this difference in cost. How are we to accom- 
plish this? One of the bills now pending upon 
the House Calendar is the free-ship bill. Out- 
side the difference of wages between the foreign 
and domestic yards, we can furnish cheaper ma- 
terials to our shipbuilders than the foreign yards 
can obtain them for. It is proposed to give free 
material for the construction of ships to our 
builders and in that way e(|ualize the cost to 
the American owner. Can anyone doubt that 
the means to be employed will not justify the 
ends sought to be accomplished? With free ma- 
terial to enter into the construction of domestic 
ships our shipbuilders will undoubtedly be com- 
pensated for the difference in wages here and 
abroad. Solve the wage problem, and we should 
be able to purchase ships in our own yards 
cheaper than to take them off of foreign ways. 

The second obstacle to be overcome is the 



difference in wages of an .American crew and 
the wages of the foreign crew. The cost of 
victualing the ship is as cheap or cheaper here 
than abroad. Fuel is as accessible and no great- 
er burden. How. then, are we to equalize the 
wage problem? It must not be forgotten that 
the American seaman is more capable and more 
efficient than his foreign competitor. He can 
and does accomplish more in a given time, and 
this is a factor in the problem of equalization. 
This hill seeks to abrogate the treaties and laws 
under which seamen on foreign vessels are im- 
prisoned in the United States at the behest of 
the masters of those vessels. The master, as 
the law now stands, has a sort of peonage 
upon the members of his crew. He can throw 
them in prison and keep them in bondage until 
ready to depart, and then compel their return to 
his ship. By this barbarous process he is en- 
abled to enforce obedience to the ship's articles 
and retains his crew for the round trip. Under 
such a law the seaman is not the owner of his 
body but is a slave to the ship. Abolish the 
law, and the foreign seaman when he lands in 
our ports can refuse to return unless he is paid 
the price of an American seaman. The master 
can not return without men to safely navigate 
Iiis ship. He is in an American port, and before 
he can return he must engage his crew in the 
American market and at its wage. No one will 
question but that he will be obliged to pay the 
wages demanded by American freemen. The 
foreign seaman can require the American wage 
or refuse to make the return voyage. Can any- 
one doubt but that these conditions will equalize 
the scale of wages? The American shipbuilder, 
with his free materials selling upon an e(iuality 
with his foreign competitor, the owner navi- 
gating his vessel on an equality with his foreign 
competitor, we should soon expect to find the 
-American boy coming back to the sea instead of 
drifting from the sea; we should soon expect 
to see our merchant marine rejuvenated, plow- 
ing every sea in every clime and the flag of 
freedom waving in every commercial mart and 
port in the world. 



WORLD'S PRODUCTION OF BEER. 



According to statistics compiled by the 
.\ction Economique, the world's produc- 
tion of beer in 1910 was 8,003,754,765 gal- 
lons, of which amount at least 7,925,000,- 
000 gallons were consumed. The United 
States occupied first place among the beer- 
producing countries of the world, with an 
output of 1,908,010,377 gallons. Germany 
was second, with 1.703,666,460 gallons, 
manufactured by 13,186 breweries, 4,783 
bavarian breweries producing 482,221,882 
gallons of this total. Great Rritain, with 
1,479,352,280 gallons, ranked third, and 
Austria-Hungary was fourth. 

The manufacture of beer is an important 
industry in Belgium, there being 4,000 
breweries in operation, and this country 
stood fifth as to production in 1910, with 
422,672,280 gallons, closely followed by 
France, with 417,388,870 gallons. Russia's 
output in 1910 was 232,470,000 gallons; 
next in order of importance, but with very 
much smaller quantities, came Denmark, 
Switzerland, and Sweden. 



In the customs statistics of Xewchwang 
for l'-)\\ there appears as a separate item 
under the heading of paper an importation 
of 4.211,872 pounds of old newspapers, 
valued at $71,138. This is a new feature. 
Tliese old newspapers, which appear to be 
mostly British, are in extensive demand 
in the Newchwang district for wall paper 
for native houses and cottages. Apart 
from this new development, the importa- 
tion of foreign paper was somewhat less 
in value, though more in bulk, than in 
1910, but the difference is far more than 
balanced by a largely increased importa- 
tion of paper of native manufacture. The 
local Chinese newspapers have enormouslv 
increased their circulation during the year ; 
this is doubtless tlie reason for a greatly 
enhanced demand for printing paper, both 
of native and of foreign make of cheap 
ciualitv. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases! 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



West Virginia Coal Miners. 

Recently an article appeared in the Balti- 
more Sun from a staff correspondent, deal- 
ing with the grievances of the miners in 
the Kanawha and Cabin Creek districts. 
The writer states that the question of wages 
is not the only one involved in the con- 
test. The operators claim that the Pitts- 
I)urg district has .02 of a cent per ton 
differential over the Kanawha field. This 
fact, however, is computed upon erroneous 
premises. The Pittsburg figures are based 
upon the short ton of 2,000 pounds, while 
the Kanawha figures are based on the long 
ton of 2,240 pounds, which, when figured 
out according to correct mathematics, gives 
the Kanawha field a favorable differential 
of 6.5 cents per ton. The company store 
and the company houses are other features 
which have aggrieved the miners. While 
the company claims it is not obligatory for 
the men to purchase their supplies at the 
companies' stores, yet it goes without say- 
ing that men are not given continuous em- 
ployment who do not patronize the com- 
pany store, and it is impossible to procure 
living quarters adjacent to the mines with- 
out renting company houses. One operator 
in summing up the difficulties said : "Labor 
is a mere pawn in the game." The increase 
demanded by the miners is only 2j/^ cents, 
a ton for mining and other proportionate 
increases for men whose work is not the 
actual digging of coal. Aside from the 
demands for an increase, the miners also 
insist on reform in the system of docking, 
the employment of the check weighman, 
removal of postoffices from company stores, 
permission for the men to trade where they 
please, the payment of wages in cash every 
two weeks, payment for the mining of coal 
on the basis of the short ton, rental for 
houses based on fair terms of their cost, 
and the nine-hour day, ten hours being the 
length of the day now. The laws of the 
State provide that there shall be a check 
weighman at each coal tipple. The miners 
claim that in all non-union camps in the 
State not a single check weighman is em- 
ployed. The docking system employed by 
the mine operators, according to the writer, 
is to a very large extent abused, one in- 
stance being given where a man had earned, 
according to the present scale, $3.50, and 
he was docked to the extent that he re- 
ceived only $1.08. The houses in which 
the miners live cost approximately $300, 
1)ut $6 a month is the rental — producing 
6 per cent, on an investment of $1,200. It 
is not surprising that the miners in the 
West Virginia non-union fields are putting 
up a desperate fight to change conditions, 
and it is to be hoped that they will be suc- 
cessful. 



Parcels Post News. 

The Postoffice Department officials are 
taking exceptions to statements which have 
been made to the effect that the new par- 
cels post system which becomes effective 
the first of next year will increase the gen- 
eral postoffice deficit, and that the burden 
of taxation now borne by the American 
people would be increased. It has been 
stated b}^ these officials that this phase of 
the question has been thoroughly consid- 



ered by the department, and that it was 
found, even by carrying parcels at a rate 
much lower than the express companies, 
the system can be made self-supporting. A 
further statement is made by the officials 
that receipts from the parcels post will be 
sufficient to aid in decreasing the annual 
postal deficit. Arrangements have already 
been made whereby parcels post packages 
may now be exchanged without limit of 
value of the contents of the parcels with 
Australia, Austria, Belgium, Denmark, 
France, Germany, Great Britain, and Ire- 
land, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, and 
Hongkong. Packages from these countries 
valued at more than $100 must conform to 
consular certification or bond. Notification 
to this effect has been sent by Acting 
.Secretary of the Treasury Curtis to all cus- 
toms officers. 



New Department Home. 

The Department of Commerce and Labor 
is to have a big new home in the down- 
town business section of Washington with- 
in the next year. The building will be 
constructed large enough to house all the 
bureaus and divisions now in rented quar- 
ters and is to be leased for a term of five 
years. As is well known, many of the 
bureaus attached to the department are 
scattered in various sections of the city 
and this new move is for the purpose of 
marshaling together in one building the 
entire machinery of the Department of 
Commerce and Labor. It is believed that 
at the expiration of this five years lease 
the proposed big department building will 
have been constructed and then the depart- 
ment referred to will move into the Gov- 
ernment building. 



"Knowledge Is Power." 

Frequently it occurs that interesting 
items are lost in the great volume of mat- 
ter being printed in this age. Recently a 
writer in the London Daily Chronicle in 
dealing with the recent strike of the Welsh 
miners asserted that the reason why the 
Welsh miners were so persistent in their 
demand was due "to the divine discontent 
bred by contact with literature." An ex- 
cerpt from this article is worthy of repro- 
duction, and is as follows : "In former 
times the Welshman had nothing in the 
house but the Bible and 'Jessica's Prayer.' 
Neither of those instruments of culture 
taught him, apparently, to be dissatisfied 
with his lot. But the shilling library has 
penetrated his country, and now the mi- 
ner's library is full of the combustibles." 
Says the writer: 

"You will be sure to find there Carlyle's 
'Heroes and Hero Worship,' perhaps also 
has 'Sartor Resartus.' There will be Tho- 
reau's 'Walden,' Ruskin's 'Unto This Last,' 
and Charles Darwin's 'Origin of Spe- 
cies', something by Adam Smith and by 
Karl Marx. The names of Huxley, Spen- 
cer, Morris, and even Renan may proclaim 
themselves from the backs of well-handled 
volumes. You may even notice the ancient 
names of Aristotle and Marcus Aurelius, 
certainly volumes by modern George Bor- 
row and Richard Jeffries. George Eliot 
(Continued on Page II.) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 

International Seamen's Union of America, 570 
West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

Atlantic District. 

Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union, SI South St 
New York, N. Y. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
Atlantic, 42 South St., New York. 

Inland Seamen's Union, Whitehall, New York. 

Harbor Boatmen's Union, 214 West St New 
York, N. Y. 

Lake District. 

Lake Seamen's Union, 570 West Lake St 
Chicago, 111. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Great Lakes, 71 Main St., Buflfalo, N. Y. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Union of Great 
Lakes, 55 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 
Pacific District. 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 44-46 East St 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
the Pacific, 91 Steuart St.. San Francisco. Cal 

Maruie Cooks and Stewards' Association of the 
Pacific. 51 Steuart St.. San Francisco Cal 

Frtidsco.'^irtr'"^"'^ ^"'°"' '' S'--'^ St.,' San 
^United Fishermen of Pacific, Box 42, Seattle, 

StfuYrt s"t'^ <;^'^ p Steamboatmen's Union, 51 
:5teuart bt., San Francisco. Cal. 

AUSTRALASIA. 

^'29'Fr'i-^'\"r"c' y"'°" °f Australasia: 
^y Erskine St.. Sydney. N. S W 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N Z 

Queens Chambers, Wellington N 7 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland N Z ' 

Larrington, Newcastle, N S W ' 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne,' Victoria 

Seamen s Offices. Port Adelaide. South Aus- 

25 Arcade Brisbane. Queensland. 
Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 
Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 
Prt^iol Offi' ^°.^"'^!""' Queensland. 
Pa o nL'.'' ^^--Jborough, Queensland, 
t-atriot Office. Bundaberg, Queensland. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union Mari- 

vvay"st.,^Hirir'' """^ F''-e'"en's Union. 1 Rail- 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging. Dubois- 
straat 12. Antwerp. Belgium. i-'udois 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin P. O. 16. Germany. ^ 

FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 

scripts Maritimes de France. Marseille, 11 Place 

de la Joliette. ^ 'o-^c 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Quay Videcog. Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Sjomands Forbund. IS Rosenberg gar- 
den, Bergen, Norway. ^ 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundet. Stock- 
holm. Tunnelgatan I B., Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Kobenhavn, Toldbod- 
gade 15, Denmark. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, Kobenhavn. St. An- 
napalads 22, Denmark. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond. Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2. Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing, Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 

ITALY. 

Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare. Genova, Tiazza L. Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 

AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Cesterreichs, Trieste 
Via Boschetto 5, Austria. 

SPAIN. 

Fedcracion Nacional de Obereros de Mar de 
Buques V Puerto, Barcelona Mayor, 44, 2. 1 
(Barceloneta), Spain. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad de Resistencia de Foguistas, Monte- 
video, Calle 25 de Agosto No, 219, Uruguay. 

ARGENTINA. 

Federacion Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



The Labor Council of Sydney, 
New South Wales, resolved recently 
to ask that the Commonwealth and 
New South Wales governments 
should notify in Malta that im- 
inigrants from that island are not 
required in Australia. 

Of the 8,000,000 adult workers in 
regular employment in the United 
Kingdom, it is estimated that over 
4,200,000 earn less than 30s. a week, 
and 960,000 earn 20s. a week or less. 
Educated poverty won't stand that 
for long without kicking over the 
traces. 

One result of the operation of the 
National Insurance Act in England 
is that the Shop Assistants and 
Warehousemen's Union have in- 
creased their membership from 25,- 
000 to 50,000. Other unions have 
increased their membership by from 
10 to 12 per cent. 

London master tailors admit that 
the men's union is being rapidly in- 
creased in numbers since the recent 
strike in the East End. Prior to 
the recent strike, only 1200 out of 
10,000 East End tailors were union- 
ists, but now the unionists number 
95 per cent. 

The workers in the boot trade in 
Wellington (N. Z.), have benefited 
by a new agreement. Instead of 
operatives being in two grades, as 
before, all are to be uniform, and 
will be paid Is. 2d. an hour. This 
represents an increase all round in 
the weekly wage. 

A packed meeting of ladies held 
recently at Waihi, New Zealand, 
concluded with three ringing cheers 
for the strikers and Federation. A 
resolution was unanimously carried 
that "We, the women of this meet- 
ing, pledge ourselves to fight this 
fight to a finish along with the 
workers of Waihi." 

.\n English statistician shows that 
there are more deaths among paint- 
ers than in other dangerous trades, 
and names these chief causes of 
poisoning, in the order of their im- 
portance: (1) Dust from sandpaper- 
ing painted surfaces; (2) dust from 
mixing white lead with oil; (3) dust 
from paint dried on overalls; (4) 
absorption of lead by the mouth 
from unwashed hands; (5) possibly 
fumes from burning off old paint. 

The Western Railway Officers' 
Conference, in consultation with the 
Government, has secured the follow- 
ing concessions: Officers to be 
placed on the same position as other 
civil servants in respect to pensions. 
The minimum wage will be £150 a 
year. Eight hours' system at sta- 
tions to be adopted where practi- 
cable. Arbitration bill will meet the 
demand for an inde[)endent board of 
appeal against the commissioners' 
classification. 

A motion put forward at the Brit- 
ish Trade-Union Congress in favor 
of political action as opposed to 
syndicalism was carried by votes 
representing 1,693,000 members as 
against 48,000. It was clear from 
the discussion that syndicalism could 
find little support. The mover of 
the motion, J. Scddon, "said that 
syndicalism could only become a 
force in a society which had lost 
faith in itself. It was alien to a 
social organism in which politics 
were international as well as na- 
tional and in which all were under 
obligations to every section of the 
community. Under the British flag 
ci>ntrf)l of Parliament. 



Cannon's Clothing Store 

Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

Special Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

Men's Suits Made to Order 
515 FRONT-516 BEACON STS. .... SAN PEDRO 



M. BROWIN 

THE SAN FRANCISCO CLOTHING STORE AND OUTFITTER 

EXCLUSIVE AGENT FOR 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

427 HROINT SXWEET SAIN PEDRO 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Angeles Beers 
All goods sold at lowest San Francisco prices. We buy direct from Kentucky 
Distilleries and our California Wineries. Seafaring men invited to inspect our stock. 
Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

SEXFARiNG"l«*Eir"orr^HIs"'cOAST ARE FINDING OUT THAT 

S. G. SWANSON 

641 SOUTH BEACON STREET 

Next door to postoffice. Los Angeles "waterfront," 

SAN PEDRO. CALIFORNIA 

Is the man to see when in line for High-Class 

Union Label TAILORING to order only 

SATISFIED CUSTOMERS IS OUR BEST ADVERTISEMENT 




UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 



When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
him. Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 



'*^g;steR^^ 



JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange. N. J. 
MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



WILL BE A MOTHER TO YOU 
Fix your clothes, sew the rips, re- 
pair the tears, fasten the buttons, etc. 
We really clean your clothes by our 

French Dry Cleaning Process 

which is entirely different from the 

mere "sponging and pressing" method. 

We Call and Deliver 

The French Dye WorKs 

612 BEACON STREET 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Martin Olsen, height 6 feet, weight 
225 pounds, missing since Christmas, 
is inquired for by Riggers' and 
Stevedores' Union, Steuart and Fol- 
som streets, .San Francisco. 

John Moen, born 1878 in Norway, 
height 6 feet, is inquired for by his 
father, John Olson Moen, of Lansing, 
Iowa. 

Ole Jenson Lovig (sometimes writ- 
ten Oluf Jenson Lovig), a native of 
Norway, born at Stavanger, Hogs 
ijords; about 54 years old; height, 5 
feet. 9 inches; weight, about 170 
pounds; light complexion; blue eyes; 
last seen at Vancouver, B. C, in 1905. 
Any one able to give any information 
kindly communicate with his brother, 
Jonas Lovig, No. 2414^ 30th St., 
Tacoma, Wash. 

Charles S. Barker, born near St. 
Peter, Nicollet County, Minn., wishes 
to hear from his father, Charles Wm. 
Barker, who left Brookings County, 
S. D., for Oregon, and was going 
sailing again in 1889, and was last 
heard from in Coos County, Ore. Is 
fond of hunting and trapping; has 
been master; sailed out of New York 
City and Boston. Age about 80; 
height about 6 feet; bald headed, 
eyes gray, hair dark. 



San Pedro News Co. 

Sixth and Beacon Streets, San Pedro, Cal. 

Dealers In 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY 

I^os Angeles Examiner and All San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Agents 

Harbor Steam Laundry 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



The United States Shipping Com- 
missioner at Philadelphia, Pa., re- 
quests the following named seamen to 
communicate with him: Gust Leyrle, 
arrived at Philadelphia, October 2, 
1908, on ship Dirigo; Gustav Mattson 
and Victor Wilson, on schooner 
Charles Davenport, March, 1911. 

George Albert Vaughan, aged 47. 
of Handsworth, Birmingham, Eng- 
land. Was in New York city in 1902; 
worked as steward on New York and 
South American boats. Important. 
Address, Rev. R. C. Cookson, 96 
Monroe street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Herman Bjorckbom Eknas, a na- 
tive of Finland, born 1874, is inquired 
for by his urother Evert Address, 
Sailors' Union. San Francisco. 

Alexander Benson, native of St. 
John, N. F., last heard of in Canada, 
now supposed to be on the Pacific 
Coast, is urgently inquired for by his 
mother. Address, Mrs. A. Benson, 
King's Bridge. St. John's, N. F. 

John West, who was on the 
steamer Horatius in June, 1912, is 
inquired for by P. Ivers, River Dar- 
ling, via Wenthworth, Australia. 
Please notify Sup't., No. 1 State 
street. New York. 

The United States Shipping Com- 
missioner, at New York, is desirous 
of locating the relatives or heirs of 
James Clark, a native of Maine, born 
1854. The deceased has a balance of 
$41.10 due him. 



San Pedro Letter List. 

Antrosen. Karla L.irson, Laurits 

Anderson, Otto -1738Larsen, Elnar A. 



LfU'son, Louis -1008 
Latz, K. 



Airo. Oscar 

Andersen, Ben 

Anderson, J. -1099 Larsen, C. 

Anderson, Victor Michel, Berthell 

-1630 Moulas, Nick 

-■Mexandersen, P. Meyer, William 

.\ndree, E. A. -141U Malmgren, Eric 

.\.spe, T. Machada, Enrique 

-Viuierson, G. Mikeleit, E. (Reg. 
Anderson, Gust -1534 Letter) 

.Anderson, S. Mark, Frank 

Anderson, Fred Markman, H. 

-Vnderson, J. G. Mauchada, Henry 

-Vndcrsen, Harald McGulre, Owen T. 

Brusbard, Ewald Mattson, J. -1388 

Bengtsson. C. -I!t24 Markwardt, Carl 

Beyerle, Rupert Murphy, Ambrose 



Hohnhoff, Harry 
Benson, Charlie 
Brudberg. Henry 
Ban, Martin 
Bredesen, John 
Berg, H. T. 
Bulander, B. B. 
Bergman, E. 
Bloom, Frank A. 



Matisen, Hendrik 
Mellerup, Jens 
Matsen Hemming A. 
Nordman, John D. 
Nilsen. Anders 
Nelsen, C. J. 
Nutman, Harry 
Nielsen, P. W. 
Nordman, Jon 



Bodahl, Hans -1746 Nielsen, Alf -1054 



Boardsen, Ed 
Broders, Hajo 
Buchtman, F. 
Conners, Jack 
Clausen, J. 
Carlsson, A. -1220 
Christensen. H. P. 
Carlson, Dick 
Christophersen, R. 
Doyle. William 
Daugul, Alfred 
ICnstrom, Karl 
Ellis, Jack 
Edgerton. Jack 
Eichel, Erlck 
Ellingsen, Eduard 
Edwards, Walter 
Erickson. Edwnrd 
Frandsen, L. M, 
Fasig, Don 
Olencross. Harry 
Outhre, Raymond 
(iusek, B. 
iJreen, Frank 
Glasse, Gust. 
Geiger, Joseph 
Gotz, Rudolf 
Gustafson, J. 
Grnszewskl, Fritz 
H.iort. Knud 
llelinius, Oscar 
Hannus, Alex 
Ilalto, Waine 
Hoft. Hans 
Ilakonsen, John 
Hansen. Berger 



Nurken, Herman 
Nordstrom, Ben 
Nystrom, Ragnar E. 
Nelson. Nils S. 
Nelson, Anton 
Nelsson, Emil -552 
Norman, L. 
Nielsen, Sivert 
Nelson, Nils 
Olson, P. 
Olsen, Nick 
Olsen, Wm. 
Olsson, Hans 794 
Olssen, H. -714 
Olsen, Martin 
Olsen, O. P. -1141 
Owen, Fred 
Olsen, George 
Osterhahn. J. W. 
Peron, Edmund 
Petterson, Vlggo 

-1322 
Peterson, Henry 
Peterson, Olof (Reg. 

Lr.) 
Pedersen, I'eder 
Potet, Emile 
Peterson, Loui 
Peterson, Patrick 
Ponimer, John 
Petrich, Theodor 
Penningrud, L. 
Rasmussen, Arthur 
Richardson, E. E. 
Reuter, Charles 
Rajala, Victor 
Hendenskog, John Retal, F. O. 
Ilait. Philip Risbeck, Gustav 

Ilrileren. G. .1. Rasmussen. Rasmus 

Hondersen. V. -1631Remerd. J. 
rr.Uvorsen. H. -5t"5 Rutter. Fritz 
House, James E. Swensen. C. E. 

Haggar, P. W. Stammerjohan, Hans 

Ingebretsen, Ingolf Sorensen. J. 
Jones, Auber B. Selking, Ben 



Schafer, Ernest 
Signard, Walter 
Schmid, John -2579 
Schmid, F. 
Sassi, Wilhelm 
Scott, Ed. 
Sorensen. Michael 
Sandstrom, Ivar 



Jones, Harry 
Jones, Arthur 
Jersh, Billy 
Johnsen. Gunnar 
.Ien.=en. J. Frank 
Johnson, Arthur 
Johanssen, FVitz 
.lohnsen, Walter 

John.ssen, C. -2016 Strahle, Chas 
Jacobsen, John (Reg. Letter) 

Johason, Ole Sides. William 

Jacobsen, Anders Sievers, G. 
.lolian.s.son. A. -1874 Schmid, J. 
.lohnson, .\xel J. Swanson, Julius 
Jonassen. C. Sas.son, John 

Johnsen, John Smith, Henry 

Jdhn.son, A.xel Smith, J. S. 

Johnsen. J. K. -1715 Smith. John V. 
Johnson. O. (Capt. Svanson, Ben 
Starr, Reg. Lrr.) Tammi, Emil 
Ii-win, Robert Tomsen, Peder 

Kohlmeister. O. Thorn, Arvid 

Klaes.sen, Karl A. Tollefsen, R. 



Karlsen, .Tacob 
Kumm. Chas. V. 
Kopatz, Oscar 
Kern. Max 
Kilman, Gunnar 
Karlson, R. 
Kuhne, W. 
Kerleau, Alex 

Kosze, Franz (Reg. Zoe, Francois 
L.) Younggren. E. 

Lundmark. Helg© PHOTOS AND 

Larson. Martin -1710 PACKAGES. 

Lewis. George H. Mikeleit, E. 



Torbjornsen, Andrew 
Thorsen, J. 
Togersen. Anton 
Wilson, Harry 
Ward. H. 
T'lappa, Kostl 
Wahrenberg. Otto 
Ziebel, Albert 



Larsen, Martin 
Lange. Ineolf dp 
Ludewig, Edmond 
Leino, Fred 
Lister, W. 



Axelsen, W. 
Boy, Geo. 
Kees, L. 
Manners, C. 
Schroeder, Ernst 



YOU NEED NOT BE BROKE 
WHEN IN SAN PEDRO 

I buy and sell new and second- 
hand goods that have any value. 

I also do Gun and Locksmithing, 
Upholstering and Mattress Making. 

N. MANN 

335 BEACON STREET, San Pedro 
Near 4th Street 



INFORMATION WANTED. 
Emanuel Nyreen. a native of Abo. 
Finland, was member of crew of 
revenue-cutter Dexter, in 1908. Please 
communicate H. H. Rohrbach, New- 
ton Theological Institute, New Cen- 
ter, Mass. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



Advices from Kee]iing to the marine depart- 
ment of the Chamber of Commerce state that 
with favorable weather there is a prospect of 
saving the cargo of the British steamer Dacre 
Castle, from Yokohama for Boston, previously 
reported ashore. 

Mr. Robert Dollar, the well-known shipowner 
of San Francisco, was presented with the free- 
dom of the burgh of Falkirk, Scotland, August 
29th. Mr. Dollar is a native of Falkirk, and 
recently presented the town with a handsome 
granite fountain as a memorial to Sir John de 
Graeme, who was slain in the Battle of Fal- 
kirk, in 1298. 

By the addition of the steamer Texan to its 
Pacific fleet the American-Hawaiian Steamship 
Company will insure a ten-day service on its 
triangular run between San Francisco, the Sound 
and Honolulu. As recently announced, the 
Texan is bringing coal out for the Government 
bunkers at Mare Island, after the discharge of 
which she will load for Hawaii. 

Between 3,000 and 4,000 Russians are assembling 
at Dalny to come to Canada in a specially 
chartered steamer to form a colony in Alberta. 
Arrangements are being made for a special 
steamer to carry as many of the Russian colon- 
ists to Canada as could be accommodated on the 
vessel, and the others will follow in another 
steamer or in parties by the regular liners. 

Actual work on the new $500,000 shipbuilding 
plant at Coquitlam, B. C., began September 11. 
According to specification, the new plant will be 
the most comprehensive on the mainland, for, 
although ships of from 300 to 800 tons will be 
the principal output at the start, the officials ex- 
pect to enlarge the plant after the opening of 
the Panama Canal. Eight and one-half acres 
have been secured. 

Word has been received from Europe that the 
new Blue Funnel liner building for the Liver- 
pool-Pacific service, via the Orient, will be chris- 
tened Txion. The new vessel will be the largest 
in this trade and will replace the Keemun, 
which is scheduled for withdrawal. The Txion 
will be 250 tons larger than the new steamer 
Talthybius, at present the biggest in the fleet. 
The new steamer will be of about 10,500 tons 
register and will have capacity for 14,000 tons 
of freight. 

Real-Admiral Sidney A. Staunton, United 
States Navy, a member of the Commission Ex- 
traordinary to the Courts of Europe, has just 
filed a report with the Navy Department with 
reference to foreign naval participation at the 
Panama-Pacific Exposition. The distinguished 
naval officer visited the Ministers of Marine of 
all European countries and requested the pres- 
ence of naval vessels at San Francisco in 1915. 
In all cases the response was cordial, and the 
visit of the Commission doubtless increased the 
probability of a large naval participation. 

The agent for the Kosmos line at San Fran- 
cisco has been notified that beginning next 
year the company will give an extended service 
from Mediterranean ports to San Francisco and 
the west coast. At present the steamers calling 
at Genoa, Cadiz and Barcelona only come as far 
as Ecuador, where the freight consigned to the 
North Pacific is transferred. On the new sched- 
ule every third steamer will come through from 
the Mediterranean. The Kosmos Company is 
able to give the increased service because of 
new tonnage which has been added to its big 
fleet of carriers. 

The revenue cutter Manning, the first of the 
Bering Sea patrol boats to leave the north, ar- 
rived at Port Townsend on September 25. The 
cutters had instructions to relieve all cases of 
distress that came in view, and the Manning, 
which was close to Kadiak Island when Mount 
Katmai began to shower ashes, carried out her 
orders so well that President Taft sent a letter 
of commendation to Captain K. W. Perry. Ra- 
tions will be issued all winter to the 600 desti- 
tute natives of Kadiak Island and Shelikof 
Strait, and the distribution will be under the 
direction of Lieutenant Keister of the Manning, 
who remained in the north. 

The salvage steamer Salvor, Captain Strat- 
ford, with Captain W. H. Logan and the divers 
and salvage crew of the British Columbia Sal- 
vage Company of Esquimalt, have readied Bal- 
boa and are now engaged in raising the sunken 
Pacific Mail liner Newport. The work is well 
under way, according to cable advices received 
by the marine department of the Chamber of 
Commerce. The Newport, which had arrived at 
the canal port from San Francisco with a large 
cargo of machinery was lying alongside the 
dock about a month ago when the big ware- 
house collapsed and toppled over two sixty ton 
cranes which fell on the deck of the steamer. 
The Newport gradually settled and went down 
in thirty-five feet of water. 

The .Maska-Pacific Steamship Company has 
closed negotiations with the American Mail 
.Steamship Company of New York for the pur- 
chase of their steamer .\dmiral Farragut. The 
vessel will be delivered to her new owners the 
last of this month and made ready for her 
long voyage via Magellan to this port. Captain 



E. P. Bartlett, master of the coaster Watson, 
who is with H. F. Alexander, president of the 
Alaska Pacific Company, in the East, will bring 
the Farragut out from the Atlantic. The vessel 
is to be placed on the San Francisco-Seattle 
route, going into commission in the spring. 
She is a sister ship of the Admiral Sampson 
and has been operated in the fruit-carrying trade 
between New York and the West Indies. 

W. R. Grace & Co., for whom several new 
liners are being built on the Atlantic, have 
announced the names of four of the vessels as 
the Santa Cruz, Santa Clara, Santa Catalina and 
Santa Cecilia. The name of the Santa Cruz 
has been previously announced and she will be 
the first one of the new liners to come to 
this Coast. She is now nearing completion 
and will arrive on the Pacific after the first 
of the year. The four vessels whose names 
are given are being constructed by the Cramps. 
Grace & Co. are also building new steamers 
in Europe for use when the Panama Canal 
is opened. This concern operates extensively 
between the North Pacific and the west coast in 
the lumber and general cargo trade. 

Bringing sealskins valued at over $1,000,000, 
the steamer Homer. Captain Wall, arrived at 
San Francisco on September 27 from the rook- 
eries of the Pribilof Islands via Unalaska. She 
brought 3764 skins, consigned to the United 
States Government, which has control of the 
rookeries. Eighteen passengers, including a num- 
ber of Government employes and employes of 
the trading companies in the north, arrived on 
the Homer. On the voyage north the Homer 
encountered very severe weather and was com- 
pelled to put into Unalaska for coal before 
making the Pribilofs. The voyage home was 
also marked by a mishap. On September 24th, 
250 miles west of Point Arena, the tailshaft of 
the port engine broke, which caused the vessel 
to arrive two days late. 

The steamers plying in the transpacific trade 
and others which call at United States ports 
will hereafter have to carry two wireless op- 
erators and also be equipped with emergency 
auxiliary wireless plants operated with storage 
batteries for use in the event of mishap to 
machinery disabling the dynamos. This is in 
accordance with the new United States regu- 
lations which come into effect October 1st. 
The coaster Senator of the Pacific Coast Steam- 
ship Company is the first vessel to sail equipped 
under the new law. She has two operators 
aboard taking turns at manning the station. 
One or other of the two men will be on duty 
all times, day and night, ready to flash the 
S. O. S. distress call in case of accident or to 
send or receive emergency, business or private 
messages within the range of the apparatus. 

An important addition to the coastwise fleet 
is the steamer John A. Hooper, which was 
launched at the Harlan & Hollingsworth ship- 
yard at Wilmington, Del., a few days ago. 
The new craft will be used by the owners, 
.Sudden & Christenson, in the lumber carrying 
trade along this coast. The large amount of 
2,500,000 feet of lumber can be loaded on the 
steamer. She is 299 feet in- length, forty-four 
feet beam, and 21,6 feet in depth of hold. The 
Hooper is of steel construction and built along 
the most modern lines. There are six compart- 
ments with the bulkhead extending clear through, 
fore and aft. The trin from the Atlantic through 
the Straits of Magellan will begin with Captain 
John Martin, formerly of the steamer Norwood, 
on the bridge. .A.s her first cargo the new 
steamer will bring out coal for the United 
States Government. On arriving here she will 
begin her voyages along the coast between this 
port, Gray's Harbor and San Pedro. 

Applications for civil service examination for 
the position of lighthouse keener and assistant 
keeper in the Eighteenth lighthouse district will 
be received at the new custom-house, San 
Francisco, until October 15th. .Applicants must 
be citizens of the United States, over 18 years 
of ace. The application requires that thev 
furnish a medical certificate coverin-;;; their 
physical condition. .Applicants will not qualify 
if they are not good boatmen. They must 
have had some experience in machine sho)) 
work, handling of machinery, use of tools, etc., 
and must fn'lv state such experience on their 
application blank and accompanying papers. 
Applicants must write a legible band. The 
average rate of pay for keepers is $720 to $1000 
per annum: first assistant keener, $600 to .$800: 
'second assistant l-ppper, $540 to $600: third 
;i'i>;istapt keener, $516; fourth assistant keeper. 
$504. In addition to salary. 30 cents a dav is 
allowed for rations fcash or provisions"), fortv 
gallons of niineral oil and four or five Caccorfl- 
ing to tlie locality) tons of coal annually for 
household use. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an offi- 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims 
of all seafarers careful attention. 324 Merchants' 
Exchange BIdg.. Third Floor, California St., near 
Monteomerv. Telephone, Kearny 394; Home 
C 3832. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America. 

Atniiated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 
and 
INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' FED- 
ERATION. 



THOS. A. HANSON, 
570 West Lake SL. Chicago, III. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 51 South St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Ma.ss., l^A Lewi.s St. 
PORTLAND, Me.. 377A Fore St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St 
BALTIMORE. Md., 802-SO4 South Broadway 
NORFOLK, Va., 221 Water St. 
MOBILE, Ala.. 4 ContI St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 535 St. Ann St 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY. 4 South St. Telephone 1879 

Broad. Night Call 8374 Spring. 
New York Branch. 400 West St. Telephone 5153 
Chelsea. 

Branches: 
BOSTON. Ma.<!s.. 2.S8 Commerel.Tl St. 
NEW ORLEANS. La.. 53 St. Ann St 
BALTIMORE. Md.. ^02-804 South Broadway. 
MOBILE. Ala.. 4 ContI St. 
PHILADELPHIA. Pa., 206 Moravian St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION OF NEW YORK 
AND VICINITY. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK. N. Y., 214 We.st St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL. N. Y. 



LAKES DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, III.. 570 West Lake St. 

Branches: 
BUFFALO. N, Y.. 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR. O., 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND. O.. 1401 W. 9th St. 
MILWAUKEE. Wis.. 133 Clinton St. 
TOLEDO. O., 54 Main St. 
N. TONAWANDA. N. Y.. 152 Main St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR. O.. 992 Day St. 
ERIE, Pa.. 107 E. Third St. 
DETROIT. Mich.. 7 Woodbridge St., East. 
SUPERIOR, Wis.. 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY. Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y.. 70 Isabella St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO. 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave 
PORT HURON. Mich.. 517 Water St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main SL 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O., 1185 W. Eleventh St. 
CHICAGO, III., 445 La Salle Ave. 
DETROIT, Mich.. 7 Woodbridge St., East. 
MILWAUKEE. Wis.. 151 Reed St. 
SUPERIOR. Wis.. 1814 Fourth St. 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y.. 70 Isabella St. 
BAY CITY. Mich.. 108 Fifth Ave. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N Y.. 55 Mnin St.. Tel. Seneca 2J95, 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND. O.. 1401 West Ninth St. 
MILWAUKEE. Wis.. 151 Reed St. 
CHICAGO, 111., 314 N. Clark St. 
ASHTABULA. O.. 74 Bridge St. 
TOLEnO, O.. 54 Main St. 
DETROIT. Mich.. 7 Enst Woodbridge St 
PT. HURON. Mich.. 517 Water St 
CONNEAUT. O.. 922 Day St 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y.. 70 Isnbelln St 
N. TONAWANOA. N. Y.. 15" Main St 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N Third St 
BAY CITY. Mich.. 108 Fifth Ave. 
ERIE. Pa., 107 R. Third St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO. III.. 9142 Mackinaw Ave 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. 44-46 East St. 
Branches: 

VICTORIA. B. C. Old Court Rooms. Riistlon 
Square. 

VANCOUVER, R. C.. Labor Temple. Cor. Homer 
and Diin.smuir. P O. Box 1365 

TACOMA. Wash.. 2218 North 30th St. 

SEATTLE. W.nsh., 84 Seneca St., P. O, Box 65. 

PORT TOWNSEND. Wash.. 114 Qulncy SL P O 
Box 48. -. .> . 

ABERDEEN. Wnsh.. P. O. Box 6 
PORTLANIV Ore.. 51 Union Ave.. Box 2100. 
EUREKA. Cal.. 227 First St.. P. O. Box 64. 
SAN PEDRO, Cal.. P. O. Box 67. 
HONOLULTT. H. T., Cor. Queen and Niiuanu Sts., 
I , O, Box 314. 

(Continue^ on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBUSHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



WALTER MACARTHUR Editor 

PAUL SCHARRENBBRG Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mall - $2.00 | Six months 

Advertising Rates on Application. 



$1.00 



Changes In advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To Insure a prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress all rommunloatlons of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 



Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
44-46 East Street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral Interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL Is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1912. 



Ml'RISONMENT FOR NEGLIGENCE. 



Under date of August 17, the Imperial 
Merchant Service Guild (Masters' and Mates' 
Association of Great Britain), issued a cir- 
cular letter calling attention to the extraordi- 
nary case arising from the wreck of the 
steamer Taboga, on the Pacific Coast of Pan- 
ama, in which considerable loss of life oc- 
curred. 

The Court of Inquiry subsequently held 
to determine the cause and fix the responsi- 
bility for the disaster censured the master 
for neglecting to give personal attention to 
the navigation, while the vessel was close to 
land, and blamed the chief mate for being 
overconfident in his reckoning. 

Not content with this judgment the Pan- 
ama government has detained the master and 
mate over a year pending their trial on a 
criminal charge. Upon trial the jury found 
that the master and mate were responsible 
for the wreck and convicted them of man- 
slaughter. Thereupon they were each sen- 
tenced to twelve years' imprisonment, and 
a heavy fine was also imposed in each case. 

The cases are being appealed, the British 
Foreign Office having provided 100 pounds 
for the purpose, and it is to be hoped that 
upon appeal the verdict and sentence of the 
lower court will be set aside. 

Conviction in these cases appears to have 
been a gross miscarriage of justice. The 
Court of Inquiry, composed of men familiar 
with the business of navigation, and there- 
fore competent to judge the facts, found that 
the officers accused had been "negligent" and 
"overconfident," in other words, that they 
had committed errors of judgment. That 
such errors of judgment unfortunately re- 
sulted in the loss of life is to be regretted, 
but it is neither reasonable nor just on that 
account to hold the officers liable criminally. 

If the judgment of the court be permitted 
to stand, a master or officer of a vessel who 
is unfortunate enough to lose her might as 
well go down with her or commit suicide. 
In the case of the two officers in question. 



either alternative would be preferable to the 
frightful fate awaiting them. 

A twelve years' sentence in a Panama 
jail, climate and conditions of Central Ameri- 
can jails considered, is something no white 
man can hope to survive. 

There seems to be a disposition in this 
country also to make "goats" of the masters 
and officers who have the misfortune to lose 
their vessels, especially if the wreck has 
been accompanied by loss of life, and to load 
upon them all responsibility for such disas- 
ters ; even such as should be rightfully borne 
by the shipowner or the government officers 
entrusted with the inspection of vessels and 
their equipment. 

When the steamer Slocum was burned in 
New York harbor, in 1904, although investi- 
gation into her loss proved conclusively that 
the U. S. Inspector, who inspected her, and 
her owner, were responsible for the lack of 
proper fire fighting apparatus, as well as for 
the fact that the vessel was manned by 
landsmen who knew nothing about the hand- 
ling of fire fighting and life saving equip- 
ment, the master, a man in the seventies, 
was made to take all the blame and to suflFer 
ten years' imprisonment in Sing Sing. 

True enough, he ought not to have taken 
the vessel to sea unless she was properly 
equipped with fire-fighting and life-saving 
apparatus and had on board a competent 
crew of seamen, but if he should have de- 
clined to do so, somebody else who would be 
willing to take the risk, would get his job 
and he would be left on the beach to starve. 

It is but right that officers of vessels should 
realize the responsibility resting upon their 
shoulders, but it is submitted that this will 
not be done by making them feel that if they 
commit an error of judgment which may re- 
sult in loss of life or property, they have 
only the choice between suicide and a felon's 
cell'. 

The public demands of ship's officers the 
highest human qualities, but it is notorious 
that the public does not realize that it is 
under any obligation to the officers. 

This is true of all countries, and perhaps 
most so in the country where the law takes 
from the ships' officers the only eflFective 
means of improving their conditions, the 
right to quit work in unison. 

In consequence their wages and working 
conditions are by no means proportional to 
their skill or the service they render. 

Fortunately for the officers, they are be- 
ginning to realize their condition and with 
this realization will come the remedy. 

Cases such as that of the Slocum and Ta- 
boga, raw as they are, serve at least one 
useful purpose, that of making ships' officers 
realize that there is a lot more to their jobs 
than gold lace and a "handle to their names." 



It is now announced that the Panama Canal 
will be opened for traffic in the fall of 1913, 
and that an opportunity will be given all vis- 
itors to see it this winter before the water 
is turned in. It was an unfortunate feature 
of the French regime under De Lesseps tiiat 
there were repeated prophecies of an early 
completion and repeated postponements. The 
.'\merican authorities have been conservative. 
Their revision of the opening date first an- 
nounced — January 1, 1915 — abridges instead 
of increasing the interval before the great 
waterway is available. So there is no reason 
to doubt the fulfilment of this forecast. 



ABOUT "DEMENTED CREATURES.' 



That eminently respectable journal, The 
Argonaut of San Francisco, is never issued 
without containing at least one article slur- 
ring the organized wage workers. In a re- 
cent issue that organ of snobbery went a 
little further than usual by referring to the 
workingmen and women of San Francisco 
who went to Shell Mound Park for the pur- 
pose of hearing Darrow's Labor Day ad- 
dress, in the following language : "The poor 
demented creatures . . . may be excused 
on the ground of ignorance." 

Now, it has never been denied that men 
are more or less endowed with certain ani- 
mal attributes, in some the courage of the 
lion is most prevalent, in others, the ferocity 
of the tiger, or the cunning of the fox. 
There are some specimens of the human race 
in whom the attributes of the skunk and 
sewer rat are most pronounced. The prox- 
imity of the skunk is always made manifest 
by the pungent odor which emanates from 
its repcUant anatomy. And it requires no 
ultra-sensitive olfactory organs to ascertain 
the whereabouts of the editor of The Argo- 
naut. 

Catering to so-called "society" folks is 
The Argonaut's sole aim and endeavor and 
in fact the only reason for existence. And 
"society" seems to be satisfied with the kind 
of mental sewage which flows through the 
columns of The Argonaut. 

The real calibre of "society" and The 
Argonaut's editor is further elucidated in 
the columns bearing the heading "Vanity 
Fair." in which, by the most vicious in- 
nuendo the character of womanhood is as- 
sailed. Starting with Mrs. O. H. P. Bel- 
mont, Mrs. Margaret Graham of New York ; 
all the working girls of that city ; the women 
bathers of Los Angeles and finishing with 
the Infante Eulalie of Spain, this assassin of 
character and defamer of women, revels in 
his mental wallowing. Thus he goes, from 
the highest to the lowest in the social scale. 
The Infante Eulalie of Spain is no more ex- 
empt from attack than are the poor working 
girls of New York. 

So the reason for the constant vilification 
of the organized workers becomes apparent. 
When the goo<:l name of American woman- 
hood is a shuttlecock for The Argonaut's 
editor, how can he be expected to have any 
respect for the good name of Labor? 



THE RIGHT TO QUIT. 



A correspondent takes exception to an 
assertion contained in a recent Journal edi- 
torial under the caption : "Country Without 
Strikes." Following is the particular lan- 
guage which our correspondent considers 
"somewhat startling" : 

"No one is sent to jail here for refusing 
to continue to work against his will." 

The word "here" in the foregoing sen- 
tence refers to this country in contrast with 
Australia where, under the Compulsory Ar- 
bitration Act, workers are in certain in- 
tances jailed for their refusal to continue 
at work. Our correspondent continues : 

"Now, Mr. Editor, if your statement is true 
why all this anxiety as to the Seamen's bill? 
Where is the slavery of the sea? 

"Did not a number of miners in the State of 
Colorado, not more than two years ago, serve 
jail sentence for refusing to continue to work 
after being enjoined so to do? 

"I believe there is a case of New Orleans 
stevedores or longshoremen which is of this 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



nature. The records of legal proceedings are full 
of cases which will go to prove that men are 
jailed here for refusing to continue at work 
against their will. Hoping that you will explain, 
etc." 

The trouble with our friend is that he has 
taken very Httle interest in the twenty years' 
struggle of the seamen of America to gain 
for themselves the right to quit in any port 
of the world. Our correspondent does not 
seem to know that through the efiforts of 
the organized seamen, the law as it reads 
to-day gives seamen on American ships the 
privilege of quitting their vessel in any Ameri- 
can, Canadian and Mexican port without in- 
curring the danger of imprisonment. In all 
other countries, however, the seaman who 
quits an American ship is still liable to im- 
prisonment for not more than one month. 

When the Seamen's bill (H. R. 22,67Z), 
now pending in the Senate, becomes a law, 
"slavery" or involuntary servitude will have 
been abolished, in all ports of the world, for 
American seamen and for seamen of foreign 
vessels when in any port of the United 
States. 

As to the Colorado and New Orleans 
cases cited by our correspondent, these are 
instances in which government by injunction 
was substituted for the law of the land. If 
men have been sent to jail here for refusing 
to continue at work against their will it was 
not done in conformity with any law on the 
statute books — but in flagrant violation of 
such. That, however, is another story. 

And while we unfortunately have our in- 
junction judges who set aside government 
by law and thus endanger individual liberty 
we should not permit Compulsory Arbitra- 
tion or any new species of slavery to gain a 
foothold in America. 



CARDIFF AND THEREABOUT. 



Following the action reviewed in my last 
letter, the Trade-Union Congress, held at 
Newport (Mon.), acted upon the question 
of Syndicalism. The resolution on the sub- 
ject declared — 

"That this Congress re-affirms its con- 
tinued support of independent working- 
class political action in helping the indus- 
trial fight for a more equitable share of 
the wealth produced, and also declares for 
a larger share of representation, national 
and local, in view of the continued central- 
ization of social and industrial questions in 
the hands of the Government and local 
authorities." 

The debate on this resolution constituted 
the most spirited event of the week's pro- 
ceedings. About twenty delegates took 
part. The attention of the press and pub- 
lic was focused upon the subject. 

A significant feature of the discussion 
was the admission by many of the speak- 
ers that they did not know the real mean- 
ing of the word "syndicalism." The de- 
sire for a definition upon which all could 
agree was voiced very generally. No seri- 
ous attempt was made to supply this need. 

The general trend of the debate followed 
the usual lines of division between those 
who favor and those who oppose the policy 
of the general strike. It was freely de- 
clared that a general strike would be ruin- 
ous to the labor movement. 

The ])olicy of the general strike was not 
advocated with particular vigor or confi- 
dence. The few delegates who leaned in 
that direction contented themselves for the 



most part with a declaration that the power 
of the labor movement could be exerted to 
better advantage in a strike than in polit- 
ical action. 

The resolution was adopted by a vote of 
1,693,000 to 48,000. Judging by the views 
expressed by many delegates, the result 
seems to favor a policy of both strike and 
politics, rather than one of discarding the 
strike in favor of political action. 

Among the resolutions passed in the 
closing hours of the Congress were the 
following: For the nationalization of "land, 
minerals, mines, railways and canals"; for 
a legal minimum wage of 30 shillings per 
week, and for the better manning of ships. 

On the Sx.\\ inst. a public meeting was 
held in Newport, under the auspices of the 
National Sailors' and Firemen's Union. 
There was a large attendance of seamen 
and the public. Councillor Peter Wright of 
Newport presided. The following resolu- 
tion was moved by Comrade C. Bellem, 
seconded by Comrade G. Jackson : 

"That we urge upon Parliament the ex- 
treme necessity of passing legislation to 
compel the adequate and efficient manning 
of all British and foreign ships, with a 
view to minimize the heavy loss of life at 
sea." \ .« i 

Addresses were made by Comrades J. 
Havelock Wilson, E. Cathery, A. Dunlap, 
J. Ilenson. Mr. H. Gosling, of the Thames 
Lightermen, also made an address. The 
writer was introduced and briefly described 
the status of the manning question in the 
United States. 

The resolution was carried, after which 
another resolution was carried, condemning 
a local magistrate for sentencing an official 
of the Union to one month's imprisonment 
for "intimidation." 

At Cardiff on the 9th a complimentary 
dinner and presentation was given in honor 
of the fraternal delegate from the United 
States. The gathering, which was held in 
the Grand Hotel, was attended by about 
one hundred members from the Union's 
branches on British Channel and several 
invited guests. Comrade J. Havelock Wil- 
son presided. 

Comrade Wilson, in a short preliminary 
address, described the present condition of 
the Union and the relations between the 
seamen and shipowners. He concluded by 
proposing a toast to "The King," which 
was duly honored. 

Other toasts were, "Our Guest," pro- 
posed by Comrade James Henson, respond- 
ed to by myself; "National Seamen's and 
Firemen's Union," proposed by Comrade 
George Jackson, responded to by Comrades 
E. Cathery and T. Chambers; "The Vis- 
itors," proposed by Comrade A. Dunlop, re- 
sponded to by Messrs. Nilett and Rooney ; 
"The Plostess," proposed by Comrade M. 
Tearle, responded to by Mrs. Rosser. 

The speeches were interspersed by music 
and songs, the latter rendered by Com- 
rades "Bill" Jones, "Andy" Dunlop, Joe 
Edmonds and George Jackson. 

A very pleasant evening was spent. The 
gathering rose at 11 p. m. with cheers for 
the National Sailors' and Firemen's Union 
and President Joseph Havelock Wilson. 
Walter Macartiiur. 

London, September 11, 1912. 



An American school has been opened 
at Shanghai, China, for both day and 
boarding pupils. 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 30, 1912. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7:.'^() 
p. m., Ed. Andersen presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping fair. A Quarterly Finance Com- 
mittee was elected to examine the Union's 
account for the past three months. 

ANDREW FURUSRTH, Secretary. 

44-46 East St. Bell Phone Kearny 2228. 
Home Phone J 2228. 



Victoria, B. C, Sept. 23, 1912. 
Shipping fair; prospects good. 

ARCHIE KING, Agent. 
Old Court Rooms, Bastion Square. 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 24, 1912. 
Shipping fair. 

JOHN PEARSON, Agent. 
Labor Temple, cor. Homer and Dunsmuir. 
P. O. Box 1365. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 23, 1912. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping dull; pros- 
pects uncertain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 23, 1912 
Shipping poor; prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Port Townsend Agency, Sept. 23, 1912. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping poor; 
prospects poor. 

WALTER MOLLER, Agent. 
229;/l Water St. P. O. Box 48. Tel. 141 J. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 23, 1912. 
Shipping dull; prospects uncertain. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. 2002. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 23, 1912. 
.Shipping good. 

O. DITTMAR, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2100. 51 Union Ave. Tel. East 
4912. 



Eureka Agency, Sept. 23, 1912. 
No meeting: no quorum. Shipping fair; pros- 
pects uncertain. 

JOHN W. ERICKSEN, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 553 R. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 23, 1912. 
Shipping good; prospects good. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 67. Tel. 137, L. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 17, 1912. 
Sliipping good; prospects uncertain. 

CHAS. TAUCER, Agent. 
Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts. P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Head(iuarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 26, 1912. 
Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7 p. m., Ed. .Andersen in the chair. Secretary 
reported shipping fair; plenty of members 
ashore. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 
Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 19, 1912. 
Ko meeting. Shipping fair. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
P. O. Box 1335. 1003 Western Ave. Phone 
Sun Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 19, 1912. 
No meeting. Shipping fair; prospects better; 
ivw men ashore. 

HARRY POTHOFF, Agent. 
P. O. Box 54. 



DIED. 

I.ajcrik Samuel Laning, No. 1699, a native of 
Jatu, Marshall Islands, age 34, died at Victoria, 
P.. C, Sept., 1912. 

Wilhelm Tesch, No. 759, a native of Ger- 
many, age 29, drowned at Yakutat, Ala.ska, 
Aug., 1912. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



*^^* 



ON THE GREAT LAKES, 



Contributed by the Lake Seamen's Union 



*^^* 



WHO ARE THESE MEN? 



The Lake Carriers' Association has 
served notice, through its general counsel, 
Harvey D. Goulder of Cleveland, O., that 
it proposes to bring "seamen" and "fire- 
men" from the Great Lakes to oppose the 
Seamen's bill. The men on the Lakes are 
curious as to who these men are, and are 
asking some pertinent questions on the 
subject. 

Who are the "seamen" and "firemen" 
who will be brought tf) Washington, by 
the Lake Carriers, to say that the sailors 
and firemen of the Great Lakes do not 
want the eight-hour day? 

Who are the marine firemen that will 
submit to being taken to Washington to 
say that the three-watch system is not 
wanted by the marine firemen of the 
Lakes? 

Who are the sailors and firemen that 
will say they have no need or desire for a 
law prohibiting unnecessary work on Sun- 
days or legal holidays? 

Who are these men, these "seamen" 
and "firemen" referred to by Attorney 
Goulder of the Lake Carriers' Associa- 
tion, who are to be persuaded to help the 
shipowners against the best interests of 
every man on board the ships of the Great 
Lakes? 

Who are they? The question is being 
asked by every man on the Great Lakes. 

Union sailors and firemen will never 
do it. That much is certain. But the 
non-union seamen want this legislation as 
eagerly as do the union men. It will 
benefit all. Everybody knows that. Who 
then can the Lake Carriers get to use 
against it? Just think it over. It is very 
simple. They will need only a few, a 
very few men. The others will know 
nothing about it until the damage is 
done. 

A few sailors and a few firemen, care- 
fully selected for the job by the Lake 
Carriers, will be very quietly taken to 
Washington and brought before the Sen- 
ate Committee, there to represent all oth- 
er non-union men, whether the others like 
it or not, and to say that everything is so 
"absolutely satisfactory" on the Lakes that 
remedial legislation is not needed or 
wanted. 

Surely this ought to be a lesson to the 
non-union sailors and firemen. Will they 
continue to permit themselves to be 
handled like a lot of helpless sheep from 
among whom the Lake Carriers' Associa- 
tion can at any time and for any purpose 
select a few to act, as "bellwethers" for 
the purpose of leading all the others to 
destruction? The "W^elfare" scheme has 
begun to operate. Under its rules the 
seamen are not permitted to speak for 
themselves. So the Lake Carriers select 
the men to do the talking, and such men 
must talk for the welfare of the ship- 
owners, not for the good of the seamen. 
That's the "^^'elfa^e plan." 

Let the non-uiUMii men think tliis over. 
They are tn l)t- dclihcrateiy used against 
themselves. And they are helpless, they 
can't prevent it. .\ot as non-union men. 
acting alone. There is only one way in 



which they can protect themselves. Do 
what the union men have already done. 
Get together with their fellow workers. 
Join the Union. That is the one way 
in which they can protect their rights as 
workers and as citizens. There is no 
other way. 

V. A. Olan'der. 



PETROLEUM IN AMERICA. 



That the petroleum production of the 
United States in 1911 surpassed the record 
of 1910 by nearly 11,000,000 barrels, we 
learn from the press bulletin of the United 
States Geological Survej' ("Washington. 
July-August). The total production of the 
world also surpassed all previous records, 
amounting to over 345.000.000 barrels, and 
of this the United States produced more 
than 63 per cent. The value of this enor- 
mous output of oil in the United States 
for 1911 was $134,044,752. the average price 
being 60.8 cents a barrel. Final figures 
have been compiled by David T. Day, the 
petroleum statistician of the Geological 
Survey. It appears that — 

"The increase for the year was caused 
principally by the gain in California, which 
was by far the largest producer, its output 
being over 81,000,000 barrels. Another fac- 
tor in the increase was the discovery of oil 
at Vinton, La., and the comparatively new 
Caddo field in Louisiana also grew in im- 
portance. .A find of high-grade oil at EIcc- 
tra in northern Texas was another notable 
event of the year. 

"Oklahoma, with a production of more 
than 56.000,000 barrels, extended its field 
well into Osage and Pawnee counties, and 
oil was discovered still farther west, in 
Kay County, considerably increasing the 
Mid-Continent yield. All these gains in 
the Mid-Continent field, however, were off- 
set by the declines in Illinois and States 
farther east ; in short, all fuel oils increased 
and refinery oils declined. Another feature, 
the influence of which is being felt in 1912, 
was the increase in transporting and re- 
fining capacity, which in spite of the gen- 
eral increased yield of the country led to 
a drain on stocks in the Mid-Continent 
field, and the result has been a general in- 
crease in the price of crude oils for re- 
fining. 

"With a gain in production of nearly 
11.000.000 barrels and with an increase in 
price at the end of the year, it is evident 
that an unusual condition in the oil market 
existed. The three commodities of general 
market value to be considered in connec- 
tion with crude oils are gasoline, kerosene. 
and residuals, the last suitable for fuels in 
the W^est and for lubricants and wax in the 
East, In the trade 'naphtha' is the name 
generally applied to oils lighter than kero- 
sene as distilled from crude oil. but by the 
public the term 'gasoline' is applied to the 
light fraction of the oil suitable for inter- 
nal-combustion engines. In fact, when 
crude naphtha is redistilled it is for the 
most part separated so as to yield gaso- 
line and lighter or heavier kerosene. It is 
a matter of interest that the demand for 
ga.solene has become so imperative that 
little or none is now allowed to lower the 



safety of lamp oils; the latter have there- 
fore greatly improved in character. 

"In the production for 1911 California 
led ofi", with 81,134,391 barrels; Oklahoma 
took second place, with 56,069,637 barrels ; 
Illinois was third, with 31,317,038 barrels, 
and Louisiana was fourth, with 10.720.420 
l)arrels. The prices of the different oils 
varied greatly, ranging from 47 cents to 
$1.32 a barrel. Thus while the production 
in Pennsylvania was only 8,248.158 barrels, 
its value was $10,894,074. whereas Louis- 
iana, which produced 10,720.429 barrels, re- 
ceived for it only $5,668,814." 

The following table of total production 
shows the general increase in production 
for the United States since 1901 : 

Barrels. 

1901 69,3-89.194 

190.3 100.461,337 

1905 134,717.580 

1907 166,095,335 

1909 I&ri70,874 

1911 220,449,.391 



SPIES IN UNIONS. 



Attorney Earl Rogers, chief counsel for 
Clarence Darrow, told the jury at Los An- 
geles that when he (Rogers) was em- 
ployed by the Los Angeles Merchants' and 
Manufacturers' .Association, he had a spv 
in every union, and these men reported 
every day to him. 

While most every unionist knows that 
his local is honeycombed with spies, few 
workers know how these spies work. It 
is generally supposed they make a special 
effort to keep track of the local's proceed- 
ings, but the value of a spy is in getting 
into the confidence of officers and active 
workers. Any contemplated move is re- 
ported: so is the trend of thought, and the 
views of various men. Watching union 
meetings is the least of the spy's work. 
His value consists in dividing workers, 
creating turmoil, and making dissension 
possible. These things keep men's minds 
ofT bad conditions, long hours and low 
wages. 

Time and again these spies have been 
proven to be the noisiest men in a local, 
and have been the loudest condemners of 
employers, but it is always noted they are 
never preaching harmony. Instead, they 
are found continually standing for a "prin- 
ciple," regardless of the views of the vast 
majority. The spy has more than one sys- 
tem, and he is the best investment the 
capitalist can make as long as he keeps a 
union in an uproar. — Toledo Union Leader. 



.\n increase since last year of almost H 
per cent, in the volume of domestic Lake 
shipments is shown by the June figures 
of trade movements of the Great Lakes 
just made public by the P)ureau of statis- 
tics of the Department of Commerce and 
Labor. The freight shipments during the 
month aggregated 13,731,893 short tons, 
and during the first six months of the 
present year, 27,072,774 short tons. 



DIED. 
Peter Mooney, No. 7332, L. S. L'., a na- 
tive of Ireland, age 38, died at Chicago, 
III., on Sei)t. 20, 1912. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



DEEP-SEA DISCOVERIES. 



( )ne of the discoveries made by the 
deep-sea soundings of the Challenger ex- 
pedition, which arrived recently at Ber- 
muda from the Azores, is a mountain ridge 
that extends from Greenland to the mouth 
of the Amazon, on the coast of South 
America, and includes the whole volcanic 
region of the Azores. This ridge is no- 
where more than two miles below the 
ocean level. Toward the east it is divided 
between Europe and Africa by an im- 
mense valley from two and a half to three 
miles in depth. The valley reaches north 
of the equator as far as the fifty-second 
degree of latitude. If this valley were not 
under water it would present a view of 
whose magnificence no conception can be 
formed, for in the north it extends to the 
gigantic mountains of Cape Verde and the 
Canary Islands, the latter of which, with 
the Peak of Tenerifife, would be 26,000 
feet in height, Madeira would command, 
from a height of 26,000 feet, a view of this 
valley and another stretching toward the 
Mediterranean. On the western side of the 
ridge is a vast undulating plain, which 
extends at an average depth of two and 
three quarter miles to the American coast. 
Bermuda, which rises now only 200 feet 
above the ocean level, is in fact an isolated 
column 15,000 feet high, which would over- 
look an amphitheatre of at least 500 miles 
in radius. Between the West Indies and 
America, and in the vicinity of the Azores, 
the water is of uniform depth and warmth. 
There was not much animal life found in 
the great depths. The blind crustacea 
appear to belong to the western hemi- 
sphere; in this part these animals require 
many eyes. A sea garnel was caught 
which, singular to relate, had four eyes, 
two of which were in the front knee 
joints. 

The conditions under which life exists 
in the deep sea are very remarkable. The 
pressure exerted by the water at great 
depths is enormous, and almost beyond 
comprehension. It amounts roughly to a 
ton weight on the square-inch for every 
1000 fathoms of depth, so that at the depth 
of 2500 fathoms there is a pressure of two 
tons and a half per square inch of surface, 
which may be contrasted with the fifteen 
pounds per square-inch pressure to which 
we are accustomed at the level of the sea 
surface. An experiment made by Mr. Bu- 
chanan enabled us to realize the vastness 
of the deep-sea pressure more fully than 
any other facts. Mr. Buchanan hermetical- 
ly sealed up at both ends a thick glass tube 
full of air several inches in length. He 
wrapped this sealed tube in flannel, and 
placed it, so wrapped up, in a wide copper 
tube, which was one of those used to pro- 
tect the deep-sea thermometers when sent 
down with the sounding apparatus. The 
copper case containing the sealed glass tube 
was sent down to a depth of 2000 fathoms, 
and drawn up again. It was then found 
that the copper wall of the case was bulged 
and bent inward opposite the place -where 
the glass tube lay, just as if it had been 
crumpled inward by being violently 
squeezed. The glass tube itself, within 
its flannel wrapper, was found, when with- 
drawn, reduced to a fine powder, like snow 
almost. — Notes by a Naturalist on the 
Challenger. 



SUICIDES IN 1911. 



In 1911, for the first time, the suicide 
rate of small cities in the United States 
exceeded the rate for cities of over 250,- 
000 population. The rate in our small 
cities last year was 19.8 per hundred thou- 
sand, whereas the rate of suicide in twenty- 
one cities with 250,000 or over was 19.5 
per hundred thousand population. In sev- 
enty-nine small cities out of 100 of all 
sizes, 1395 persons killed themselves dur- 
ing 1911. 

In 100 American cities (seventy-nine un- 
der 250,000 and twenty-one over that pop- 
ulation) the rate of suicide has grown 
steadily from 12.8 per hundred thousand 
twenty years ago, to 20.3 in the five-year 
period ending with 1911. In 1910 the rate 
throughout our registration area was six- 
teen per hundred thousand, so that there 
must have been 15,000 suicides in the 
United States last year. 

These figures are taken from the tables 
of Dr. Hofifman, actuary for the Prudential 
Life Insurance Company, and are com- 
mented on in a recent issue of The Jour- 
nal of the American Medical Association. 
Comparing these figures with Prussia's 
record, Dr. Hofifman shows that the Prus- 
sian suicide rate during 1910 was twenty- 
one per 100,000, about that of American 
cities. There were thirty-two male sui- 
cides as against ten female suicides. The 
suicide mortality under 15 years is 0.68, 
rising to 16.61 between the fifteenth and 
nineteenth years, and to 26.84 between the 
ages of 20 and 24 ; during the latter period 
defective education, mental, moral and 
economic, seems responsible for the very 
high suicide frequency. But the highest 
rates are from 34.89 at 40 years to 58.71 
at the seventy-ninth year — the period when 
those given to mental depression manifest 
decadence of mind and body. 

For all ages the principal cause of sui- 
cide in Prussia was unsoundness of mind 
(22.8 per cent, of the male and 40.6 per 
cent, of the female suicides) ; next came 
bodily disease (10 per cent, males and 9.3 
per cent, females). Nervous diseases ac- 
counted for 4.3 and 7.4 per cent., respect- 
ively. Alcoholism was blamed for 10.1 per 
cent, male, and but 1.5 per cent, female sui- 
cides. Sorrow and distress accounted for 
12.2 male and 7!? per cent, female suicides. 



Honolulu Japanese have developed a 
new industry in the local fisheries now 
all but monopolized by them. They are 
buying up all the surplus aku, when big 
catches are brought into the market, which 
they manufacture into a peculiar article of 
dried fish for export to the mainland. 
They have erected a plant in the rear of 
the Fisheries Co.'s place at the market, 
v/here they clean, boil, and then sun- 
dry the fish, making an article that is 
said to keep well, besides being quite 
palatable. They also produce two by- 
products. One consists of the entrails of 
the fish compounded and cooked into some 
kind of chowder or soup that is said to be 
relished by the Japanese. The other by- 
product consists of the heads and tails, 
which are collected and sold to the fer- 
tilizer works. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases ! 



NOTICE TO SEAMEN. 



IMPORTANT. 



Any seaman who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above sta- 
ted reasons, or because of rules of the so- 
called "Welfare Plan," by any agent or 
representative of the Lake Carriers' Asso- 
ciation or any of its allied concerns, in- 
cluding the masters and officers of the 
ships. Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 
V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 

INFORMATION WANTED. ' 

Joseph Orlick, last heard of on steamer 
Santa Marie, in 1908, is inquired for by 
Carl Stocket, 71 Main street, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Ed Jordan, No. 10415, L. S. U., is inquired 
for by his sister, Mrs. Raynor, 319 Caroline 
Street South, Hamilton. Any one knowing 
his whereabouts please notify the above ad- 
dress. 



LAKE DISTRICT, I. S. U. of A. 

HEADQUARTERS; 

laAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

570 West Lake Street, Chicago, III. 
BRANCHES AND AGENCIES. 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, 21 High Street 

Telephone 552. 

TOLEDO, OHIO 54 Main Street 

Telephone Bell East 756. 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone. New, Broad 385. 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

CONNEAUT, 992 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

BRIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 
HEADQUARTERS. 
71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone Seneca 48. 

BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 445 LaSalle Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1814 Fourth Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 
HEADQUARTERS. 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 2295. 
BRANCHES. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 314 N. Clark Street 

ASHTABULA, 74 Bridge Street 

TOLEDO, 54 Main Street 

DETROIT. MICH 7 East Woodbridge Street 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 
MARINE HOSPITALS. 
CHICAGO, ILL.. DETROIT, MICH.. CLEVELAND, O. 
RELIEF STATIONS. 

Ashland, Wis. Ogdensburg, N. Y. 

Ashtabula Harbor, O. Oswego, N. Y. 

Buffalo, N. Y. Port Huron, Mich. 

Duluth, Minn. Manitowoc, Wis. 

Rscanaba, Mich. Marquette, Mich. 

Grand Haven, Mich. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Green Bay, Mich. Saginaw, Mich. 

Houghton, Mich. Sandusky, O. 

I .,dington, Mich. Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 

Manistee, Mich. Sheboygan, Wis. 

FOrle, Pa. Superior, Wis. 

Menominee, Mich. Toledo. 0, 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WHAT ABOUT THE NEGRO? 



The wildest guesses imaginable have 
been made as to the future of the negro 
race. It has been said with equal insist- 
ence, and with probably equal authority, 
both that the negro would ultimately dom- 
inate the United States because of the 
large birth-rate among negroes, and that 
the negro race would some day be prac- 
tically eliminated. But what are the facts? 
First of all, it is important to remember 
that during the last sixty years the total 
population increased four-fold, whereas 
the negro population increased only two 
and two-thirds-fold. 

While it is impossible to secure com- 
plete vital statistics in this country, there 
are certain registration areas in which fig- 
ures am kept. Unfortunately these areas 
are for the most part in the cities; there 
are almost no records in the country. In 
1890 the death rate for negroes in the reg- 
istration areas was 29.9 per thousand, 
whereas for whites it was only 19.1 per 
thousand. As these figures for the negroes 
included a few Mongolians and Indians it 
would be fair to say that the actual death 
rate was about 29 per thousand for the 
negro. This means that for every thou- 
sand negroes, 29 die annually. In the Cen- 
sus Report for 1900 the figures are as fol- 
lows: Negroes, 30.2 per thousand; whites, 
17.3 per thousand. It will be seen that 
not only is the death rate among negroes 
nearly twice as great as it is among whites, 
but that the death rate among negroes is 
increasing, whereas it is decreasing among 
whites. 

In the matter of birth-rates, all the facts 
are against the negro. Absolutely reliable 
data is not available, but taking the num- 
ber of children in the United States to 
females between the ages of fifteen to 
forty-four years of age, we arrive at the 
following conclusions: In the United 
States as a whole there were in 1880 to 
every 1000 white women 586 children ; to 
every 1000 negro women (including In- 
dians and Mongolians), 759 children. In 
1900 there were to every 1000 white 
women 508 children, and to every 1000 
negro women 585 children. While the 
birth-rate has greatly declined for both 
races in twenty years, it has declined more 
rapidly among negroes than among whites ; 
namely, 78 per thousand for whites, and 
174 per thousand for negroes. 

These figures would seem to indicate the 
continued supremacy of the white race — if 
present tendencies continue. But this fact 
continues to stare us in the face : the negro 
is actually increasing in numbers, not as 
fast relatively as is the white, but we 
may as well make up our minds that the 
negro is here to stay. It's simply a ques- 
tion as to whether he will be a "good" 
negro or a "bad" negro. And the answer 
to this question depends as much upon 
the whites as it does upon the blacks. We 
should also consider it a finality that the 
white race and the negro race will rise or 
fall together. If it is impossible to have 
a nation part free and part slave, it is still 
more impossible to have at the same time 
in one country, a morally and physically 
decaying race, and a surviving race un- 
touched by the dying race's fate. 

The fact that the negro is dying in such 
large numbers of tuberculosis and other 



still more frightful diseases is, of course, 
due to his ignorance and to other reasons 
for which he is largely responsible, but 
we cannot forget that it is also to be 
charged to the fact that he is compelled to 
live in the worst sections of our towns 
and cities, often without drainage or sewer- 
age or garbage service, without water with- 
in a reasonable distance, and scarcely any 
of the sanitary conditions in house or 
yard or street which whites consider an 
absolute necessity. We drive the worst 
forms of immorality into the negro quar- 
ters and then curse the negro because of 
his moral weakness. We subject him to 
the severest test of our city life — physical, 
moral and political — and then cynically de- 
clare that the "nigger" is no good anyway. 
Let's give him a square deal — a man's 
chance. Neither race hatred nor mawkish 
sentimentality will settle this very delicate 
question. The South cannot settle it alone, 
and the North cannot do the work for the 
South. The North and the South, the city 
and the country, must tackle the thing to- 
gether, for this is a national problem. — 
Rev. Charles Stelzle. 



SHIPBUILDING IN VENEZUELA. 



The second steel boat, Nuevo Mara, 
built in the national navy yard of Puerto 
Cabello, was launched August 25, 1912. 
The boat is built of steel, one-fourth inch 
thick, with the following dimensions : 
Length, 125 feet; width, 25 feet; depth, 
5 feet 8 inches; capacity, 150 tons; and 
draft, 4 feet. The boat was built for the 
Venezuelan Fluvial & Coastwise Naviga- 
tion Company, and will be used on the 
Lake of Maracaibo. There are 3 compart- 
ments for cargo, 16 staterooms, and all 
modern improvements, including electric 
light and running water in each stateroom. 

This is the first steel boat to be used for 
passengers and freight ever built in Vene- 
zuela, and Dr. Luis Munoz Tebar and his 
first assistant, Dr. Fernando Capriles, are 
to be congratulated upon its successful 
completion. It is also pleasing to note 
that all of the material, including the ma- 
chinery, used in the Nuevo Mara was pur- 
chased in the United States. 



Statistics compiled by the United States 
Bureau of Education show that there were 
4,856 foreigners enrolled as regular stu- 
dents in the universities and colleges of 
the United States during the school year 
1911-12. Summer students brought the 
total ui) to 5,227. These figures do not 
include the number of students in prepara- 
tory schools. Of this number, 3,983 were 
undergraduates, 249 were graduates of 
American colleges taking graduate work, 
and 624 were graduates of foreign col- 
leges engaged in graduate work here. 



As Norwegian farms are small, all the 
churning is done in homemade churns. The 
butter is then packed in small barrels and 
sent to market. The United States Vice 
Consul, General H. E. Dahr, Jr., has been 
told, however, that recently a margarin 
manufacturer at Christiania has begun to 
pack butter in ready one-fourth, one-half, 
and 1-kilo packages — practically one-half, 
1. and 2 pound packages. 



Demand the union label upon all purcha.ses' 



LABOR'S KONOmC PLATrORM. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted into 
law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of United States Gov- 
ernment Postal Savings Banks. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
or AMERICA. 

(Continued from Page 5.) 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO. Cal., 91 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, W'ash., 1408% Western Ave., P. O. Box 



875. 



PORTLAND, Ore., 101 N. Front St. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal.. 123 Fifth St., P. O. Box 574. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 
Headquarters: • 
SAN FRANCISCO. Cal.. 51 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE. Wash., 209-210 Powell Building. P. O 
Box 1335. 
SAN PEDRO. Cal., P. O. Box 54. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Pox 138. 

Branches: 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

LA CONNER, Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN, Wash.. P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGETOWN. Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR. Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER. Ore. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 

KETCHIKAN. 
LORING, Al.iska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBURG. Alaska. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO. Cal.. 93 Steuart St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE. Wash.. 84 Seneea St., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 



The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be procured by seamen at 
any of the above-mentioned places: 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASIA 

29 ERSKINE STREET. SYDNEY. N. S. W. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



will be there, and Charlotte Bronte. Tol- 
stoy, possibly Bernard Shaw, although he 
is not very human reading to the working- 
man, and assuredly H. G. Wells. In fine, 
the coal miner's little library represents 
the active constructive literature of the 
past and present, because, living the life 
he does of incessant struggle with nature, 
he wants to know — he wants to know!" 

Workmen's Law a Success. 

According to a report just sent out by 
the commissioner having in charge the 
Workmen's Compensation Bureau, the 
Washington State insurance system has 
succeeded beyond the best hopes of its 
friends and sponsors. "In this act one of 
the youngest States is giving the older 
commonwealths another example of the 
wise progressive law. The State's control 
over public utility corporations, giving tha 
suffrage to women, eight-hour laws for un- 
derground miners and women wage earn- 
ers, full-crew law for railways, and other 
laws enacted during the past four years in 
the interest of labor, deserve full praise, 
and should not be forgotten in the triumph 
of our compensation act. The compensa- 
tion law of this State has forty-seven com- 
inilsory classes or groups. All other States 
having laws of this character are elective 
or optional. From the forty-seven groups 
mentioned there has been paid into the 
accident fund $791,483.57, from which in 
ten months $503,144.68 has been taken for 
cash accident awards and reserves to guar- 
antee pensions of widows and orphans. 
The compensation act has thus ushered in 
an era of publicity regarding the appalling 
maiming, dismembering, and killing of 
workmen in the mines, mills, and work- 
shops of the State." The general feeling 
among the people of this State is that the 
compensation act is an unqualified success. 



WHAT IS XYLOLOGY? 



Cigarmakers in Session. 

The International Cigarmakers' Union 
opened its convention in Baltimore, Md., 
on September 17. This is the first con- 
vention held by the organization in six- 
teen years, and is attended by delegates 
from every part of this country and from 
Cuba and Porto Rico. Three hundred and 
ninety-nine delegates were reported by the 
committee on credentials. There is not a 
single woman delegate in the convention. 
Nearly one-fourth of the cigarmakers to- 
day, asserted President Perkins, are women, 
and although there are many women in 
the Cigarmakers' Union, yet for some rea- 
son not a single one secured election as 
delegate. It is proposed by delegates of 
this convention that a change be made in 
the pension fund. Another proposition is 
to establish a home for aged cigarmakers 
and many changes in the laws are being 
l)roposed. Samuel Gompers, president of 
the .A.merican Federation of Labor, is a 
delegate to the convention. 



Japan's chief export is silk, which for 
several years has constituted 40 per cent, 
of the export trade of the country. The 
L^nited States has been Japan's best cus- 
tomer, purchasing over one-third of the 
exports, while China is the next best buyer. 



Would you like to be a xylologist? Re- 
ports from Washington indicate that busi- 
ness along that line is likely to be booming 
in the near future. The practitioner of this 
new and important branch of science 
should be able, if he knows his business, to 
tell one kind of wood from another. This 
seems easy, but the man who thought he 
had oak trim in his house when it was 
really ash, and he in whose dwelling white- 
wood did duty for Georgia pine, will tell 
you that it is not. The facts and principles 
on which it is based are now finding ex- 
pression in forestry, agriculture, civil en- 
gineering, and in all phases of the use of 
wood products. In brief, xylology is the 
science of wood-structure, the identification 
of woods, and the detection of fraudulent 
substitutes. A writer in The Scientific 
American Supplement (New York, July 
20) tells us that it is linked with the sub- 
ject of conservation, being a natural out- 
growth of the destruction of the products 
of our forests. We read : 

"The chief cabinet and construction tim- 
bers formerly employed are now becoming 
scarce, or, in a few cases, practically ex- 
hausted. Black walnut, yellow poplar, red 
gum, black cherry, white pine, and hem- 
lock have been extensively exploited, and 
suitable substitutes are now being sought. 
"Certain other woods are now being used 
in place of them. Instead of black cherry, 
birches are being used, which are also be- 
coming scarce. Black walnut was formerly 
so highly esteemed that it was used in the 
form of veneer to cover Spanish cedar, 
which is now classed with the best cabinet 
timbers. Western white and sugar pines 
are sent to the eastern markets to supply 
the demand for our eastern white pine. 
Hemlock, which was formerly cut simply 
for the sake of its bark for making tannin 
extract, is so scarce that the tannin we use 
now must be obtained chiefly from other 
sources. 

"As a result, there are now being im- 
ported annually into the United States 
millions of tons of forest products to take 
the place of our gradually decreasing sup- 
ply. This imported material often requires 
the closest kind of inspection in order to 
avoid fraudulent substitution. This is par- 
ticularly the case with woods from which 
dye or tannin is obtained, and with ground 
wood and bark of trees having medicinal 
value, all of which must be carefully ex- 
amined and identified." 

Again, true mahogany in the West In- 
dies and Central America is growing 
scarcer every year, we are told, and wood 
users are eager to secure a substitute. 
During the last two decades twenty-five 
different kinds of woods have been sold as 
mahogany in London, Liverpool and New 
York. The purchaser of these woods is 
often under the impression that he is get- 
ting the only true mahogany, when he is 
paying for a much inferior wood. Super- 
ficial appearances often deceive; the micro- 
scope never. There has thus sprung up a 
need for men who can tell these woods 
apart. 

"The chief purpose of this work is not 
simply to detect fraudulent substitutes and 
to establish scientific testimony for prose- 
cuting those knowingly substituting in- 
ferior woods. It has a greater object in 
view, namely, ferreting out new and little 



known woods with properties and struc- 
tural characters similar or nearly similar 
to those well-known kinds which are now 
being rapidly exhausted. Superficial and 
gross characteristics can not always be re- 
lied upon in selecting a substitute for a 
certain wood with special qualifications, 
nor are tests relative to their physical 
properties always conclusive as to whether 
one kind may be substituted for another 
of well-known characteristics. The xylolo- 
gist is usually best able to tell the uses to 
which a wood may be put, the same as an 
assayer can determine the value of an ore. 
"This new work has been developed to 
cast new light upon weighty problems in 
the uses of the product of the forest. It 
is unique, and although decidedly new, it 
has already proved its value. . . . The 
aim and ultimate results of these xylologi- 
cal investigations are most vital, not only 
to those who are concerned with the study 
and teaching of plant anatomy, but also 
to all users of wood. Original research 
work along this line is not a field for the 
untrained, but a life study for men with 
ability and ambition. Though it is in its 
infancy and has accordingly made many 
mistakes, its importance is surely and 
steadily gaining the attention of lumber 
dealers and men at the head of wood-using 
industries. Necessity for such work is be- 
ing felt wherever lumber is now being 
bought or sold, and the range of its use- 
fulness is growing remarkably." 



THE ACME OF ABSURDITY. 



Unequivocal endorsement of existing 
economic conditions puts the endorser in 
a ridiculous position. To defend his po- 
sition he must stand on ridiculous as- 
sumptions and can not avoid putting forth 
ridiculous arguments. This is the explan- 
ation of President Taft's speech of ac- 
ceptance. He approaches therein, if he 
does not actually reach, the acme of ab- 
surdity. But his plight is pathetic, as well 
as ridiculous, for gross ignorance con- 
vinces him that the nonsense he solemnly 
utters is profound truth. 

His comment on the Initiative and Ref- 
erendum is an example, as follows : 

"Votes are not bread, constitutional 
amendments are not work, referendums do 
not pay rent or furnish houses, recalls do 
not furnish clothing, initiatives do not sup- 
ply employment or relieve inequalities of 
condition or of opportunity." 

He is lucky in that he is not engaged 
in any occupation where tools or machin- 
ery are needed. If he were a farmer, for 
instance, he might say : 

"Plows are not crops, threshing ma- 
chines are not wheat, barns make nothing 
grow, reaping machines create no market 
for products." After trying for a season 
to run a farm on such principles he would 
answer a query concerning the cause of 
his failure by honestly saying: "God 
knows, I don't." 



The forest lands of Chile amount to 10,- 
136,880 acres, irrigated lands to 2,712,060 
acres, and those suitable for irrigation to 
2,640,043 acres. There are 1,360,970 acres 
of farm meadows and 2,252,640 acres of 
natural grass lands. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases ! 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




SEATTLE, WASH. 



■-ri_n_nar<_r, ii ^ i _-Lrur i J-u-u-ii->- | - | - ~ i --*■■ ■■■■■■■■■■***»* ■■■» 



School Phone Ind. A 4484 



The International Cigarniakcrs' 
convention convened in Baltimore, 
Md., on Tuesday, September 17, for 
the first time in sixteen years. 

General Secretary-Treasurer Wil- 
liam Weeks, of the Brotherhood of 
Railway Carmen of America, reports 
that a new lodge has been organized J 
at Ionia, Mich., on the Pcre Mar- 
(|uette Railroad, with nearly fifty 
members on the charter list. 

The United Brotherhood of Car- 
penters opened their biennial conven- 
tion in Washington, D. C. on Mon- 
day, September 16. Auditing and 
other committees have been in 
Washington for some time com- 
pleting the work allotted to them. 

Just as he was finishing an ad- 
dress to a large gathering on Boston 
common, William D. Haywood of 
Denver, general organizer of the In- 
dustrial Workers of the World, was 
arrested on September IS on a 
capias warrant, charging him witli 
conspiracy in connection with the 
Lawrence strike of textile workers 
last winter. 

Presiding Judge Willis, of Los 
Angeles, has set the time of arraign- 
ment of Clarence Darrow on the 
charge of bribing Robert F. Bain, a 
McNamara juror, for October 21. 
The motion to quash the second in- 
dictment was denied by Judge Willis. 
The plea that all the evidence in 
the Bain case was adduced at the 
former trial, which resulted in the 
ac<iuittal of Darrow, was ignored 
by the judge. 

The Atchison, Topcka and Santa 
l-"e Railroad Company pleaded guilty 
in the Federal Court at Los Angeles 
to violating the law prohibiting the 
working of employes more than six- 
teen consecutive hours. The indict- 
ment returned against the company 
contained twenty counts, and the 
court assessed a fine of $100 on each 
count, a total of $2000. The viola- 
tions complained of occurred on the 
main line east of Barstow. 

It is reported at Sacramento, Cal., 
from sources deemed authoritative, 
that the Southern Pacific Railroad is 
having much difficulty in securing 
competent shop help to keep their 
locomotives in running order. Many 
of the strike-breakers are leaving 
for the East and many are coming 
out and making common cause with 
the strikers. The motive power on 
the Southern Pacific is in such bad 
shape that trains are universally 
late. 

Organizing work among the 
shingle weavers continues with great 
success. The fight for the union 
scale of wages is still on with the 
University Lumber and Shingle Com- 
pany and the West Side Lumber 
and Shingle Company, of Portland. 
Oregon. These companies are be- 
ing backed by the Merchants and 
Manufacturers' Association of Port- 
land. The companies, however, are 
having difficulty in securing and 
keeping strike-breakers. 

The Michigan new workmen's 
compensation law, enacted at the 
special session of the Legislature, 
went into cfTect on the first of the 
I)ast month. The new law abol- 
ishes the defense of contributory 
negligence; the defense that the in- 
jury was caused by a fellow servant; 
the defense that the injured emploj'e 
assumed the risk of his employment. 
The maximum amount of compen- 
sation for total and permanent dis- 
(ibility is fixed at $4,000, 



Residence Phone Ind. Green 185 

MARSHALL'S 
Navigation ScFnooI 



Day and Night 
REASONABLE TERMS 
204 Grand Trunk Pacific Dock 



SEATTLE 



EUREKA, CAL. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 
UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 

SEATTI>E, WASH. 



Seattle Navigation School 



Headquarters For 

Union Made Clothing 

FURNISHINGS, HATS AND SHOES 

At 

WESTERMAN & SCHERMER 

220 and 222 First Avenue, South 

SEATTLE, WASH. 




Bonney-Watson Co. 

UNDERTAKERS 
3rd and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 
Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or 
telegraph promptly attended to 
Phone, Main 13 
Independent: Elliott 254 



Open the entire year, 
and In touch with 
latest requirements. 
Candidates thoroughly 
prepared for License 
of any grade: Master, 
Mate or Pilot; Ocean, 
Coast or Inland, 



By CAPT. W. J. SMITH, 
Nautical Expert, 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical College, 
Licensed Master of Ocean steam and 
sail vessels (unlimited), and Master 
and Pilot for Inland waters. Author of 
"Self-Instructor In Navigation," Author 
of "Practical Compass Adjustment." 
Compass Adjuster. 

507 MARITIME BUILDING 
911 Western Ave., SEATTLE, Wash. 

Phones: 
School, Main 3300. Res. Queen Anne 664 



SMOKB 

The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union -made cigars. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

532 Second Street - - Eureka, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups. SarsapariUa and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers In Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



ALASKA HOTEL 

Corner Western and Seneca 

The newest 2S-cent house in town. 

New building, new furniture. 

Special attention to mariners. 

FREE BATHS 

Special Weekly Rates 

PETER ^DESMORE^PYoprieton 

Seattle, Wash., Letter Li»t. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Posiofflre. letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' TTnion Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to call 
or have their mall forwarded during that 
period, they should notify the Agent to 
hold mail until arrival. 

Alonzo, I. Lorin, A. L. 

Anderson, P. T. Lafmore. P. de 

Anderson, Hjalmar Lungquist, John 



Anderson, Fred 
Andersen, A. 
Anderson, Carl 

Anton 
Bachman, P. "W. 
Bendixon, Nick 
Berentsen, Alfred 
Blommendal, J. 
Borgen, H. O. 
Boyd. John 
Bell. Richard 
Bedat. L. 
Cnshel, A. 
Carlson, Martin 
Certy, Carl 
Christensen, Roy 
Cliristensen, H. 
Cotton, John 
Dahl, John 
Davidson, Jakob 
Dennett, John 
Dvlevik, Elnar 
Denny, J. B. 
Eckhardt, Charley 
Erikson, Axel -732 
Erikson, Edvard 
Evensen, Andrew 
Erlksen, E. 
Edwards, John 
Edson, PYank 
Erickson, J. R. 
Foss. I.,ouls 
Frost. H. 
Froderberg, R. 
Fichter, A. 
Gibbons, J. 
Ginis, G. 
Gouda, C. 
Gunderson, Olaf 
Ge.=tgivar, Aug. 
Grahn, John 
Granberg, Fred 
(Reg. Letter) 
Grunwald, A. 

Grant, Dave 

Hall, G. A. 

Holmberg, O. 

Hagberg, Gustaf 

Heynes, H. 

Hansen, Axel M. 

Holllns, Frank 

Iversen, Arthur 

Ivessen, I. 

Jacobson, Knut 

Johnson, Andrew 

Johanson, Elnar 

Johnstone, Dick 

Johnsen, Oscar 

Jensen. L. 

Jorgenson, Oluf 

Johansen, Aug. 'W 

Johansen, N. G. 

Jonsen, P. 

.Johanson, O. K. 

Karlson. Jacob 

Kaas, Otto 

Kastelton. Frank 

King, Frank 

Kasgersen, Christ 

Kneblikoft, I. 

Kylander, H. 

Larson, E. G. 

Lewis, Geo. H. 



Larsen, S. -1081 
Lee, C. A. 
Maniers, C. 
Magnusen, Lars 
Matson. Mike 
McManigal, T. E. 
Meisland, Hans 
Mikael. J. 
Moller, J. B. 
Muir, James 
Miller, I..ouis 
Marx, Thorvald 
Maltak. M. 
McKittrick, J. 
McCallich, W. 
Nilson, A. G. 
Nilson. Alfins 
Nilson. P. L. 
Norrell, Oscar 
Nilsen, K. M. 
Naro. H. 
Nelson, Adolf 
Nilson, Frank 
Nordenburg, Johan 
Oehmichen. Fred 
Olsen, M. A. 
Olsen, Nick 
Olsson, Ernst 
Oemichen, Fred 
Olsen, Claus 
Osterberg, John 
Olsen, Edvin 
Olmholt, D. T. 
Pasquln, A. 
Petterson, A. -1223 
Petterson, Hans 
Person, John 
Pederson, John 
Petterson, Richard 
Perdjuhn, W. 
Pedersen. Carl 
Powell, Gus 
Quigley, R. E. 
Rathke. R. 
Ratcliffe. L. 
Race. Martin 
Samuelson, Harold 
Sievers, John 
Suedarich, J. 
Spelman, J. 
Swenson. B. -1932 
Souig, Chas. 
Serwold. M. O. 
Steen, T. C. 
Samsing. Carl 
Steen, Jens — 
Stange, Fritz 
Thune, H. 
Tuck, W. 
Tessner, R. 
Udley. Harold 
Waurich, R. 
Williams, Jack 
Waltemaht, J. 
Wel>er, Rasmus 
Wimmer, Geo. 
Welfare. J. A. 
Zimmer, W. 

Packages. 
Borjenson, C. A. 
Miller, Louis 
Petersen, Meyer 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St. 

Seattle, Wash. 



Herman Schulze 

- CIGAR MANUFACTURER - 
Cigars at Wholesale and Retail 

439 SECOND STREET 

Corner F EUREKA. CAL. 

White Labor Only 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates 

Front Street, between C and D 

EUREKA, CAL. 



Vernon W. Buck Arthur C. McLane 

Carl G. Benson 

BUCK, BENSON & McLANE, 

Lawyers and Proctors In Admiralty 

Free .^.dvice to Seamen. 

1265 Empire Building, 

Seattle, Wash. 

Vi tala og skrifva de nordiska spraag. 



R. R. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squlre-Uatlmer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



For 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
A SQUARE MEAL 

Try 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts.. Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



AMERICAN EXCHANGE HOTEL 
Headquarters for Scandinavian* 

OLUF KARLSEN, Proprietor 

GOOD BOARD AND LODGING 

By the Day, Week or Month. Meals 25c. 

First Street, between D and E 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Telephone Main 445 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 

Ertck 



Anderson, 

B. 
Anderson, Guss. 
Anderson, Peder 
Androlio, A. 
Anderson, Otto 
Aga, John 
Abrams, George 
Balda, Alfonso 
Bergstrom, Paul 
Blomgren, M. A. 
Brodlg, W. G. 
Blakstad, Charles 
Bryant, Willie 
Britton, Samuel 
Bochmann, F. 
Cooley, Howard 
Corty, C. 
Cordia. Peter 
Colman, E. 
Christensen 

C. 
Campbell, John A, 
Dennis. Charles 
Dorft. William 
Degroot, George 
Erickson, L. 
Ewanger, Nils 
Eugene, John 
Gwat, A. H. 
Grove, Al 
Galleberg. Martin 
Glaas, Waldemar 
Glannus, Alex. 
Heinas, Charles 
Hellsten, Gus 
Homes, Salers 



Lledekrants. Fred 
Larsen. Engvald 
Lane, Charles 
Larsen. Soren 
Lemmel, Chas. 
Lerksher. Heinrich 
Martinsohn, Alec 
McMahon. Jack 
Mathisen, Harry 
Mattheu, J. 
Macrae. Alexander 
Matson. Ellis F. 
Meyer, Dick 
Morris. Frank 
Moninger. Joseph 
Neuling. Geo. A. 
Normen, John 
Norman. Ludwig 
Olsen. Andy 
Olsen, Severin 
Peter Ohlsen, Charles 
Opheini. Lars 
Orlik. Joseph 
Peterson. Aage 
Pedersen. Rasmus 
Petersen. Peter 
Perouse, Andre 
Peterson. Maruets 
Pearson. Victor 
Rasmussen. Pete 
Uautlo, Jacob 
Heiinert. Fred H. 
Richter. Hans 
Rose. I.,uis C. 
Roche. John 
Sanders, Chas. 
Samuelson. Victor 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

THE COSMOPOLITAN 

Furnislied Rooms, Club Rooms. Bll- 
liurd and Pool Tables, Reading Room 
with latest Swedish, Finn and Nor- 
wegian newspapers. 

BARBER SHOP 
125 D. St., Eureka, Cal. 

ED. SWANSON, Prop. 



HalVorsen, William Scott. James 



Hultman. A. 
Hayden. Tom 
Haawe, Norwald 
Irwin, Robert 
Jaase, Warren 
Johnson, Jack 
Johnson, George 
Johes. Harry 
Johnson, Chris 



Schmidt. Frits 
Smith. Ernest 
Schulze. Max 
SJoholm, Waldemar 
Stephen, M. 
Swensson, John B. 
Spinessen. Kurwald 
Sundberg. Karl 
Tamford, A. 



Johnsen, Halvor J. Thomson. T. 



Johnsen, Die 
Johnsen, John 
Jensen. Chris 
Johnson, Axel 
Johnson. H. 
Jensen. Robert 
Kaup. L. 
Kealer. James 
Kutsberg. Gustaf 
Larsson. John 
Lundqulst. A. 



Turner. A. 
Turner, F. 
Uadren. G. F. 
Wall, A. 
Weber. J. 
Wennir. Edward 
Wold. Statius 
Wickstrom. Gustav 
Young. Herbert 
Zornbauer, Carl 
Zunk. Bruno, 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Paul Edmund Fictsch is inquired 
for by relatives. Address, Coast 
.Seamen's Journal. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

The Danish Consulate, 815 Mills 
Bldg., San Francisco, Cal., seeks in- 
formation concerning a Danish sailor, 
Mr. Paul Christian Hansen, called 
Poul Hansen, born in Copenhagen, 
Denmark, January 28, 1870. His 
mother in Copenhagen has not heard 
from him since February, 1902, when 
he sent a letter from San Francisco 
to her. 

Carl Herman Wesstrom, alias John 
Smith, aged 64, a native of Gothland, 
Sweden, last heard from at San 
Francisco, is inquired for by F. G. 
Klintberg, Point Reyes Life Saving 
Station, Cal. 

William Fayette White, whose 
mother died recently, is inquired for 
by his brother. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please address S. A. 
White, 106 W. Salem .Ave., Roanoke, 
Va. 

Charles Olsen, No. 31, a member 
of the Sailors' Union, is urgently 
inquired for by his brother Chris- 
tian. Address Coast Seamen's Jour- 
nal. 

John Kampe, born at Memel, Ger- 
many, who paid his last dues to the 
Sailors' Union on August 26. 1905, 
at Seattle, Wash., is inquired for by 
the German Consul at San Francisco. 
California. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal, 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 
HUOTARI & CO. 

Gents' Furnishings, Boots and Shoes 

Groceries and Notions 
We sell everything, and sell at right 
prices. Union-made Goods Specialty 

You Know the Place 
320 S. F. St., near Sailors' Union Hall 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service 

Phone 691 Stand: 

At Sailors' Union Office 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING. HATS, 

SHOES, COLLAKS, SUSPENDERS, 

ODOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



ROYAL CIGAR STORE 

Headquarters for Union-made Cigars 

and Tobacco. Red Seal Cigar a 

Specialty. The Place to get 

your Sea Stock. 

Agency for Gloss Union Steam 

Laundry. OLE LUND, Prop. 

S. E. Cor. of Herron and F Sts., 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 

Abreast of Sailors' Union Hall. 



When In Aberdeen Trade at 
BEE HIVE. 
Very best union made Hickey Shirts, 
Oil Clothing, Eureka Boots, Hats, Shoes, 
Underwear, Beddings, Tobaccos, and no- 
tions for seafaring men. 

JUKKA SAHLSTEIN 

304 South F St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

Near Sailors' Union Hall 

Open Evenings. 



THE PIONEER 

Union Made Cigars and Tobacco 

a Specialty 

Wholesale and Retail 

Pool and Billiards 

412 Herron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

G. L. WILLISCRAFT, Prop. 



Headquarters for 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods 

Boots, Shoes, Hats, Etc. 

ALEXANDER'S WHITE HOUSE 

403 East Heron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

next to Burnett's Jewelry Store 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 

FRANK STHEVENi^ 

Deals excluislvely in Union-Made CIGARS, 
TOBACCO, ETC. Call at his old Red 
Stand on Water Street, Port Townsend. 
Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 
around the corner from the Union Office. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In LIVE 
STOCK, FRESH MEATS AND VEG- 
ETABLES. Shipping supplied at 
lowest rates. ;: Port Townsend, Wasli. 



Chas. A. Pragge. Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Pres. 

Port Townsend Mercantile Co. 

(Inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED 
311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: 
Bartlett Wharf, Port Townsend, Wash. 



THE RED FRONT 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, ETC. 
Union Label Goods 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer in 

Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits 

315 Water St., next to Commercial Bank 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 

When making purchases from our 
aiivertisers. always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



S.WORKERS UNION^ 



UNIOr^STAMP 

Factory 



Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 



John F. Tobin, Pres. 



Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



OLD TOWN, TACOMA, WASH. 

h7l™mallek 

2320 NORTH 30th STREET 

Notice to our Customers: This place will be known as the "Red Front." 
Seamen's Outfitters, Shoes, Rubber Boots, "Sawyer's" Oil Clothing, Flannel Shirts, 

Quilts, Blankets, Etc. 
"Boss of the Road" Overalls, 75c; Hickory Shirts, 50c; Everything Union Made. 

I will give you a square deal as I want your trade. 
Remember the "Red Front," one block north of Union Hall, Old Town. 



PORTLAND, OR. 

WM. jonM»yoM 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 

For Quick Service Call East 4441. Resi- 
dence Phone Tabor 3. I give you a Claim 
Check for your baggage at home. Give 
me your work or we both lose money. 

Office: 
41 UNION AVE. - - PORTLAND, ORE. 

P. ROSENSTEIN J. G. WOOD 

Workingmen's Store 

Impuiter.s and Ijealers in 
FINE CUSTOiVl AND READY IVIADE 

CLOTHING 

Gent's Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, Etc. 
23 N. 3d St., nr. Burnside, Portland, Ore. 
Tel. Main 821)5 ROSENSTEIN BROS. 



facoma. Wash., Letter List. 

Anderson, Edward Jansson, John -2203 

-1739 Kesber, Karl 

Anderson, Albert B. Kirwan, Milton L. 

-1568 Knappe, Adolph 

.\nderson, Max Loren, A. L. 

Bausback, Erwin Martin, Louis -1868 

Behrins, Emll Marikwardt, Carl 

Benson, Charles Munster, Fritz 

Bloom, Charles Nielsen, C. V. 

Buckland, Wm. Olsen, Martin 

Carson, James Peterson, F. 

Christensen, Albert Sovig, Martin 

Krikson, John Swanson, Ben 

Fors, Alfred Veckenstedt, W. 
Gronstrom, WilhelmWeerman, Wm. 

Grove, Albert Zornig, Arthur 
Gustafson, Axel 



Eureka, Cat., Letter List. 



Alexander, G. L. 
Anderson, Otto 
Benson, S. 
Carlson, Gust 
Christensen, O. M. 
Frykin, Gust 
Gottberg, Henry 
Grant, John 
Gulliksen, Lars C. 
Hansen, Hans 
Hansen, J. P. 
llass, H. 
Horlin, Ernest 
Ivars, Cal. 
Jacobsen, Edy 
Johnson, A. 
Johnsen, Arthur 
.Johnson, Halvord 
Jensen, Fredrik 
Lane, Dick 
Larsen, K. L. 
Langevid, Emest 



G. 



Lindblom, Ernest 
Menz, Paul 
Menneky, Fred 
Nilson, Andrew 
Nilsen, Julius 
Ogren, Harry 
Olsen, C. 
Paludan, Chas. 
Pedersen, Paul 
Pedersen, Martin 
Pettersori, Oskar 
Ramsted, A. 
Rawke, Fred O. 
Sinyard, Walter 
Thomas. Joseph W. 
Thompson, Andrew 
Thoresen, Jens 
Wacksmann, Hans 
Wilson, John 
Wallen, L. 
Zebe, Gustav 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Richard Ryan, who left the British 
steamship Candida at San Francisco 
in July last, is inquired for by the 
British Consui-General. 

heard from since, is inquired for by 
the secretary of the Marine Cooks' 
and Stewards' Association of the Pa- 
cific Coast, 51 Steuart St., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Charles Edward Latham, native of 
Auckland, N. Z., age 23, last heard 
of at Callao, September, 1911, is in- 
quired for by his brother. Address, 
Henry Thomas (No. 550), Sailors' 
Union of the Pacific, San Francisco, 
Cal. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Nik Gustof Svanberg Nelson, born 
in Roguna Jamtland, Sweden, 44 
years of age, light brown hair, blue 
eyes, dark beard, last heard of on 
Standard Oil Company's ship Mat- 
toppa, is inquired for by his sister. 
Miss Elise Svanberg, 3953 Twen- 
tieth street, San Francisco, Cal 




Thousands of Seamen 
Have Salaries Raised 

You can be safe in judging what a man 
can .do by what has been done— past 
performances— past records. In tliefiles 
at the International Correspondence 
Schools are more than 27,000 letters that 
are witnesses to the marvelous results 
accomplished by students of the Inter- 
national Correspondence Schools. A 
recent tabulation of the records of l.noo 
students shows that the average salary 
at the time of enrolment for I. C. S. 
Courses was $.54 per month, but today, 
or at the time the letters of indorsement 
were written, the salaries have increased 
to an average of $183 per month. 

There is not, in all the world, a greater 
fouDe than the I. C. S. to put new hope in 
the hearts of laboring men and teach 
them to attain success. 

The I. C. S. are ready and willing to 
help you. Are you willing to be helped? 
Then determine what you want to be and 

Mark and Mail the 
Coupon NOW 




International Correspondence Schools 

Box 898, Scranton, Pa. 

rlease explain how I ran qualify for better waifes 
anil promotion to tlio position before which 1 have 
inaikecl X. 



Master 


C.iniinercial Law 


First OfTicer 


A.lvertisini; Man 


Second Officer 


Htiokkceper 


Petty Officer 


Stenojjrajjher 


Chief Enifineer 


Electrical Ennlneer 


First Asst Eng. 


Mechanical Enc- 


Lake Captain 
Second-Class Pilot 


Civil Engineer 


Architect 


Marine Engineer 
Mechanical Dralts. 
F.nelish Branches 
Civil Ser, Kxams. 


P-cnch ^y,,^ 
<>"i"in Edison 
ftal""' J '•'"■"•■'•"="'' 



Name 

St. & No.. 
City . 



. Statf. 



Prfsent Occupation , 



The second-class protected cruiser 
.Sydney, for the Australian Navy, 
was launched at Glasgow .A.ugust 29. 

In December nine wireless sta- 
tions, covering tiie whole coast of 
Chile will be opened for the use of 
the public and navigation. 

Houlder, Weir & Boyd, of New 
V'ork, has been taken to Cramps' 
shipyard for repairs, which, it is 
estimated, will cost not less than 
$150,000. 

It is reported from London that 
the Royal Mail Steam Packet Co. is 
negotiating for the purchase of the 
Peninsular & Oriental Steam Navi- 
gation Co. 

The French battleships to be laid 
down in 1913 will have a displace- 
ment of 25,500 tons, a speed of 21.5 
knots anil a walcr-line belt 12^ 
inches in thickness. 

From the annual report of the 
Canadian Pacific Railway Co. it is 
gathered that the sum of $1,500,000 
is to be used for the acquisition of 
>teamships for tlie Pacific Coast 
service 

The German torpedoboat "G-177" 
collided with the battleship Zah- 
ringe. on September 15, and sank 
in 90 feet of water. One member 
of the crew was picked up dead 
.'ind six others are missing. 

Tenders for the execution of har- 
bor works at Porto Alegre, in order 
to enable ocean steamers to get into 
tiiat harbor without transhipment of 
cargo at Rio Grande, have been in- 
vited by the Brazilian Government. 
A record for liunkering in the 
West. Indies was recently accom- 
plished at St. Lucia, in delivering to 
the British cruiser Cornwall 900 
tons of coal in five and one-half 
hours, equal to 164 tons an hour. 
Some 4,000 tons of coal were put 
into the bunkers of the White Star 
liner Olyinpic in fourteen and one- 
fourth hours at Southampton, August 
29. This is a record coaling feat for 
the |)ort. Thirty-two gangs of men 
were employed. 

The Italian Government is elab- 
orating the proposals laid before 
rarlianieiU for the creation of new 
ii.ival ports and the strengthening 
of existing depots. It is proposed 
to devote $20,000,000 to the work 
at Ancona, Taranto, .Augusta, and 
three other ports. 

The new British warships, which 
are to be protected against air craft, 
are also to be equipped with a new 
type of guns, firing a 31-pound shell. 
These guns can be used again air 
cr.ift and against torpedoboats. They 
r.in be elevated nearly 80 degrees, 
and will have an effective height 
range of 9000 yards and a horizontal 
range of 13,000 yards. 

The success of the Selandia and 
lier sister-ship, sold to the Ham- 
burg-American line, has brought 
their builders, Messrs. Burmeister 
111(1 Wain, Copenhagen, several 
irders, and they now have orders 
for nine motor-vessels, of an ag- 
gregate tonnage of 40,000 tons gross, 
while their orders for steamers is 
■onlined to one, a screw-boat. 

The United States Government has 
imposed a fine of $5000 on the 
steamer Havana of the Ward line, 
because she left Havana recently 
after having been refused a clean 
bill of health. The Ward line will 
contest the case on the ground that 
the American Consul at Havana ex- 
ceeded his authority in refusing its 
steamship a clean bill of health. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




Tlie French death rate shows a 
remarkable decline. 

European concessionaires are ma- 
king Jerusalem one of the most mod- 
ern cities in the East. 

The murder of a railway officer on 
a train has caused a recrudescence 
of the bandit terror in France. 

A London schoolmaster has been 
imprisoned because his suffragette 
wife refused to pay her taxes. 

Lieutenant Regazzoni, while pilot- 
ing a new aeroplane at Turin, on 
September 26, fell 230 feet. He was 
crushed to death under the wreckage. 

United States marines were wound- 
ed in forcing their way to Granada, 
Nicaragua, where the inhabitants 
were found on the verge of starva- 
tion. 

The ninth international peace con- 
gress opened at Geneva, Switzerland, 
on September 23 with the ringing of 
"Liberty bell," cast some years ago 
from the metal of a cannon, swords 
and bayonets presented by various 
nations. 

A party of engineers from the 
Bethlehem Steel Company arrived 
at Hamburg recently to arrange for 
the installation of fourteen-inch guns, 
armor and projectiles on the new 
Greek armored cruiser, the hull of 
which is to be built in at the 
Vulkan shipbuilding yards at Stettin. 

The most sanguinary engagement 
of the war in Tripoli was fought on 
September 17 near Derna, a town 
on the Mediterranean coast, 140 
miles northeast of Bengazi. The 
Italians lost 61 men and 113 
wounded. The Turks and Arabs left 
more than 800 dead on the field. 
Forty-one prisoners, including an 
Arab chief, fell into the hands of 
the Italians. 

The Zeppelin dirigible balloon 
Hansa made an oversea voyage to 
Denmark and Sweden on September 
19, visiting the Danish capital and 
Malmo, a Swedish naval port. The 
voyage occupied thirteen hours, 
which included a landing at Copen- 
hagen for luncheon. The fastest 
train between Hamburg and Copen- 
hagen runs the distance in nine 
hours. 

Bearing marks which leave no 
reason for doubt, a sea chest has 
been unearthed in Sydney which 
originally belonged to Lord Nelson. 
It is believed by historians and oth- 
ers there that from the general ap- 
pearance of the chest, which bears 
signs of much sea life, it must have 
seen active service with Lord Nel- 
son on board the Victory at the 
battle of Trafalgar. 

The practical division of Persia be- 
tween Great Britain and Russia ap- 
pears almost assured as a result of 
the conference which the Russian 
Foreign Minister has had with Brit- 
ish statesmen. All the newspapers 
which are in the closest touch with 
the Foreign Office are preparing the 
public mind for it. The necessity of 
preserving order in the interests of 
trade is the principal reason ad- 
vanced. 

The newspapers of Japan are filled 
with graphic accounts, of the suicide 
of General Count Nogi and his wife, 
in testimony of their devotion to the 
departed Emperor Mutsuhito. The 
underlying note of all editorial ut- 
terances is that, although suicide 
should be condemned for a bad 
example, tlie act in the case of Gen- 
eral Nogi plainly indicated a splen- 
did adherence to the ancient tradi- 
tional spirit of the country. 



San FranctMCO Letter List. 



Letters at the San Francisco Sailors, 
Union Office are advertised for tliree 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail is advertised In 
these columns should at once notify 
P. Scharrenberg, Headquarters Sailors' 
Union, San Francisco, to forward same 
to the port of their destination. 



Aga, J. 

Albrechtsen, A. 
Alf 

Alkinson, S. 
Allen, J. M. 
Alterleabing. Dick 
Anderman, E. 
Andersen, C. L. 
Andersen, 
Andersen 



John H. 



Andersen, N. -1549 
Andersen, -1526 
Andersen, S. P. 
Anderson -1772 
Anderson, -922 
Anderson, A. 
Anderson, A. P. 
Anderson, Eric Axel 
Baardsen. G. 
Baere, H. 
Bakker. H. 
Bang, M. 
Barton, W. 
Bath. C. 
Bausback. E. 
Baxter, B. 
Beck, B. 
Beckel, B. 
Behr, Henry 
Beirsen, A. 
Bengtson, M. 
Bengtsson. John 
Benson, -1894 
Berg, J. 
Berglund, R. 
Bergman. L. J. 
Bergen, P. 
Bergman, E. 
Bergsten. R. 
Berlin, W. 
Bernard, S. 
Bernhardsen, C. 
Hernde, W. 
Beugh, L. B. 
Bianca, F. 
Birkelbach, W. 
Callan, J. 
Caplinger, O. 
Carlsen, C. 
Carlson, Chas. J. 
Carlson, G. 
Carlsson, -876 
Carlstrom, G. 
Carlstrum, J. 
Ceelan, J. 
Chaler, B. 
Christensen, A. 
Chrlstensen, L.. P. 
Pahlgren. P. 
Dahlin, G. 
Danielsen, S. 
Daragher, J. 
Daris, P. 
Darwin, Richard 
Daylor, W. J. 
Dempsey, H. 
Devany, D. 
Ecken, M. 
Eckers, R. 
Edgerton, J. 
Edlung, K. 
Edstrom, J. 
Edwards, D. 
Edwards, J. 
Bldwardsen, J. 
Ehlert. A. 
Einardt, J. 
Ek, C. 

Ekendahl, W. 
Ellingsen, B. 
Ellingsen, L 
Fabroskl. T. 
Fagerll, O. 
Farnan, N. 
Faulkner, J. E. 
Fell, Olaf 
Figved, S. 
Finck, J. 
Geggus, Ch. 
Gillholm, A. 
Gjardahl. S. 
Glase. G. 
Goodrlge, M. 
Gorgensen, A. 
Gower, J. 
Grabamer, M. 
Grangaard, L. 
Grauers, Gust. 
Gray, A. 
Gregory, P. 
Haaland, E. 
Haisather, S. 
Haktin, E. 
Hallenberg, 
TIalvasen. -1425 
TIalvorsen, A. 
Halvorsen, I. 
Halvorsen. W. 
Hannus, A. 
Hansen, Ch. Q. 
Hansen, E. 
Hansen, H. 
Hansen, H. O. 
Hansen, H. P. 
Hansen, -968 
Hansen, J. A. J. 
Hansen, J. 
Hansen, J. M. 
Hansen, J. N. 
Hansen, K. B. 
Hansen, L. P. 
Illig, Q. 
Illman, T. 
Inberg, J. E. 
Iverdtsen. S. B. 
Jacklln, Ch. 
Jacobsen, Die 
Jacobson, J. 
Janoft, A. 
Janson. Pr. 
Jennings, Q. • 
Jensen, F. 
Jensen, -442 
Jensen, -2062 
Jensen, -2110 
Jensen, H. 
Jensen, I. M. 
Jensen, J. 
Jensen, K. 
Jensen, M. 
Jensen, N. 
Jeppson. P. _ 

Jersch, W. f 

Johansen, Hans 



Anderson, Friz 
Anderson, M. 
Anderson, Oscar 
Anderson, S. 
Anderson, S. M. 
Anderson, S. P. 
Anderson, Tom 
Anderson, AV. 
Andreassen. -1477 
Andreassen, -1136 
Anis. J. 
Antonsen, M. 
Appelgren, J. 
Appelquist, Otto 
Arbricks, A. 
Armstrong. T. 
Amecke. -1649 
Aspe, W. 
Bjomstad. M. 
Blachburn, G. 
Black. J. 
Blank, G. 
Blecha, A. 
BUkshaven, S. 
Block. W. 
Blomberg, G. 
Blumel, W. 
Borgen, K. 
Borgesen, H. 
Bowers, G. 
Bradie. J. 
Bradley, A. 
Bragge, H. 
Brains, C. 
Brander, V. 
Braner, F. 
Bredenbach, A. 
Brekke. H. 
Brennar, L. 
Breslln, A. 
Briggs, J. 
Brown, -655 
Brubo, H. 
Bryde, Ch. 
Buaas, T. 
Bulb, E. 

Christophersen, F. 
Chrlstophcrsen, R. 
Classen, G. 
Clausen, J. 
Clever, H. 
Collins, F. 
Cooley. H. 
Connell, H. P. 
Conrad, H. 
Comellussun, L. 
Cornell. R. 
Cranby, J. 
Dlller, Edw. 
Dixon, J. 
Dobbs, P. W. 
Dobrlck. J. 
DockrcU, W. 
Donelly, W. 
Douglas, K. H. 
Durholt, H. 

Ellis, J. 
Eimi, A. 
Egeland, Olaf 
Engelhard, F. 
Engstram, M. R. 
Erdmann, B. J. 
Erickson, G. 
Erlksen, K. H. 
Erlkson, Emll 
Kvanger. N. 
Evans, E. 
Evensen, .T. 
Ev'ensen, !». 
Evensen, M. 
Fischer, P. 
Flemens. P. 
Foerg, W. 
Fors, A. 
Fox, R. 
Fredrlkstad 
Froise, E. 
Grondahl, -802 
Gronman, H. R. 
Gros, J. 

Groschefskle, P. 
Guddlng. A. 
Gueno. P. 
Gundersen, -899 
Gunter, M. 
Gusch, B. 
Gustafson, J. 
Gynter, J. 

Hansen, N. 
Hansen, O. 
Hanson. J. P. 
Hanssen, -1867. 
Harjes, Albert 
Harrhorson, H. 
Hartog, J. 
Haugen, L. 
Helberger, B. 
Helen, P. 
Hellsten, H. 
Henningsen, C. 
Henricksen, C. 
Henrlksen, J. 
Henrikson, H. 
Henze, A. 
Hermansson, -1622 
Hllsen. Ingvald 
Holt, I. 
House, J. 
Hutchison. S. C. 
Iversen, C. 
Iversen, R. 
Iversen, T. 
Irvin, R. 

Johansen, H .B. E. 
Johansen, G. W. 
Johansen, K. 
Johansen, Th. 
Johanson, -2186 
Johnsen, J. 
Johnsen, P. 
Johnsen, V. 
Johnson, Airik 
Johnson, E. S. 
Johnson, -2231 
Johnson, Geo C. 
.Tohnson, W. 
Johnsson, -1452 
Jonsen, -2218 
Jordan, E. 
Jorgensen, -1840 
Jorgensen, T. 



Kaas, O. 

Kahlberg. W. 

Kallas, M. 

Kallos, J. 

Kane, G. 

Karlsen, L. 

Karlsson, E. 

Karsgaard, H. 

Keiss, L. 

Keskulas, Johan 

Kielman, J. 

Kilpatrick, C. 

Klahn, Ch. 

Klarsen, A. 

Klebingat, F. 

Kleppe, T. 

Klick, A. 

Klotzke, O. 

Laakso, F. 

Laatz, O. 

Lagerberg, Pete 

r..aine. E. 

Laizkowkl, A. 

Lange, P. 

Ijapinsaio, O. 

Larsen, E. 

Larsen, H. M. 

Larsen, -1670 

Larsen, J. 

Larsen, M. 

Larsen, P. 

Larson, C. H. 

Larson, P. 

Larson, G. 

Maatson, O. 

Machado, H. 

MacCourt. J. 

Madsen, H. 

Mainers, Ch. 

Maki, I. 

Malmgren, E. 

Markinann, H. 

Markmann, H. 

Markus, B. 

Markus, M. 

Martin. H. 

Martin, O. 

Martinsen, I. 

Marthiassen. N. 

Mathiesen, L. 

Mathisen, O. H. 

Mathson, -1810 

Matslnger, W. 

Matthews, J. 

Mattsan, W. 

Matt.son, -1471 

Maurice, P. 

Mayes, J. D. 

McCormack, J. 

McFarland, J. M. 

McGahen, John 

Mclnnis, M . 

Nachtlgall. H. 

Nelson, E. 

Nelson, M. 

Nelson, W. 

Nelson, -654 

Nichols. F. 

Nickaisen, C. 

Niederacher, L. 

Nielsen, A. 

Nielsen, C. 

Nielsen, I. 

Nielsen, N. P. 

Odeen, P. 

Oelerich. H. 

Olilsen, -569 

Ohman, P. 

Olsan, W. 

Olsen, A. 

Olsen, E. 

Olsen, -502 

Olsen, J. 

Olsen. M. 

Olsen, Ole A. 

Olsen, Oscar Efralm O'Neili, J. 

Olsen, P. Opderbeck, 

Olsen, W. Orsen. A. 



Klovning, M. 
Kluver, G. 
Knoff, L. 
Knudsen, B. 
Kodden, J. 
Kohlmeister, O. 
Koloston, J. 
Konrad, F. 
Koop, F. 

Korsberg. Volmar 
Kramer, F. 
Krile, B. 
Kristiansen, C. 
Krlstoffersen, Olaf 
Krogseth, S. 
Kromer, F. 
Kvalvtk. Oscar 
Kvestad, H. 
Larson, J. 
Lathrop, J. 
Lauritson, M. 
Lerstern, J. O. 

O. 
Llegman, T. 
Lindcloff, C. 
Lindroth, B. 
LinrusI, J. 
Lowberg, A. 
Lude, T. 
Ludvigsen. -1249 
Lund. -599 
Lunde, Ole 
Lundgren. R. 
Lundquist, H. W. 
McKeowen, Th. 
McMahon, J. T. 
McPherson. R. 
Hectors, G. 
Melder, A. 
Mesak, E. 
Mestars, G. 
Meyer, Ch. 
Meyer. M. 
Micholson, J. 
Mikelson, C. 
Miller, W. 
Milos, P. 
Minter, 
Moberg, K. 
Moen, H. 
Moen, R. 
Momson, D. 

Lr.) 
Morrison, D. 
Mortensen. R. 
Mulr, W. D. 
Muller, W. 
Munk. Ch. 
Murphy, J. A. 
Murphy, Michael 
Murray, C. P. 

Nielsen, O. 
Nielsen, P. W. C. 
Nielsen. W. A. T. 
Nllsen, -520 
Nilsen, O. 
Nllsson, -784 
Nolan, G. S. 
Norherg. J. A. 
Nordlund, G. 
Norris, E. 
Norrl.s. N. 
Nurgl, Peter 
Olson, A. 
Olson, B. 
Olson, -562 
Olson, Otto 
Olssen, Harry 
Olsson, P. 
Olsson. J. 
Olsson, O. -910 
Olsson -705 
Olsson -1104 
Olsson, G. M. 



Packham, T. 
Pagel, -1216 
Pa.ioman, -2093 
Palmeiro, A. J. 
Papeijoglon, C. 
Pappe, G. 
Pearson, A. 
Pearson, J. 
Pedersen, G. 
Pedersen. M. 
Pedersen, R. 
Pedersen, -1064 
Pederson, -1392 
Pelz, G. 
Pemherton, D. 
Perkins, F. 
Peron, Edmond 
Perry, D. 
Person, Ch. 
Peters, J. 
Petersen, A. R. 
Petersen, C. 
Petersen, B. 



Petersen. -721 
Petersen, H. 
Petersen, O. 
Peterson, R. 
Peterson, F. 
Peterson. J. 
Petersen, S. 
Peterson, -1389 
Petersson, -1301 
Pettersen, -1309 
Petterson, A. 
Pettersson, E. 
Pi-ttersson, -1447 
Petrick, T. 
Phillips, Geo. 
Pletschmann, G. 
Piroise, E. 
Piterick, H. 
Pittman, A. 
Pic- .tner. A. 
Posa. T. 
Puntll -1466 
Purgold, G. 



Quezada. B. 


Quinn, Wm. 


Quigley, R. 




Rasmalen, O. 


Relnke, F. 


Rasmussen, -497 


Reinson, E. 


Rasmussen, E. 


Resvoll, F. P. 


Rasmussen, H. P. 


Riegel, W. 


Rasmussen. J. 


Riley, R. H. 


Rasmussen. O. 


Rlppe, R. 


Rausche. Emll 


Rivero. John 


Redinger. M. 


Roche, J. 


Reiche, F. 


Rosbeck, G. 


Relmer, P. 


Rudberg. Chas 


Reinhold, Ernst 


Rund, H. 


Saastedt. N. 


Scot. J. 


Sane, Th. 


- Soagnen, J. 


Sanne, R. 


Seehusen. C. 


Sandset, O. 


Seiwersson, Ch. 


Santos. J. 


Selander, A. 


Sato, B. 


Sergeys. M. L. 


Saul, F. 


Servantes, L. 


Schager, E. 


Siebert, J. 


Schalenz, Ch. 


Bievert, H. 


Schei, T. E. 


SImonsen. S. 


Schevig, B. 


Singleman. E. 


Schlachter 


Sioblom, K. 


Schluter, P. 


Sjoblum, K. 


Schmidt, G. 


Sjogren, J. 


Schmidt, W. 


Skecltuo. -2613 


Schrej, G. W. 


Skoglund, H. 


Schroder, H. 


Smith. J. V. 


Schultz, F. 


Sningle. W. 


Schulz, R. 


Son n'jn berg. J. 


Schulze, M. 


Soderlund. A. 


Schutty, J. P. 


Sorger, E. 



Speckmann, M. 
Speller, H. 
Spetteland, B. 
Strand, Ch. 
Stangeland, P. 
Stein, -2099 
Stenberg, G. 
Stenlund, J. 
Sting, Ch. 
Storm. Th. 
Stendhahn, F. 
Tarbjorensen. A. 
Thien, E. 
Thlrup. K. 
Thomas, H. 
Tiiomel, E. 
Thompsen, E. 
Thompson, A. 
Thompson. St. 
Thomsen, T. 
Tliomson, A. 
Thorein, J. 
Thoresen, J. 

ITdekuU, Ch. 
Valbu, H. 
Valles, A. 
Walters. Albert B. 
Walman, E. 
Wambark, G. 
Wehre, J. 
Wehrtens, H. 
Weldt. H. P. 
Welsen, J. 
Wergaard, J. 
Werner, Ch. 
West. H. 
Youngberg, H. 

Zechel, W. 
Zornquesl, O. 

PACKAGES. 

Apply to Secretary of Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific. 

Apple, A. Jorgensen. Oluv 

B.Uda, A. Kallberg, C. 

Begovich, J. Marten, H. 

Berlin, W. Melder, -2085 

Blirliavn, S. Mersman. A. 

Block, Wm. Niederacher, Ludur 

Burgquist, G. A. Olsson, Carl 

Christoffersen, Olof Pedersen, J. -1138 



Strasdin, H. 
Sund, A. 
Sundberg, C. 
Sundberg, R. 
Svensen, A. 
Svenssen. J. 
Svenston, H. 
Svensson, -1995 
Svensson, -1295 
Syvertsen, H. 

Thorsell, Ch. 
Thorssell, F. N. 
Thorsen, J. 
Tronsen. J. M. 
Todal. M. 
Toegersen, -798 
Tollefsen, A. 
Torkildsen, M. 
Tornkvist. M. 
Town-send, R. 
Tuppitz, E. 

una, Ch. 
Vattli, J. 
Vllhelmson, S. 
Westman, A. 
Wiberg, J. E. 
Wickstrom 
Wilitol, E. 
Williamson. W. 
Willmann, W. 
Wlntlier. Hans 
Wliite, G. 
Wolttr, H. 
Work, J. 

Zunk. B. 



Evensen. M. 
Hall, G. A. 
Halversen. H. 
Hansen, Karl 
Hartmere -1245 
Jenkins, Fred 
Jensen. -2110 



Prieberg. P. 
Funis, T. 
Rasmussen, E. 
Sullivan. John 
Sundhahnn, F. 
Thoresen, J. 
Tupplts. 



Johansson, C. -9094 Walters, A. 
Jotmson, J. N., -2161Waltti. H. 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Alexander, A. E. 
Andorsson, Ernest 
Anderson, Axel 
Andre. Fred 
Antonsen, John 
Anderson -1420 
Aulto -1780 
Bakker, Haakon 
Brancler, Wm. 
Coldwell, J. 
Clausen, Fred 
Cristiansen, O. M. 
1 ireger, John 
Dic;-kenson. Richard 
Elenius, Axel 
Ellergaard, M. 
Gewold. M. O. 
Graf, Otto 
Hansen, Jack 
Holm, Hans 
Hakonssen, C. 
Hanssen, H. 
Herman, Axel 
Iverdtsen, S. B. 
Ingebrethsen, John 

A. 
Johannessen, J. H. 
Jenson, J. F. 
Janes, Harvey 
Johnsen, Karl 
Jensen, George 
Jacobsen, -1486 
Johannson, -2077 
Johansson, C. R. 
Jorgensen, Peder 
Johansson, C. A. 
Knudsen, B. 
Kaltas, August 
Lindholm, C. 
Ijoining, Herman 
Lanistsen, George 



Lundgren, K. p. 
Louis, B. J. 
Larsen. Johan 
Lindroos, A. W. 
MacManus, Hugh 
MacPherson, Robert 
Martin, John B. 
Mattson, K. A. 
Oksanen, Juko 
Olsson, Fred 
Pentz, Otto 
Pedersen -1054 
Pearson, Cliarles 
Petersen, Christian 
Robertson, A. 
Rudt 

Rosenfeld, Paul 
Rasehlun, Franz 
Sundman, Emll 
Siren, Frans 
Strom, -2340 
Siven, Wiktor 
Schneider, H. 
Sandby, James 
Schevig, A. B. 
Strasdin, H. 
Tollefsen, Andreas 
Tvede, Jens 
Vejada, -190 
Weber, Walter 
Wilson. P. S. 

PACKAGES. 
Anderson -1283 
Giaft. Otto 
Hansen. John 
Julius, P. 
Lehtinen. Kaarlo 
Otto -1780 
Pedersen. Peder 
Polison. Tom 
Uggla, Fred. 



MARINE COOKS' LETTER LIST 

Seattle, Wash. 

Adams, H. Kenealy, E. 

Andraca, Alf. King. R. G. 

Baker, J. Mills, Geo. 

Bailey, Wm. Meyer, Julius 

Barboner, G. N. Mongan, H. E. 

Barker. A. E. McMuUen. T. J. 

Bridges. No©l Nielsen. Peter S. 

Cahlll, John Pestell, Stanley 

Champion, Eric Piers, Claude 

Claer. Harry Redfern, R. 

De Bruin, Tac RoUan, M. 

Earl, A. Smlthers. J. 

'Cngstrom, Swan Smith, Marcus 

Flones, Fortunda Snleder, G. J. 

Gandy, Jaa. Stacy, Frank 

Gray. R. Thayer, Chas. 

Hardy. Jack Third, B. 

Howard. Jaa. TInoco. Joe 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Bernard A. Lindholm, No. 891. a 
member of the Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific, is inquired for by his mother. 

Fred (Albin) Swanson, a native of 
Malmo, Sweden, aged about 25, is 
inquired for. Address, Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 



THE HARBOR HOTEL 

Formerly "The Mohawk" 

132 EAST STREET 

Opposite Ferry 

STEAM HEAT, HOT AND COLD 

WATER IN EVERY ROOM 



Elevator Service Free Baths 

and a Large Reading Room 

Rates: 

$2.00 PER WEEK AND UP 

50c PER DAY AND UP 

T. L. SELCHATI P. N. NANSEN 

Proprietors 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY -AT- LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 

(THE GERMAN BANK) 

Savings Incorporated 1868 Commercial 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

(Member of the Associated Savings 

Banks of San Francisco.) 
The following Branches for Receipt 
and Payment of Deposits only: 

MISSION BRANCH, 2572 Mission St., 
between 21st and 22nd. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, 601 
Clement St., corner 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, 1456 
Haight St., near Masonic Ave. 

June 29th, 1912: 

Assets $51,140,101.75 

Capital actually paid up in 

Cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent 

Funds 1,656,403.80 

Employees' Pension Fund 140,109.60 

Number of Depositors 56,609 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock A. M. to 3 
o'clock P. M., except Saturdays to 12 
o'clock M. and Saturday evenings from 
6:30 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. M., 
for receipt of deposits only. 



DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
$2 to $2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bells and Hot and Cold Water in 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager. 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front St. and Broadway, op- 
posite Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier 
400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c 
per night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 
month. Baths, Reading Room. Office 
open all night. Best place near 
waterfront. Investigate. 



UNITED STATES WATCH CLUB 

FINE WATCH REPAIRING 



E. P. COLLINS. Manager 



10 EAST STREET S. W. Corner Market 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Kelleher & Browne 

THE IRISH TAILORS 

716 MARKET— Opposite Third— 33 GEARY 

NEW FALL SUITINGS 

ALL SUITS ARE MADE IN OUR OWN 
SHOP BY SKILLED UNION TAILORS. 




They are paid by the week. 
No piece work. 
SUITS TO ORDER FROM $30.00 TO $50.00 

C. BREINING, Marine Representative 



JORTALL BROS. EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 
206 EAST ST., San Francuco 

Phone Douglaa 5348 

INFORMATION WANTED. 



HOTEL SANTA FE 

684 FOLSOM STREET 
Near Third Street 
100 all sunny furnished rooms. Elec- 
tric light, hot and cold water. Rates, 
25c to 75c per day, 551-50 to $3.00 per 
week. Baths. Phone Home J 4230. Open 
all night._ ^^ _^ 

Phone Kearny 2503 

HOTEL COLCHESTER 

259 East St., Cor. of Jackson i 
Rates: 30c per Day up, $1.75 per 
Week up. 

Hot and Cold Water in Every Room. 
Free Baths and Showers. 

PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 
We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 
Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Union Label Paper and Envelopes 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

Union-made Shoes 

HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING 

GOODS, ETC. 
Fair Prices. Reliable Goods. 

50 East St., and 4 Mission St., 
San Francisco 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



FurnitureMovingbyMotorcar 

San Francisco and 
Suburban Towns 



FORSMANN & HUSEBY 
55 Market St. Phone Douglas 4400 

Anchor House 

S. PETERSON. Prop. 

FURNISHED ROOMS 

Reading Room. Electric Lights. 

495 THIRD ST. San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5390 



C. Hansen, G. Olsen, J. Johnson 
and J. Nolan are requested to call 
at the P. C. S. S. Co.'s office for 
money due for clothing lost in steam- 
er Queen. 

William Moran, who left Buffalo 
forty-two years ago, at the age of 
12 years, is inquired for by his 
sister. Address Mrs. Catherine Mo- 
ran Fossett, 421 Normal avenue, Buf- 
falo, N. Y. 

Charles Harold Allen, who has 
served as an apprentice in a British 
ship, age about 21 years, medium 
height, brown hair, last heard of in 
San Francisco November 9, 1911, is 
anxiously inquired for by his father. 
Please notify British Consul-General 
at San Francisco. 

Nils Nielsen, No. 204, a native of 
Norway, born 1862, on the Pacific 
Coast since 1892, was last in the S. 
S. Wilhelmina. Inquired for by Mrs. 
Lina Svensen, 852 Treat Ave., San 
Francisco. 

Will John O'Brien, Walter Sin- 
yard. J. Halvossen, Fred Weber or 
W. Hansen, who were on the 
schooner "Albert Meyer" last Janu- 
ary when W. Blodsing got hurt 
leaving Santa Rosalia, please commu- 
nicate with F. R. Wall, attorney for 
Blodsing, at 324 Merchants' Ex- 
change, San Francisco. 

W. Kahlberg, No. 688, and C. Mon- 
sen. No. 1964, are inquired for at 
the Standard Oil Company's office, 
at San Francisco. 

Nils Johnson, who was wrecked 
in the American bark Oasis, Sept. 2, 
1887, is inquired for by W. F. Ho- 
henschild, Berkeley, Cal. 

Duncan Carmichael, a native of 
Glasgow, last heard of in San Fran- 
cisco about three years ago, is 
anxiously inquired for by his father. 
Address, Seamen's Institute, San 
Francisco. 

Fred Victor Ford, a native of Eng- 
land, aged 35, of medium height, is 
very anxiously inquired for by his 
mother and little daughter. Please 
notify British Consul General at San 
Francisco. 

Albert Smith, a native of Cork, Ire- 
land, who left the American ship 
John C. Meyer, on Feb. 20, 1911, 
is very anxiously inquired for by 
his wife. Please notify British Con- 
sul General at San Francisco. 



C. J. SWANSON 

CLASSY CLOTHIER 

HATTER AND FURNISHER 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

UNIFORMS 

Gold Braids and Gold Wreaths of 
All Descriptions 

119 EAST STREET 

Between Merchant and Washington 

SAN FRANCISCO - CALIFORNIA 

Phone Douglas 1082 
Home Phone C-3486 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., NANUrACTURERS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Douglas 1660 




Honolulu Letter List 



Amundsen, Albert 
Albrecht, Clarence 
Bredsen, John 
Berthold, Willy 
Christensen, Theo- 

dor 
Douglas, Sam 
Darlin, Harry 
Dahlln, H. 
Ekstrom, Geo. 
Fredrlksen, Rudolf 
Greenace, Charles 
Hahn, John H. 
Hansen, L. 
Holm, H. John 



Langer, Robert 
Lundqulst, Alex. 
Matheson, Louis 
Munze, Dick 
McPherson, Louis 
Morgan, Hugh 
Nystrom, R. 
Norrls, Ned 
Roos, B. 

Rosbeck, Gustav 
SImonsen, Fred 
Saunders, Wm. J. 
Slevert, Hermann 
Swanson. Martin 
Smith, John 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Will August Eklund, Fred Weber, 
G. W. Schrej, or any other seaman 
who was on the Albert Meyer at the 
time W. Bladsing was hurt leaving 
Santa Rosalia last January, please 
communicate with F. R. Wall, 324 
Merchants' Exchange. 

W. A. Goodrich, who left the Brit- 
ish ship Puritan at San Francisco, 
February 6, 1911, is inquired for by 
the British Consul-Gener:,; at San 
Francisco. 



Home News. 



It was officially announced at 
Washington that the Panama Canal 
will be opened to traffic next fall. 

Five naval recruits lost their lives 
at Chicago, by the upsetting of a 
sailboat containing twenty-three boys 
and two petty officers. 

Finishing the longest trip ever 
made by a commercial vehicle for 
the purpose of delivering a load of 
merchandise an auto truck arrived in 
San Francisco from Philadelphia. 

During August a total of 154,346 
bales of cotton were shipped from 
Galveston to foreign countries. The 
previous record was established in 
August, 1911, when exports amounted 
to 152,657 bales. 

A quarantine against practically all 
fruit and many vegetables from 
Hawaii, on account of the Mediter- 
raneah fruit fly, was proclaimed by 
the Department of Agriculture ef- 
fective immediately. 

Indications of bubonic plague have 
l)een discovered in the Hawaiian Is- 
lands. The capture of one plague- 
infected rat on the island of Hawaii, 
250 miles from Honolulu, and one 
suspicious death have been reported 
to the public health service. 

A new sixty-hour train between 
Chicago and San Francisco on the 
lines of the Union Pacific will be put 
into operation on September 30th, 
according to present plans. This is 
ten hours faster than any train now 
running between Chicago and the 
Western Coast. 

More hard coal was received in 
Boston by sea and rail during Au- 
gust than in any month in several 
years. The tonnage receipts of the 
month are 187,984 tons. This sur- 
passes August, 1911, by 30,000 tons, 
when 157,927 tons were received. Of 
the receipts last month 13,190 tons 
arrived by rail; 174,794 tons of do- 
mestic coal and 148,845 tons of 
foreign coal were received by sea. 

The board appointed by Postmas- 
ter-General Hitchcock is now at 
work arranging a plan for putting 
the parcels post into operation on 
January 1. One of the particular 
questions with which it has to deal 
pertains to that portion of the law 
that permits farm products to be car- 
ried through the mails. It is the 
understanding at the Postoffice De- 
partment that the board will con- 
strue this provision so as to enable 
live stock to be sent by parcels post. 

The Department of Agriculture 
made public the results of an exhaust- 
ive investigation of lightning strokes 
throughout the country. The report 
disposes of the belief of ancient 
philosophers that certain kinds of 
trees, the laurel, aspen and beech, 
were never struck by lightning, with 
the statement that "any kind of tree 
is likely to be struck." The report 
shows that lightning strikes in the 
Colorado plateau region more often 
than anywhere else in the country. 

The debt of the United States 
Government on which interest has 
ceased and the greater part of which 
probably never will be collected from 
Uncle Sam, amounts to $1,700,450, 
covering loans all the way from 
1790 to 1907. Treasury oflicials are 
unable to explain the attitude of the 
holders of these bonds, except on 
the ground that they know their 
principal is safe in the Federal 
Treasury. It is estimated that nearly 
$1,000,000 of this debt has been lost 
or destroyed. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 



Cutting Critic. — Tlu- Tiusi)ian- 
Did you call me a liani actor? 

The Critic — Xo, indeed: liam ; 
worth too much. 



Cruelty. — "These are tlie chiltlren 
of my brain," said the man with the 
hunch of poems. 

"Some children," replied the edi- 
tor, "ought to be in the reform 
.school."— Washington Star. 



The Only One. — Gibbs — I hear that 
Rronson is very happy as an after- 
dinner speaker. 

Dibbs — Possibly, but that's more 
than can be said for his audience.- — • 
Roston Transcript. 



In the Old Days. — "You got your 
start in politics by burning midnight 
oil?" 

"Yes," rejilied Senator Sorghum. 
'I was one of the busiest boys you 
ever saw in a torchlight procession." 
— Washington Star. 



Alike.— Costigan — Don't say you 
"ain't done nothin'." 

Madigan — An' why not? 

Costigan — Because that isn't good 
English. 

Madigan- Faith, I'm glad to hear 
it; for, by the powers, nayther am I. 
— Catholic Standard. 



Rather Late. — The pretty trained 
nurse bent over her patient, a young 
man who was beginning to get bet- 
ter. 

".Shall I turn your head, sir?" she 
as'ed. in her low, kind voice. 

"Xo. thank you, Miss .\ngel," re- 
plied tile convalescent. "You have 
turned it already." — Youth's Com- 
panion. 



Couldn't Deny It. — "You're a two- 
faced man!" exclaimed the disap- 
pointed office seeker. "I'm not afraid 
to tell you so!" 

"Two faced?" smiled the eminent 
statesman; "my dear friend, I am 
worse than that. The papers have 
printed fifty difTerent portraits of me, 
and no two of them look alike." — 
Chicago Tribune. 



An Invitation 

We Invite deposits from every one — 
rich, poor, old and young. We recog- 
nize no classes, but treat large and 
small depositors with the same cour- 
tesy and consideration. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 



783 MARKET STREET, near Fourth 
San Francisco 



Bagley's Navy 
Plug 

A FINE CHEW 
Give It a Triatl 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 
Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 
House, San Francisco, Cal. 
THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
Is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equip- 
ped with all modern appliances to Illustrate 
and teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation in the 
p.-ist have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always in view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and is now. In addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There Is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how ignorant the seaman may be, even In the rudiments of 
common education. Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of Ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and In a 
comparatively short Interval of time. WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY 





Agent U. S. Government Charts and Nau- 
tical Publications, Hydrographic and Geodetic 

H. J. H. LORENZEN 

12 MARKET STREET 

Corner of Sacramento and Market Streets 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Dealer in 

Watches Chronometers Clocks 

Solid Gold Goods Diamonds 



MARINE & FIELD GLASSES 

NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 

EXPERT REPAIRING 

Watches, Chronometers and Jewelry 

Rates Determined by Transit Observations 

Clirononieters and Sextants Rented 



J. COHEN &. CO. 



Baltimore ClotKing Co. 

72 EAST STREET, S. F., Next to SAILORS' UNION HALL 

Have Your Suit and Overcoat Made by Them. WHY? 
UNION LABEL IN COAT, VEST AND PANTS 

OUR CUSTOMERS ARE UNION MEN. WE SELL UNION MADE 

GOODS ONLY. 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 



When Drinking Beer 
See tliat tliis Label is 
on the Keg or Bottle 



iJnion ^^?k T^le 

MADE ^^^^^ AND 

5^^r I ^^^J Porter 

^SS^ Of America rOxT 

COPYRIGHT STRADE MARK REGISTERED 1903 



(S^ 



Eyes Examined Free 



UIVIOIV 





£^ 



Repairing Our Specialty 



Jamts 3i. Sorensen 
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FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXVI, No. 4. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1912. 



Whole No. 2194. 



LIBERTY ON LAND AND SEA. 



The Hon. Halvor Steenerson, of Minnesota, 
on July 22, 1912, when the Seamen's bill was 
discussed in the House of Representatives, de- 
livered the following able address: 

Mr. Speaker: The title of this bill is: 
"A bill to abolish the involuntary servitude 
imposed upon the seamen in the merchant ma- 
rine of the United States while in foreign ports 
and the involuntary servitude imposed upon the 
seamen of the merchant marine of foreign coun- 
tries while in ports of the United States, to pre- 
vent unskilled manning of American vessels, to 
encourage the training of boys in the American 
merchant marine, for the further protection of 
life at sea, and to amend the laws relative to 
seamen." 

Now, ordinarily there can be no dispute about 
the desirability of the object expressed in the 
title. I have examined the majority report and 
the minority report on this bill, and it seems to 
me that the minority are manifestly wrong, and 
I can not follow such leadership. The facts are 
that the imprisonment of sailors for deserting 
their vessels has long since been abolished in 
the merchant marine of the United States, so far 
as the coastwise trade is concerned and so far 
as the ports on this continent north of the 
Caribbean Sea. So that an American seaman — 
that is to say, a seaman on an American ves- 
sel — can not and has not been since 1898 law- 
fully arrested or imprisoned and put in irons for 
deserting his vessel at any port on this continent 
north of the Caribbean Sea. And I find that 
the Commissioner of Navigation in the Depart- 
ment of Commerce and Labor has repeatedly 
recommended the abolition of imprisonment for 
desertion upon all merchant vessels of the Uni- 
ted States, whether engaged in the domestic or 
the foreign trade. I will insert extracts of these 
reports in the Record. 

He prints tables showing that the number of 
desertions is so infinitesimal as the small frac- 
tion of 1 per cent, of all the thousands who 
are engaged both in the domestic and foreign 
trade. So it is not a matter of very great 
commercial importance. It would not affect 
the trade at all appreciably. But even if it did, 
it should not deter us from extending the prin- 
ciples of liberty even to the laborers upon the 
sea. 

The question of abolishing imprisonment for 
desertion in the foreign vessels entering our 
ports takes on a little different form. Under 
the laws of the United States and treaties with 
foreign nations our courts and our officers, upon 
complaint of any foreign consul or representa- 
tive of a foreign country that a sailor has de- 
serted a foreign ship in our ports, are compelled 
to apprehend that sailor and imprison him and 
surrender him to the master of a foreign vessel 
in our ports, even though the ground of the 
complaint is simply that the sailor deserted the 
vessel and ceased working out his term of en- 
listment or employment. 

It is stated here in this minority report that 
this bill is chiefly for the benefit of foreigners. 
I think that is a very narrow view. Broadly 
speaking, if this bill makes it more expensive 
for the ships of a foreign flag to operate, if by 
reason of abolishing arrests for desertion the 
sailors that come here will desert, and the for- 
eign ships will have to employ sailors at a 



higher wage, or if this law shall succeed in re- 
quiring the foreign vessels to feed their crews 
better and provide more accommodations and 
more space, and require them to give their sail- 
ors shorter hours, necessarily it will increase the 
expense of operation of foreign vessels. But 
we are not legislating to help foreign vessel- 
owners. 

If we could by these means increase the ex- 
pense of our competitors, necessarily we would 
better the conditions of our own sailors as 
well as of theirs, so that it is not logical to 
say that this is exclusively for the benefit of 
foreigners. It is, no doubt, legislation that will 
result in increased expense to the foreign ship- 
owners, and that is what is desired by our ves- 
selowners, in order that they may compete with 
them on more even terms. 

There are two ways in which you can suc- 
cessfully compete with any competitor — either 
reduce your expenses to his level or compel him 
to raise his expenses to your level. This bill 
has the tendency to do this, and by means of 
this provision, together with another provision 
mentioned in the report, giving Americans the 
right to purchase vessels abroad to be used in 
the foreign trade, of which we have practically 
none now, it would seem as though our people 
would be placed on a plane approaching an 
equality with foreign competitors. 

But there are humanitarian reasons why this 
legislation should be enacted. It is not true 
that we are simply concerned in the matter of 
making money. There is a great principle at 
stake here. These sailors in foreign countries 
sign shipping articles sometimes for three years 
upon tramp vessels that come to our ports, and 
notably to the ports on the Pacific Coast, and 
engaged in the trade between South America and 
the United States — for instance, between San 
Francisco and Portland and the ports of South 
.'America on the west coast in the coffee trade — 
and receive only one-half the wages paid in the 
same trade in our American ships. And if these 
sailors desert they are arrested and imprisoned 
and surrendered to the masters of those vessels. 

In that way we are in effect performing the 
function of slave catchers. We are enforcing a 
fugitive-slave law against these foreign sailors 
who escape from their vessels, and we return 
them to that servitude; and we do this to reduce 
the expense of our competitor at sea. It is in- 
voluntary servitude, more in violation of the 
principles of which we are so proud, than the 
peonage cases that are being prosecuted in 
some of the States with so much vigor. There 
is a greater injustice in some of these arrests 
of sailors for the mere fact of quitting their 
employment contrary to the shipping articles 
than in any peonage case that has come to my 
notice. 

The argument that to repeal this law and 
abrogate these treaties would be interfering with 
the rights of foreign shipowners seems to me 
unsound and not founded in reason. It is not 
only our people that are free, but our soil is 
free — and whoever touches our shores becomes 
free. Let us remember that this was recognized 
even in the Dred Scott case. Dred Scott 
brou.ght his action in Missouri and claimed the 
right of liberty because his master had taken 
him to the Territory of Minnesota — to Fort 
Snelling — and there kept him for several years. 



and he invoked the doctrine laid down by Lord 
Mansfield in the Somerset case, to wit, that 
"whenever a human being in slavery touches his 
foot on British soil he becomes a free man for- 
ever." [Applause.] But the Supreme Court, in 
deciding the Dred Scott case, distinguished it 
from the Somerset case, because they said the 
action was brought in the State of Missouri, 
where slavery was lawful, and that therefore 
the plaintiff must fail, notwithstanding the fact 
that he had once been in free territory. The 
court, however, was careful not to overrule the 
doctrine of the Somerset case, and had Scott's 
action been brought in a free State, according 
to the logic of the opinion, the decision would 
have been the other way. It will thus be seen 
that even this much-denounced decision recog- 
nizes the doctrine of free soil. 

Somerset was a negro slave brought from 
Virginia to England in 1770 by a Mr. Steuart, 
the owner, and after two years' service he es- 
caped and was forcibly seized by -Steuart's or- 
ders and placed on board a ship lying in the 
Thames bound for Jamaica, where it was pro- 
posed to sell him into slavery. The friends of 
the negro sued out a writ of habeas corpus 
against the master of the vessel, and the Court 
of King's Bench, Lord Mansfield presiding, lib- 
erated him in 1772. 

But this doctrine against involuntary servitude 
is much older even than the Somerset case. In 
the brief in the Dred Scott case there are de- 
cisions cited as old as the eleventh century, 
and they also refer to the ordinance of William 
the Conqueror, that a residence of any of the 
servile population of England for a year and a 
day without being claimed, in any city, burg, 
walled town, or castle of the King, should en- 
title them to perpetual liberty, as an early in- 
stance of this doctrine. 

Laws in diminution of the power of a man to 
reclaim an escaped bondman in Europe com- 
menced with the laws in favor of privileged com- 
munes or towns. The earliest publicist who has 
discussed this subject is Bodin, a jurist of the 
sixteenth century, whose work was quoted in 
the early discussions of the courts in France and 
England on this subject. He says: 

"In France, although there be some remem- 
brance of old servitude, yet it is not lawful here 
to make a slave or to buy anyone of others, 
insomuch as the slaves of strangers, as soon as 
they set their foot within France, become frank 
and free, as was determined by an old decree 
of the court of Paris against an ambassador of 
.Spain who had brought a slave with him into 
France." 

He states another case which arose in the 
city of Toulouse, of a Genoese merchant who 
had carried a slave into that city on his voyage 
from Spain; and when the matter was brought 
before the magistrates the — 

"procurer of the city, out of the records, showed 
certain ancient privileges given unto them of 
Toulouse, wherein it was granted that slaves, as 
soon as they should come into Toulouse, should 
be free." 

If the minority of the Committee on Merchant 
Marine and Fisheries, and especially the gentle- 
man from Massachusetts [Mr. Greene] and the 
gentleman from Washington [Mr. Humphrey], 
who have not only signed this minority report, 
hut have spoken against this bill, really believe 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



in the principles upon which the Republican 
Party is founded, the principles of human liberty 
everywhere, why should they draw this narrow 
distinction and oppose this bill because besides 
liberating our own sailors it would liberate for- 
eign sailors also? 

The platforms recently adopted both by the 
Republican and Democratic national conventions 
favor the principles of this bill. It is not and 
should not be considered as a partisan measure. 

Why not all join the army of liberation, de- 
mand the abrogation of all treaties for the re- 
capture of fugitive seamen, the repeal of these 
peonage laws, and proclaim liberty not only 
throughout the land but throughout the seas 
also? Let the American Nation demand this 
and working conditions on the sea will improve, 
and the merchant marine will attract the bravest 
and the best to the adventurous and romantic 
■'life upon the ocean wave" and will restore it- 
self to its ancient greatness. 

Do this, and the world will say, when it sees 
our glorious flag proudly floating in the breeze. 
"There is the flag that means freedom on land 
and sea. Hail to the emblem of universal lib- 
erty!" 

I was too young to take part in the Civil War, 
but it has been a source of pride and satisfac- 
tion to me to recall the fact that my father 
shouldered his gun and fought in that war for 
the cause of freedom; and if the dead take an 
interest in the affairs of the living. I believe he 
is now urging me on in the fight for liberty in 
order that our flag upon the sea may float over 
free men instead of over the enslaved and de- 
graded. Let it become the real emblem of uni- 
versal liberty everywhere! [Applause.] 

Memorial. 
The seamen of the United States of .'\merica, 
through their committee, duly appointed at their 
national meeting, held at New York City in the 
month of November. 1909, respectfully petition 
for the pas.sage of Senate bill 6155, Hou.se bill 
11193, being substantiallv identical bills. 

.And in support of said petition your petition- 
ers respectfully represent and state as follows: 
To the Senate and House of Representatives of 
the United States, to humanitarians, demo- 
crats. Christians, and friends of human free- 
dom everywhere: 
Do we, the seamen, the yet remaining bontl- 
men, humbly yet earnestly submit this our peti- 
tion, that we be made free men and that the 
blighting disgrace of bondage be removed from 
our labor, which once was considered honor- 
able, which is yet needed in the world of com- 
merce, and which has been held to be of great 
importance to nations with seacoasts to defend. 

Existing maritime law makes of us, excepting 
in the domestic trade of the United States, the 
property of the vessel on which we sail. We 
can not work as seamen without signing a con- 
tract which brings us under this law. This 
contract is fixed by law or authorized by gov- 
ernments. We have nothing to do with its 
terms. We either sign it and sail, or we sign 
it not and remain landsmen. 

Wiien signing this contract, we surrender our 
working power to the will of another man at all 
times while the contract runs. We may not, 
on pain of penal punishment, fail to join the ves- 
sel. We may not leave the vessel, though she 
is in perfect safety. We may not, without our 
master's permission, go to a mother's sick bed 
or funeral, or attend to any other duties of a 
son, a brother, a Christian, or a citizen, except- 
ing in the domestic trade of these United States. 

If the owner thinks he has reason to fear that 
we desire to escape, he may, without judicial 
investigation, cause us to be imprisoned for 
safekeeping until he shall think proper to take 
us out. If we have escaped, he may publish our 
personal appearance along with a reward for our 
apprehension and return. He may, through con- 
tracts between nations, cause the peace officers 
and police to aid him in recovering his property. 
The captain may change, the owner may change 
— we are sold with the vessel — but so long as 
the fla" does not change there is nothing except 
serious illness or our master's pleasure that will 
release us from the vessel. 

The master, acting for the vessel, may release 
himself and the vessel by paying a few dollars, 
with no alternative. 

He that owns another man's labor power owns 
his body, since the two can not be separated. 

We stand in the same relation to the vessel 
as the serf did to the estate, as the slave to his 
master. When serfdom was abolished in western 
Europe we were forgotten by the liberators and 
our status remained. When the slaves of the 
United States and Brazil were emancipated our 
status continued. W'hen serfdom was abolished 
in Russia no change came to us. 

We now raise our manacled hands in humble 
supplication and pray that the nations issue a 
decree of etnancipation and restore to us our 
right as brother men; to our labor that honor 
which belonged to it until your power, express, 
ing itself through your law, set upon it the "brand 
of bondage in the interest of cheap transporta- 
tion by water. 

We respectfully submit that the serfdom of the 
men in our calling is of comparatively modern 
origin. Earlier maritime law bound, while in 
strange countries and climes, the seaman to his 
shipmates and the ship, and the ship to him, on 
the principle of common hazard. In his own 
countrv he was free — the freest of men. We 



further humbly submit that, as the conscious- 
ness of the seaman's status penetrates through 
the population, it will be impossible to get free- 
nun to send their sons into bondage or to in- 
duce freemen's sons to accept it, and we, m all 
candor, remind you that you, when you travel 
by water, expect us — the serfs — to exhibit in 
danger the highest qualities of freemen by giv- 
ing our lives for your safety. 

.At sea the law of common hazard remains. 
There must be discipline and self-sacrifice, but 
in any harbor the vessel and you are safe, and 
we beseech you give to us that freedom which 
you claim for yourself and which you have be- 
stowed on others, to the end that we may be 
relieved of that bitterness of soul that is the 
heavy burden of him who knows and feels that 
his body is not his own. 

Desertion of Seamen. 

The percentage of seamen who desert from 
.American vessels is relatively small, and deser- 
tion has ceased to be so considerable a factor 
in American shipping affairs as it was in the 
days of sailing vessels. The percentage of sea- 
men who fail to report on board after having 
signed articles before shipping commissioners 
in ports of the United States for the past nine 
years is shown by the following table: 



Year. 


Shipped 

and 
reshipped. 


Failed 
to join. 


Per cent. 


1902 


108,554 
120.785 
112,957 
120.782 
126,745 
143,399 
163.192 
181,032 
185,721 


4,278 
5,187 
3,857 
3,273 
3,894 
4,007 
3,101 
2,114 
2.690 


3.94 


1903 


4.29 


1904 


3.41 


1905 


2.71 


1906 


3.07 


1907 

1 908 


2.79 
1.90 


1909 


1.17 


1910 


1.45 



The facts concerning desertion of seamen from 
.American vessels in foreign ports are even more 
significant. Reports for the past fiscal year have 
been received from 259 American consuktes, 
which cover practically our entire consular rep- 
resentation at foreign maritime ports. These 
reports show the clearances (counting repeated 
voyages) of 1,847 American steamers and 657 
.American sail vessels. The details arc printed in 
Appendix C. The following table shows the 
number of the crews of these vessels, the num- 
ber of seamen shipped and discharged in foreign 
l)orts. and the number of deserters: 



Vessels 


Men. 


Shipped. 


Dis- 
charged. 


De- 
serters 




137,612 
7,001 


15.670 
1,395 


15,335 
1.070 


335 


Sail 


157 






Total 


144.613 


17,065 


16.405 


492 



Out of a total of 144.613 men (counting re- 
peated voyages), only 492 deserted, or scarcely 
1 out of 300 — a percentage so small as to be in- 
appreciable. There are two possible explana- 
tions for these facts. Conditions of life on 
American vessels may be in the main so satis- 
factory that seamen prefer to remain with their 
ships rather than seek by desertion the condi- 
tions of labor in foreign ports or on foreign 
ships. .Another theory was set forth in Senate 
Document Xo. 379, Sixty-first Congress, second 
session, in which certain seamen of the United 
States allege that the seamen "stand in the same 
relation to the vessel as the serf did to the esr 
tate, as the slave to his master." At the Inter- 
national Seamen's Congress held at Copenhagen, 
August n. 1910, the first resolution read: 

"That the following changes and improve- 
ments be made in the maritime legislation of 
every country: 

"1. The abolition of imprisonment of seamen 
deserting ships while in a safe harbor." 

The Copenhagen resolutions and the Senate 
document enumerated concerning the imprison- 
ment of seamen for desertion, so far from being 
progressive, are twelve years behind the legisla- 
tion of the United States. The -Act of Decem- 
ber 21, 1898, abolished the penalty of imprison- 
ment for desertion from American vessels in 
ports of the United States, the Dominion of Can- 
ada, Newfoundland, the West Indies, and Mex- 
ico. More than nine-tenths of the seamen on 
American vessels by the Act of December 21, 
1898, were thus relieved and have been for 
twelve years from the penalty of imprisonment 
for desertion. Outside the countries named the 
law of the United States still provides for ar- 
rest for desertion, but it is a dead letter. The 
reason is expressed concisely by the .American 
consul at Southampton, England, where 121 out 
of 335 desertions from .American steamers oc- 
curred: 

"No recjuests for arrests were made by anj- 
master losing the men. The policy of the mas- 
ters has been to let all such men go, they being 
able at all times to fill all vacancies so created 
in the crew." 

In fact, in foreign ports where imprisonment 
is still permitted bj' our law, last year American 
consuls reported only eight arrests. One sea- 
man was arrested and returned to his ship at 
Tahiti, Society Islands, two at Hakodate, Japan, 
and three at Manila. At Port Elizabeth, Cape 
of Good Hope, the consul caused the arrest of 
one American seaman from the bark Charmer. 
The consul rejiorts: 

"He was arrested by the local authorities and 



imprisoned for a few hours only, and at his own 
request was placed aboard his ship, from whence 
he again deserted and has not since been appre- 
hended." 

The consul at Montevideo caused the arrest of 
a deserter from the whaler Andrew Hicks. 

These facts do not justify any American sea- 
man in the statement against the laws of his 
country: 

"We now raise our manacled hands in humble 
supplication and pray that the nations issue a 
decree of emancipation and restore to us our 
right as brother men." 

The fragment of American law which still au- 
thorizes the arrest of seamen for desertion from 
.American ships in remote ports may well be re- 
pealed because it is a dead letter. Whether for- 
eign nations should repeal their laws providing 
for the arrest and imprisonment of deserting 
seamen from their ships is a matter concerning 
which for obvious reasons this bureau is not 
called upon to express an opinion. 

Abolition of Imprisonment for Desertion. 

The law permitting the imprisonment of sea- 
men for desertion from American vessels in 
ports of the United States and in near-by foreign 
ports was repealed by the Act of December 21, 
1898. As our ships seldom cross the oceans, 
that Act covers practically all phases of Amer- 
ican navigation. It was not followed by in- 
creased desertions nor did it impair discii)line 
on shipboard. .At present a seaman deserting 
from an .American ship in the harbors of Eu- 
rope, .Asia, Africa, Australia, Oceania, and South 
.America south of the Caribbean Sea may be im- 
prisoned, hew .American ships visit those ports, 
and out of their total crews not one man in a 
hundred deserts. There are virtually no cases 
of imprisonment. When a man deserts an 
-American ship abroad, he is rarely interfered 
with and not infrequently he regrets his course 
and appeals to the American consul for assis- 
tance. There are more cases of complaint that 
men have been driven to desert than of com- 
plaint of arrest after desertion. The remnant 
of law actually serves only one purpo>e to fur- 
nish ground for rhetorical protest that .American 
seamen are treated as chattels and that the law 
keeps them in fetters and is a survival of the 
spirit of the fugitive-slave law. The repeal of 
the statute on which the coinplaint is based was 
recommended last year, and the recommendation 
is renewed. It can be brought about by a sim- 
ple act of few words, declaring that imprison- 
ment as a penalty for desertion of seamen from 
vessels of the United States is hereby abolished 
and Sections 4596 and 4600 of the Revised Stat- 
utes as amended by the Act of December 21, 
189,^. are hereby amended accordingly. 



Tlie tcndenc}' on the part of ['.ritish 
sliipowners to estaljlish a regular steam- 
shi]) trade l)et\veen ports on the Pacific 
coast and the United Kint^dom has drawn 
favorable comment from the port authori- 
ties in Aancouver. The Bltie Funnel line 
has nine steamers on a monthly service 
between Great liritain and Vancouver, via 
the Orient and Suez. The Harrison line 
maintains a similar schedule between 
(^ireat liritain and \'ancouver, but by way 
of the Straits of Magellan, willi four ves- 
sels. The Maple Leaf line is compara- 
tively a new factor in the deep-sea trade, 
running from Xevv York to X'ancouver 
via the Straits of Magellan and carrying 
outward cargoes to Europe. This line runs 
one l:)oat every five weeks, and probably 
an additional boat will be placed on the 
run during the present year. The ^laple 
Leaf line also loads steamers regularly on 
the Pacific coast for the west coast of 
England, and these steamers carry con- 
siderable (|uantities of canned goods. It 
is ])robablc that this service will be ex- 
tended to .Manchester, where there is an 
excellent market for the products of Brit- 
ish Columbia, including limber. Ijarley, 
ore, canned fruit, etc. 



Three new l.^.OOO-ton mail steamers for 
the England-Soutii African service have 
been ordered by the rnit)n-Castle Mail 
Steamship Co. (Ltd.) from P.elfast. They 
will have a guaranteed si)eed of 23 knots 
aufl possess many attractive features 
which will add to the comfort of passen- 
gers. These boats represent the first in- 
stallment of an accelerated buihiing ])ro- 
gram under the new mail contract. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



A Raise for Postal Men. 

Promotion for 13,000 railway postal clerks 
on October 1, so it is reported, will be pro- 
vided in orders to be issued by the Post- 
master-General. In the railway mail serv- 
ice there are 16,700 clerks and a majority 
of those not promoted on October 1 will 
receive more pay before the end of the 
current fiscal year. More than $1,000,000 
will be expended in making the promo- 
tions. A reorganization of the railway 
mail service and increased pay for postal 
clerks were authorized in the recently en- 
acted postofifice appropriation bill. Tlie 
new law provides for three classes of r.'iii- 
way postal lines with their transfer and 
terminal offices. The compensation wil' 
be higher for lines on which work is 
heaviest, beginning with $900 a year. All 
clerks who render faithful and efficient 
service will receive annual raises of $100 
until they reach the maximum of the suc- 
cessive annual grades for which they may 
be promoted for specially m.eritorious serv- 
ice until their pay reaches $1,800 a year. 
Chief clerks in the railway mail service 
receive salaries of $2,000. Hitherto it has 
been the custom to promote railway clerks 
only when vacancies occur from death, 
vacancy, or removal. Hereafter railway 
clerks will have assurance of annual pro- 
motion, so long as they faithfully dir,- 
charge their duties. This is the method aj;- 
plied satisfactorily for several years in ad- 
justing the compensation of postofifice 
clerks and city letter carriers, but the range 
of salaries for railway clerks will be higher 
because of the hazardous character of their 
work. 



Operators Decline. 

Some time ago the Governor of West 
Virginia inaugurated a movement whereby 
the dififerences existing between the coal 
operators and the coal miners in the Ka- 
nawha and other districts of the State, 
where a controversy is raging, could be 
settled by arbitration. The miners in- 
dorsed the plan, and were ready to sub- 
mit their grievances to an arbitration 
board. The fields in question are not en- 
tirely union, there being a large number of 
non-union men involved. The operators, 
owing to this fact, refuse to accept arbi- 
tration as a plan of settlement, protesting 
that neither the union nor non-union men 
would abide by any decision arrived at. 
There is a committee appointed by the 
Governor making an investigation. 



Enforce New Postal Law. 

The Postmaster-General has issued the 
necessary orders and instructions for put- 
ting into efifect the newspaper and periodi- 
cal publicity law, the first returns of wdiich 
must be made October 1. Appropriate re- 
turn blanks are being mailed to all pub- 
lishers. The law requires that publishers 
shall file on the first days of October and 
April of each year, both with the Post- 
master-General and with the local post- 
masters, under penalty of the denial of the 
use of the mails, sworn returns of the 
names and addresses of the owner, pub- 
lisher, editor, managing editor and business 
manager of all newspapers and periodicals, 



with the exception of religious, fraternal, 
temperance and scientific publications, and 
also, when a corporation, the names of the 
holders of the stocks, bonds or other se- 
curities, and in the case of daily news- 
papers, a statement of the average paid 
circulation for the preceding six months. 
.All editorial or other reading matter ap- 
pearing in a newspaper or magazine for 
the publication of which pay is accepted or 
promised must be marked "Advertisement," 
under a fine of not less than $50 nor moie 
than $500. According to the terms of the 
law trade-union publications are not in the 
excepted class, and will be compelled to 
make report the same as other newspapers 
and periodicals. 



Street-Car Arbitration. 

According to the Union Leader, the of- 
ficial jniblication of the street-car employes 
of Chicago, 111., an agreement for arbitra- 
tion on the surface lines has been signed 
with the Chicago Street Railway Company, 
and the decision which will be rendered 
by the arbitration board will become ef- 
fective with both the elevated and surface 
companies. Judge Scanlan will represent 
the street-car men on the arbitration board, 
and Harvey B. Fleming, vice-president of 
the City Railway Company, has been nomi- 
nated to represent the traction companies. 
'I he selection of a third member has not 
yet been announced. The questions to be 
arbitrated are : Hours of service for train- 
men, week days and Sundays, including 
fall backs for meals; question of night cars, 
hours of labor and wages paid trainmen 
thereon ; wages of all trainmen, including 
trainmen on si)rinkler, cinder, supply, and 
other cars; wages and working conditions 
for car repairing, and numerous other 
classes of labor. President Mahon, of the 
international organization, who has been 
appointed to present the case of the street- 
car employes before the arbitration board, 
with an active sub-committee, is engaged 
in preparing for the big task of presenting 
the case. 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



Preparing Plans. 

Naval instructors are at work on the 
plans for the battleship Pennsylvania. The 
Pennsylvania will carry twelve 14-inch 
guns. This is a heavier armament than is 
possessed by any United States battleship 
or any European fighting ship at the pres- 
ent time. Her length, it is reported, will 
1)e 630 feet, 55 feet longer than that of the 
largest battleship in this navy, built or 
building. Her beam will be between 95 
and 100 feet, permitting her to pass through 
the Panama Canal locks. With the in- 
creased length the Pennsylvania will gain 
in speed more than one knot over the 
twenty-one knots which the New York is 
expected to make. It has not yet been 
decided whether turbine or reciprocating 
type of engines will be installed. The 
vessel will use only oil as fuel, and the 
economy in space resulting by the elimina- 
tion of coal bunkers and the substitution 
of oil tanks will in part contribute to her 
ability to make speed. Her tannage will 
be about 31,000 tons. 

(Continued on Page 11.) 



International Seamen's Union of America, 570 
West Lake St., Chicago, III. 

Atlantic District. 

Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union, 51 South St 
New York, N. Y. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
Atlantic, 42 South St., New York. 

Inland Seamen's Union, Whitehall, New York. 

Harbor Boatmen's Union, 214 West St, New 
York, N. Y. 

Lake District. 

Lake Seamen's Union, 570 West Lake St., 
Chicago, 111. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Great Lakes, 71 Main St., Bufifalo, N. Y. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Union of Great 
Lakes, 55 Main St., BuiTalo, N. Y. 
Pacific District. 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 44-46 East St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
the Pacific, 91 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of the 
Pacific, 51 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Alaska Fishermen's Union, 93 Steuart St San 
rrancisco, Cal. 

United Fishermen of Pacific, Box 42 Seattle 
Wash. ' 

liay and River Steamboatmen's Union 51 
Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia- 
29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 
1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 
Queens Chambers, Wellington, N Z 
Palnierston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z 
Carnngton, Newcastle, N. S. W. 
Maritime I'.ldg., Melbourne, Victoria 
Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 
25 Arcade, Brisbane, Queensland 
Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 
Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 
Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland 
Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 
Fatnot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Road, London, E. 
England. 

Hull Seamen's and Firemen's Union 1 Rail- 
way St., Hull. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, Dubois- 
straat 12, Antwerp, Belgium. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin P. O. 16, Germany. 

FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scnpts Maritimes de France, Marseille, 11 Place 
de la Joliette. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Quay Videcog, Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Sjomands Forbund, 15 Rosenberg gar- 
den, Bergen, Norway. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Kobenhavn, Toldbod- 
gade 15, Denmark. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, Kobenhavn, St. An- 
napalads 22, Denmark. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 

ITALY. 

h'ederazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori de! 
Mare, Genova, Tiazza L. Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 

AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
bciter und Arbeiterinnen Cesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Boschetto 5, Austria. 

SPAIN. 

Fcderacion Nacional de Obereros de Mar de 
Butjues v puerto, Barcelona Mayor, 44, 2, 1 
(liarccloneta), Spain. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad de Resistencia de Foguistas, Monte- 
video, Calle 25 de Agosto No. 219, Uruguay. 

ARGENTINA. 

I'ederacion Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




According to cable news from 
across the water, the union London 
dockers are rapidly being re-em- 
ployed. In some cases conflicts have 
taken place between them and the 
so-called "free" laborers. Now that 
the strike is over the latter have no 
friends. 

An Australian Government return 
shows that in the first year's opera- 
tions of the Commonwealth Old-Age 
and Invalidity Pensions Act ending 
June 30 last, a total of 16,538 per- 
sons received benefits. The expen- 
diture was £2,147,034, and the cost 
of administration £41,784. The pro- 
portions of persons per 10,000 head 
of population receiving old age pen- 
sions in the various States were: 
New South Wales, 177; Victoria, 179; 
Queensland, 168; South Australia, 
173; West Australia, 110; Tasmania, 
207. 

At the recent session of the In- 
ternational Miners' Congress at 
Amsterdam the English delegates 
proposed a uniform policy of work- 
ing five days per week, and the con- 
gress acted favorably upon the pro- 
posal. The date on which to in- 
augurate the shorter work week was 
left in abeyance until the next ses- 
sion of the congress. The congress 
also committed itself to the plan, 
as a safety measure, to the employ- 
ment of mine inspectors elected by 
the miners and paid by the State, 
the mines to be inspected as often 
as the men demand it. 

Arrangements are to be made to 
commence a campaign for the pur- 
pose of amalgamating all of the un- 
ions connected with the tailoring and 
clothiers' trade in Great Britain un- 
der the title of the United Garment 
Workers' Union. There are at pres- 
ent some twenty separate societies 
dealing with various sections of this 
industry. Under the auspices of the 
General Federation of Trades Un- 
ions a conference has been held at 
Nottingham, the result of which was 
the appointment of a committee to 
draw up a scheme and rules for the 
proposed amalgamation. 

The Sydney (N. S. W.) Harbor 
Trust, in response to representa- 
tions by its employes, has raised 
their rates of pay, which are now 
as follows: Bricklayers' laborers, 
powder monkeys, pile pointers, lead- 
ing crane hands, winch drivers and 
drainers, 10s. per day; pile drivers, 
12s. 6d.; hammer and drill men, 
concrete men, spawlers, scabblers, 
blacksmiths' strikers and carpenters' 
mates, 9s. 8d.; fitters and plasterers' 
laborers, crush feeders, scaffold men 
and drivers of air compressors, 9s. 
6d.; pick and shovel men, tipmen and 
maintenance men, 9s.; builders' la- 
borers, 9s. 6d. 

After considering the appeal of the 
New Zealand Federation of Labor 
for financial aid for the Waihi and 
Reefton miners, the executive of the 
Labor Council of New South Wales 
submitted the following: "The Well- 
ington and Auckland Labor Coun- 
cils having turned down the appeal 
on the grounds that the dispute is 
not with the employers, but against 
the right of a body of men (Engine 
Drivers and Firemen) to have a 
separate union, your committee rec- 
ommends that no appeal be issued 
by the Council." After prolonged 
debate the recommendation was 
adopted by a majority of 3, the vot- 
ing being 61 to 58. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Cannon's Clothing Store 

Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

Special Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

Men's Suits Made to Order 

515 FRONT-516 BEACON STS. .... SAN PEDRO 



M. BROWIN 

THE SAN FRANCISCO CLOTHING STORE AND OUTFITTER 

EXCLUSIVE AGENT FOR 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

-»27 RROIVT STREET SAIN PEDRO 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Angeles Beers 
All goods sold at lowest San Francisco prices. We buy direct from Kentucky 
Distilleries and our California Wineries. Seafaring men invited to Inspect our stock. 
Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

CLOTHES ! ! ! 

Tailored to SUIT YOU at a reasonable price is what you get 
when you leave your order with 

S. G. SWANSON 

641 SOUTH BEACON STREET 
Next door to the Postoffice San Pedro, California 

Union Label Tailoring and satisfied customers is our best advertisement. 

NOTICE — Why not you, be one of our pleased patrons. Blue serges and 

the season's late styles in woolens always to be found here. 




him. Loose labels 



UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 

When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Isabel is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
n retail stores are counterfeits. 



JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary. 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



WILL BE A MOTHER TO YOU 
Fix your clothes, sew the rips, re- 
pair the tears, fasten the buttons, etc. 
We really clean your clothes by our 

French Dry Cleaning Process 

which is entirely different from the 

mere "sponging and pressing" method. 

We Call and Deliver 

The French Dye WorKs 

612 BEACON STREET 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



INFORMATION WANTED, 

Martin Olsen, height 6 feet, weight 
225 pounds, missing since Christmas, 
is inquired for by Riggers' and 
Stevedores' Union, Steuart and Fol- 
som streets, San Francisco. 

John Moen, born 1878 in Norway, 
height 6 feet, is inquired for by his 
father, John Olson Moen, of Lansing, 
Iowa. 

Ole Jenson Lovig (sometimes writ- 
ten Oluf Jenson Lovig), a native of 
Norway, born at Stavanger, Hogs 
ijords; about 54 years old; height, 5 
feet, 9 inches; weight, about 170 
pounds; light complexion; blue eyes; 
last seen at Vancouver, B. C, in 1905. 
Any one able to give any information 
kindly communicate with his brother, 
Jonas Lovig, No. 2414J4 30th St., 
Tacoma, Wash. 

Charles S. Barker, born near St. 
Peter, Nicollet County, Minn., wishes 
to hear from his father, Charles Wm. 
Barker, who left Brookings County, 
S. D., for Oregon, and was going 
sailing again in 1889, and was last 
heard from in Coos County, Ore. Is 
fond of hunting and trapping; has 
been master; sailed out of New York 
City and Boston. Age about 80; 
height about 6 feet; bald headed, 
eyes gray, hair dark. 



San Pedro News Co. 

Sixth and Beacon Streets, San Pedro, Cal. 

Dealers in 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Agents 

Harbor Steam Laundry 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



The United States Shipping Com- 
missioner at Philadelphia, Pa., re- 
quests the following named seamen to 
communicate with him: Gust Leyrle, 
arrived at Philadelphia, October 2, 
1908, on ship Dirigo; Gustav Mattson 
and Victor Wilson, on schooner 
Charles Davenport, March, 1911. 

George Albert Vaughan, aged 47, 
of Handsworth, Birmingham, Eng- 
land. Was in New York city in 1902; 
worked as steward on New York and 
South American boats. Important. 
Address, Rev. R. C. Cookson, 96 
Monroe street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Herman Bjorckbom Eknas, a na- 
tive of Finland, born 1874, is inquired 
for by his Drother Evert. Address, 
Sailors' Union, San Francisco. 

Alexander Benson, native of St. 
John, N. F., last heard of in Canada, 
now supposed to be on the Pacific 
Coast, is urgently inquired for by his 
mother. Address, Mrs. A. Benson, 
King's Bridge, St. John's, N. F. 

John West, who was on the 
steamer Horatius in June, 1912, is 
inquired for by P. Ivers, River Dar- 
ling, via Wenthworth, Australia. 
Please notify Sup't., No. 1 State 
street, New York. 

The United States Shipping Com- 
missioner, at New York, is desirous 
of locating the relatives or heirs of 
James Clark, a native of Maine, born 
1854. The deceased has a balance of 
$41.10 due him. 



San Pedro Letter List. 

Antrosen, Karla L.Trson, Laurits 
Anderson, Otto -1738Larsen, Einar A. 

Airo, Oscar Larson, I.«uis -1008 

Andersen, Ben. Latz, K. 

Anderson, J. -1099 Larsen, C. 

Anderson, Victor Michel, Bertheli 

-1630 Moulas, Nick 

Alexandersen, P. Meyer, William 
Andree, E. A. -1410 Malmgren, Eric 

Aspe, T. Machada, Enrique 

Anderson, G. Mikeleit, E. (Keg. 
Anderson, Gust -1534 Letter) 

Anderson, S. Mark, Frank 

Anderson, Fred Markman, H. 

Anderson, J. G. Mauchada, Henry 

Andersen, H^arald McGutre, Owen T. 

Brusbard, Ewald Mattson, J. -1388 
Bengtsson. C. -1924 Markwardt, Carl 

Beyerle, Rupert Murphy, Ambrose 

BohnhofC. Harry Matlsen. Hendrik 

Benson, Charlie Mellerup, Jens 

Bredberg, Henry Matsen Hemming A. 

Ban, Martin Nordman. John D. 

Bredesen, John Nilsen, Anders 

Berg, H. T. Nelsen. C. J. 

Bulander, B. B. Nutman. Harry 

Bergman, E. Nielsen, P. W. 

Bloom, Frank A. Nordman, Jon 
Bodahl, Hans -1746 Nielsen, Alf -1054 

Boardsen, Ed. Nurken, Herman 

Broders, Hajo Nordstrom. Ben 

Buchtman, F. Nystrom, Ragnar E. 

Conners. Jack Nelson, Nils S. 

Clausen, J. Nelson, Anton 

Carlsson, A, -1220 Nelsson, Emil -552 

Christensen, H. P. Norman, L. 

Carlson, Dick Nielsen, Sivcrt 

Christophersen, R. Nelson, Nils 

Doyle. William Olson. P. 

. Daugul. Alfred Olsen, Nick 

Enstrom, Karl Olsen, Wm. 

Ellis, Jack Olsson. Hans 794 

Edgerton. Jack Olssen, H. -714 

Eichel, Erlck Olsen, Martin 

Ellingsen, Eduard Olsen, O. P. -1141 

Edwards, Walter Owen. Fred 

Erickson, Edward Olsen. George 

Frandsen, L. M. Osterhahn, J. W. 

Fasig, Don Peron, Edmimd 

Glencross, Harry Petterson, Viggo 
Guthre, Raymond -1322 

Gusek, B. Peterson, Henry 

Green. Frank Peterson, Olof (Reg. 
Glasse, Gust. Lr.) 

Geiger. Joseph Pede'rsen, Peder 

Gotz. Rudolf Potet. Emile 

Gustafson, J. Peterson, Loui 

Groszewskl, Fritz Peterson, Patrick 

Hjort. Knud Pommer, John 

Helinius, Oscar Petrich. Theodor 

Hannus, Alex Penningrud. L. 

Halto. Waine Rasmussen. Arthur 

Hoft. Hans Richardson, E. E. 

Hakonsen, John Reuter, Charles 

Hansen. Berger Rajala, Victor 

Hendenskog, John Retal. F. O. 

Hart, Philip Risbeck. Gustav 

Holgren, G. J. Rasmussen, Rasmus 
Hendersen, A'. -1631Remerd. J. 

Halvorsen, H. -595 Rutter, Fritz 

House, James E. Swensen. C. E. 

Haggar. F. W. Stammerjohan, Hans 

Ingebretsen. Ingolf Sorensen. J. 

Jones. Auber B. Selking, Ben 

Jones. Harry Schafer. Ernest 

Jones. Arthur Slgnard, Walter 

.Tersh. Billy Schmld, John -2579 

Johnsen, Gunnar Schmld, F. 

Jensen, J. Frank Sassl, Wilhelm 

Johnson, Arthur Scott, Ed. 

Johanssen, Fritz Sorensen. Michael 

Johnsen, Walter Sandstrom. Ivar 
Johnssen, C. -2016 Strahle. Chas. 
Jacobsen. John (Reg. Letter) 

Johnson, Ole Sides, William 

Jacobsen, Anders Sievers, G. 

Johansson, A. -1874 Schmid, J. 

Johnson. Axel J. Swanson. .Tullus 

Jonassen, C. Sa.s.son, John 

Johnsen, John Smith, Henry 

Johnson, Axel Smith, J. S. 

Johnsen, J. K. -1715 Smith, John V. 
J'ohnson. O. (Capt.Svanson, Ben 

Starr, Reg. Lrr.) Tammi, Emil 

Irwin, Robert Tomsen, Peder 

Kohlmeister, O. Thorn, Arvld 

Klaessen, Karl A. ToIIefsen, R. 

Karlsen, Jacob Torbjornsen, Andrew 

Kumm. Chas. V. Thorsen. J. 

Kopatz, Oscar ' Togersen. Anton 

Kern, Max Wilson. Harry 

Kilman, Gunnar Ward, H. 

Karlson. R. flappa, KostI 

Kuhne, W. Wahrenberg. Otto 

Kerleau, Alex Ziebel. Albert 
Kosze, Franz (Reg.Zoe. Francois 

L.) Younggren. E. 
Lundmark. Helge PHOTOS AND 

Larson. Martin -1710 PACK;.\GES. 

Lewis, George H. Mikeleit, E. 

Larsen. Martin Axelsen, W. 

Lange, Ingolf de Boy. Geo. 

Ludewig. Edmond Kees. L. 

Leino. Fred Manners, C 

Lister, W. Schroeder. Ernst 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^WWVWWNi'N/V.V^^^^^V^'N^^J^ 



YOU NEED NOT BE BROKE 
WHEN IN SAN PEDRO 

I buy and sell new and second- 
hand goods that have any value. 

I also do Gun and Locksmithing, 
Upholstering and Mattress Making. 

N. MANN 

335 BEACON STREET, San Pedro 

Near 4th Street 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

Emanuel Nyreen, a native of Abo, 
Finland, was member of crew of 
revenue-cutter Dexter, in 1908. Please 
communicate H. H. Rohrbach, New- 
ton Theological Institute, New Cen- 
ter, Mass. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



The well-known schooner O. M. Kellogg has 
been sold by the Charles Nelson Company to 
Atkins, Kroll & Co. She will be placed on 
berth for Samoa. 

Coast exporters are losing no time in snapping 
up steam tonnage as soon as it becomes avail- 
able. With the heavy export trade to the Orient 
the demand for lumber in Australia and the 
wheat season beginning the rates remain firm, 
with an active market. 

An idea of the rapidity with whicli the sailing 
ship is disappearing is conveyed in figures given 
in the new volumes of Lloyd's Register. The 
world's sailing vessel fleet now totals little more 
than 4,000,000 tons, whereas the merchant steam- 
ers of the globe are in excess of 40,000,000. On 
the assumption that one ton of steam is equal 
to three of sail, steamers now do thirty times 
as much of the carrying trade as sailing craft. 

United States District Attorney John L. Mc- 
Nab at San Francisco has been notified by the 
immigration authorities that nine Japanese mem- 
bers of the crew of the steamer ATina Brea es- 
caped from the vessel while at the dock at Point 
Richmond. The Mina Brea had just arrived 
from Talara, Peru. Proceedings will be taken 
against Captain J. Thomas, master of the ves- 
sel, to collect a heavy fine for allowing the men 
to escape. 

The new act of Congress, requiring that all 
passenger steamers carry two wireless operators, 
went into efifect on October 1, and hereafter at 
all times of the day and night there will be 
"sparks" hovering over the key, prepared to 
catch any "S. O. S." call that mav be flashing 
through the ether. Nearly 100 additional opera- 
tors are required to fill the new posts. The fair 
sex has already gone into the field, and it is 
predicted that ere long there will be more than 
one mistress of the key in the coastwise service. 

United States Surveyor John G. Mattos, Jr., of 
San Francisco, reports a considerable increase 
in the business of this port since last spring. 
He says that the Appraisers' store is nearly filled 
with valuable merchandise undergoing examina- 
tion. On September 2Sth there arrived at this 
port the largest cargo of valuable goods ever 
brought here in one vessel, the record-breaker 
being the Crown of Galicia. All the Appraisers' 
force has been put to work on the cargo and 
the work of appraisement is going on at top 
speed. 

The well-known Norwegian steamer Thor, 
which operated in the coal traffic between Na- 
nainio and San Francisco, is now under charter 
to Frank Waterhouse & Co. and has changed 
her route for the transpacific run. The Thor 
left Columbia River a few days ago laden with 
a cargo of flour for Hongkong. The vessel was 
fixed to take the place of the steamer Fitzclar- 
ence, which, owing to a fire in her sulphur cargo 
a few weeks ago, was unable to fill the charter 
and it was necessary that the flour should reach 
China at an early date. 

The immigration authorities were amazed at 
the number of Asiatic passengers on board the 
Pacific Mail liner Korea which arrived at San 
Francisco on September 30. There were 332 
Chinese in the steerage quarters, over ISO of 
whom were destined for Calexico. Mexico. It is 
said that they were induced to take passage by 
unscrupulous Chinese agents in the Orient, who 
told them that shortly after their arrival in Mex!- 
ico the republic would be annexed by the United 
States and they would become citizens. Quite a 
number of these immigrants will be deported by 
the authorities. 

Captain K. Noda of the Nippon Yusen Kaisha 
liner Yokohama Maru, says that his company is 
obliged to turn away freight ofl^ered at both 
ends of the run, and has decided to place in 
the Puget Sound service two boats now on the 
European route, the Kamo Maru, 8524 tons, and 
the Tango Maru, 7463 tons. The Tamba Maru 
and Inaba Maru, smaller boats, now plying 
across the Pacific, probably will be withdrawn. 
An unconfirmed rumor is current in Kobe of 
the building of a 10,000-ton liner for the Puget 
Sound service. Two big boats for the European 
trade are on the stocks in Japanese yards. 

Two more big freighters have been chartered 
for the Australian lumber trade, for which there 
is just now a heavy demand. The Norwegian 
steamer Mathilda and the British steamer Frank- 
by will both load at North Pacific ports for the 
Antipodes. The Mathilda is now under charter 
to the Government to carry coal from Newport 
News to San Francisco. According to advices 
received she has been fixed to load lumber, for 
Australia by G. W. McNear & Co. on time 
charter for one voyage. The Frankby, which 
was last reported at Valparaiso, has been taken 
by the .Xmericnn Trading Company and will be 
delivered to her charterers here. 

Carrying what is claimed to be the largest 
cargo of the kind ever shipped in one vessel the 
Harrison Line steamer Politician, Captain Wool- 



finder, left San Francisco on September 30, 
destined for London and Liverpool, via Magel- 
lan. The canned goods consignment in the holds 
of the huge freighter amounted to 250,000 cases. 
The Politician is the largest Harrison carrier to 
come to the North Pacific in the company's new 
service and is a strong example of the evolution 
in the trade between the Pacific and Eneland. 
The canned goods cargo carried by the Politi- 
cian would fill the holds of three sailing vessels, 
which formerly handled this traffic. 

The steamer Admiral Farragut, recently pur- 
chased on the east coast by the Alaska-Pacific 
Steamship Company, has left Philadelphia en 
route to the Pacific to join the coastwise service. 
Captain E. D. Bartlett, formerly of the steamer 
Watson, is in command of the vessel out from 
the Atlantic. The Admiral Farragut is a sister 
ship of the Admiral Sampson, now in the Alas- 
kan service, but shortly to return to the San 
Francisco-Puget Sound run. Upon her arrival 
the Farragut will be completely overhauled and 
remodeled. Similar changes to those made in 
the Admiral Sampson when she was brought 
around will be effected. She will probably not 
enter the service until spring. 

A case of many contested points, of particu- 
lar interest to shipping and marine insurance 
men, will shortly be heard in the courts, when 
the action of the Globe Navigation Company 
against the underwriters who held the insurance 
on the schooner William Nottingham will be 
started. For nearly a year efforts to settle 
the case out of court have failed. In October, 

1911, the schooner was disabled of? the Columbia 
River while en route to the west coast, lumber 
laden. Salvage and average claims followed in 
fast succession until the case was involved in a 
maze of intricacies. For a time the disposition 
of the vessel was undecided, but she is now 
being repaired as the demand for tonnage makes 
her idleness costly. 

Captain W. H. Logan, special agent of tin- 
London Salvage Association, who is on board 
the steamer Salvor of the British Columbia Sal- 
vage Company, engaged in the work of raising 
the Pacific Mailer Newport at Balboa, reports by 
telegranh that the job is progressing satisfactor- 
ily. No particulars were given. The salvors 
have considerable work to do before they can 
raise the sunken vessel. When the warehouse 
on the wharf at which the Newport was moored 
at Balboa collapsed two sixty-ton cranes fell 
across the deck of the vessel and tons of debris 
from the warehouse also piled on the steamer. 
This is being cleared before anything can be 
done to lift the steamer. It is expected that the 
Salvor will tow the Newport to this port after 
floating her. 

The shipyards of the United States during the 
current fiscal year will be more busily employed 
than in a decade, according to returns on file 
with the Bureau of Navigation. On July 1, 

1912, the shipyards reported that 120 steel ves- 
sels, aggregating 254,000 gross tons, were under 
construction or under contract to be built, 
against barely 100,000 gross tons at the same 
time last year. Tonnage building on the Great 
Lakes shows a falling ofif of about 10,000 tons, 
compared with a year ago, and part of the cur- 
rent year's lake construction is designed for salt- 
water use. The influence of the coming opening 
of the Panama Canal is manifest, as upward of 
80.000 tons are building for use through the 
canal. Preparations for the use of oil, instead of 
coal, are found in most shipbuilding returns and 
fifteen tank steamers, ranging from 2200 tons to 
6500 tons are building. 

On her maiden voyage to the North Pacific, 
which will take her through many seas, the new 
United States revenue cutter Unalga. Captain 
Richard O. Crisp, left Hampton Roads a few 
days ago. - Ahead of the sturdy little Govern- 
ment craft is a run of 18,403 nautical miles. 
From Norfolk the Unalga goes straight to 
Gibraltar. Her subsequent itinerary is as fol- 
lows: Malta, Naples, Port Said, Aden, Colom- 
bo, Singapore, Manila and Yokohama and thence 
to this Coast. It is figured that the Unalga will 
make the trip in 1845 hours (seventy-six days 
and twenty-one hours) actual steaming time. It 
is estimated that she will burn 1380 tons of 
coal for the trip, costing $9000. In addition will 
be the canal dues, amounting to $641, and other 
expenses. The decision to send the cutter to 
.Maska by way of the Suez Canal in.stead of 
through the Strait of Magellan, was based whollj' 
upon the cost. The saving is in fuel. The new 
craft is 190 feet over all, 173 feet 6 inches long 
between perpendiculars, 32 feet 6 inches beam 
and 17 feet 6 inches depth. Her armament con- 
sists of four six-pounder machine guns, in addi- 
tion to small arms for the crew, which numbers 
sixty-two men exclusive of the officers. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an offi- 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims 
of all seafarers careful attention. 324 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg., Third Floor, Califr.rnia St., near 
Montgomery. Telephone, Kearny 394; Home, 
C 3832. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 
and 
INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' FED- 
ERATION. 



THOS. A. HANSON, 
570 West Lake St, Chicago, 111. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 51 South St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON. Mass., 1%A Lewis St. 
PORTLAND, Me., 377A Fore St. 
PHILADELPHIA. Pa., 206 Moravian St 
BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway 
NORFOLK. Va., 221 Water St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Contl St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 535 St. Ann St 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 4 South St. Telephone 1879 

Broad. Night Call 8374 Spring. 
New York Branch. 400 West St. Telephone 5153 
Chelsea. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 258 Commercial St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 53 St. Ann SL 
BALTIMORE, Md.. 802-804 South Broadway. 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Conti St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION OF NEW YORK 
AND VICINITY. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 214 West St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL. N. Y. 



LAKES DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, 111., 570 West Lake St. 

Branches: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND, O,. 1401 W. 9th St. 
MILWAUKEE. Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
TOLEDO, O., 54 Main St. 
N. TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St 
ERIE, Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
DETROIT, Mich.. 7 Woodbrldge St.. East 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich.. 108 Fifth Ave. 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave 
PORT HURON, Mich., 517 Water St 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O., 1185 W. Eleventh St. 
CHICAGO, III., 445 La Salle Ave. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbrldge St., East. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 151 Reed St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1814 Fourth St. 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y.. 55 Main St.. Tel. Seneca 2295. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O., 1401 West Ninth St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 151 Reed St. 
CHICAGO, III., 314 N. Clark St. 
ASHTABULA, O.. 74 Bridge St 
TOLEDO, O.. 54 Main St. 
DETROIT. Mich.. 7 East Woodbridge St 
PT. HURON,. Mich.. 517 Water SL 
CONNEAUT. O.. 922 Day St 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
N. TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. ' 
ERIE. Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111.. 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 

PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 44-4S East SL 

Branches: 

SqVICTORIA, B. C, Old Court Rooms. Bastion 

^,^^^^^^^^^'^^^ ^^- L*^'^'"' Temple. Cor. Homer 
and Dnnsmuir, P. O. Box 1365 

o^fSr^x^' Wash., 2218 North 30th SL 
SS^r"^^'^' Wash., 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 65 
Box^J TOWNSEND, Wash.. 114 Qulncy St , P. O. 
ABERDEEN, Wash.. P. O. Box 6 

n?ToT4'\'^'A ,°'"^o-,;," ""'"" Ave!, Box 2100. 
ETTr:EKA. Cal., 227 F rst St.. P. O Box 64 
SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 67 
HONOLULU, H. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts.. 

r. \J. rJOX J14. 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBUSHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



WALTER MACARTHUR Editor 

PAUL SCHARRENBERG Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six months - - $1.00 
Advertising Rates on Application. 



Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each weel?. 



To insure a prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 



Headquarters of the Sailors' TTnion of the Pacific, 
44-46 East Street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the .lOURN.AL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
f^nd address. 1'he JOtTRNAI^ Is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9. 1912. 



'•TXCITIXG REBELLION." 



According to press reports about -WOO 
mine vvorker.s emplo\'ed in the Bingham, 
Utah, mines have gone on strike and estab- 
lished armed camps to prevent work from 
being resumed. It is reported that the stri- 
kers are all foreigners, mostly Greeks, unfa- 
miliar with American institutions and in 
most cases unable to understand English. 

Something must be radically wrong with 
labor conditions in the I'ingham mines, 
when the men have been worked up to a. 
state of mind in which they are willing to 
take chances on a conflict with civil and 
military authorities, rather than remain at 
work. Ordinarily the Greeks are content 
to work in this country for the lowest 
wages and under conditions that are re- 
garded with disgust by the .\merican work- 
ingman. ^len so easily pleased do not feel 
the necessity of improvement, and it is a 
fact that the efforts of the labor move- 
ment to ameliorate their conditions have 
failed for that very reason. 

"Against ignorance the gods themselves 
fight in vain." 

Conditions in the Bingham mines must 
therefore have been so degrading that they 
were unbearable, even to Greeks. 

Phil. Francis, who writes for the San 
Francisco Call, pretends to believe that 
the whole trouble has been caused by 
"agitators," and advocates the arrest of 
Charles Moyer, President of the Western 
Federation of Miners, upon the charge of 
treason for "inciting armed rebellion." 
"Get Moyer behind the bars," says Phil., 
and everything will be lovely. 

Of course. Brother Francis does not at- 
tempt to present any proof that Moyer is 
in any way responsible for the present 
state of affairs in Bingham. To his unso- 
phisticated mind the fact that Moyer is 
the head of the Miners' Federation is con- 
clusive proof of his guilt. 

Very naturally the critic refrains from 
"entering into any discussion about the 
men's grievances." If he were to do so it 



might become apparent that labor condi- 
tions and not the "agitators" are responsi- 
1)le for the "rebellion." 

We do not wish to be understood as ap- 
proving the action of the Bingham miners 
in attempting to prevent the operation of 
the mines by physical force. To employ 
brute force in a trade dispute is not only 
wrong morally but is extremely bad pol- 
icy, whether for employers or strikers. 

We simply make the point that the 
"remedy" proposed in the "Call" is no 
remedy at all ; on the contrary, it would 
make matters worse. 

What ought to be done is to have a full 
and fair investigation to ascertain the real 
causes of the affair and take steps to rem- 
edy them. 

It does not take a prophet to be able to 
predict that the real causes will be found 
in brutalizing conditions of work, low pay, 
long hours, and a petty system of graft 
such as is generally being practiced on 
workingmen, who are ignorant and unor- 
ganized. 

When the "Call" can devise means of 
abolishing these conditions, there will be 
no need of urging that the law against 
high treason and like crimes be invoked. 



TARIFF AND WAGES. 



The Atlantic Alonthly publishes an ex- 
ceptionally good discussion on Protection 
that has great bearing upon the main issue 
in the national campaign. 

For vears the Protectionists have fooled 
themselves and the American public into 
believing that a high tariff upon goods 
manufactured in foreign countries means 
high wages and good conditions of the 
working people of this country. This be- 
lief has in the past been so general that 
it has almost been an article of faith with 
the American public and it might still re- 
main so. if the investigation recently made 
into the conditions of the workers in the 
most highly protected industries had not 
proven conclusively that, so far from be- 
ing benefited by the tariff, these workers 
are actually in a worse condition than any 
others in the country. 

And the reason is plain. While the 
goods manufactured at home are protected 
against goods made in foreign countries, 
the .American workman is compelled right 
at home to compete with the labor of 
Europe. In other words, while there is a 
high duty upon foreign goods, there is no 
duty upon foreign labor. Foreign goods 
can only pass into the country upon the 
payment of duty, but there is nothing to 
prevent the .\merican employer from draw- 
ing upon the four corners of the globe for 
the cheapest labor obtainable. Protection 
is the mother of monopoly. One follows 
the other. Whenever monopolies have 
have been organized, production has been 
cheapened, it is true, but the saving thus 
effected has gone into the pockets of the 
promoters, and the public has gained noth- 
ing. One of the simplest methods of 
cheapening production, of course, is reduc- 
ing wages and lengthening of the working 
hours. 

•\^'hen American workmen could not be 
prevailed upon to accept the reduction of- 
fered them, they were displaced by work- 
ers from Europe, and as soon as the new 
men began to complain, they were dis- 



placed by men of a still lower standard 
of living. Thus the tendency has been al- 
ways downward. If it were cheaper to 
train monkeys to do men's work, we might 
confidently expect to see them taking men's 
places. 

Look at the information laid before the 
Congressional committee which investi- 
gated the Lawrence strike ! The woolen 
manufacturers have for years boasted that 
they furnished employment to thousands 
of American workmen, yet there appeared 
before the committee men stating they were 
so poorly paid that they could not possi- 
bly spare the $4.00 fee for naturalization 
papers. 

IvOok at the conditions of the men in 
the Steel Trust mills in Pittsburg and 
Bethlehem ! Twelve hours' work per day. 
and in order to get a Sunday off every 
two weeks they are compelled to stand a 
2-l~hour shift. And wages actually below 
the living standard. 

() Protection, how man\- crimes have 
been committed in thy name 1 

It is not alone the working people who 
arc receiving the "benefit" from protec- 
tion. The public at large is complaining 
that the prices of the necessaries of life 
are soaring skyward, and that everything 
is going up, up, up. 

When inquiry is made as to the cause, 
the only answer is "passing the buck." If 
one asks the reason why the price of lum- 
ber is high, the dealer blames the whole- 
saler, the wholesaler the mill owner, the 
mill owner the man who owns the forest, 
and so on. In most cases, however, the 
dealer, the wholesaler, the mill owner and 
the owner of the forest is the same com- 
pany. 

It is a rather remarkable fact that while 
the American public has been educated 
into a faith in protection, the British peo- 
ple are equally strong for free trade. Here 
the slogan has been "no protection, small 
wages." there "high protection, small loaf." 
Who is right? 

American goods can be bought in most 
parts of Europe, freight paid, cheaper than 
in the home market. Where is the bene- 
fit to the American workman, when the 
goods he himself produces are sold cheaper 
in the foreign market than he himself can 
buy them? 

If we are to have protection, what is 
the matter with giving us one that will 
protect men as well as goods? Why not 
go at it like the people of Australia, whose 
protective tariff extends both to employer 
and worker? The former get the ad- 
vantage for their goods, the latter in the 
restriction placed upon immigration under 
which no one but persons eligible to citi- 
zenship are permitted to enter the country. 



The California State Federation of Labor, 
which meets at San Diego this week in 
Thirteenth Annual Convention, is without a 
doubt the most important gathering of or- 
ganized labor in California that has yet 
taken place. The maritime organizations of 
the Pacific Coast are represented in full and 
will present resolutions thanking the Federa- 
tion for assistance rendered in the past in 
behalf of legislatiofi making the Seamen — 
"Free Men." .Also again requesting the as- 
sistance of organized labor of California in 
having the Seamen's bill ( H. R. 23,673), 
now pending in Congress, enacted into law 
at the next session. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



ON THE CONTINENT. 



I have just returned from a six days' 
"tour" of the continent. In that time I 
have made the acquaintance of the police 
in three countries. I found it quite easy 
to make the acquaintance of the police on 
the continent. 

In company with Comrade Wilson I ar- 
rived at Hamburg- on the 12th. It was 
our purpose to address a meeting- of the 
members of the union. The notice of our 
arrival was too short to permit the local 
union officials to go through the forms 
prescribed by the police regulations in 
order to secure permission to hold a meet- 
ing. Under the circumstances to have held 
a meeting would have meant serious risks 
of a clash with the authorities. 

About fifty members were gathered in 
the back room of a saloon. Comrade 
Kramer, the secretary of the Hamburg 
branch, opened the "meeting" with a few 
words in German fin compliance with a 
requirement of the law), after which Com- 
rade AVilson and myself made brief talks. 

There was no applause, and the vote of 
thanks was given standing and in silence. 
Then the members walked out as though 
they had just been "having one." For the 
first time in my life I realized how it feels 
to be a "conspirator." It was quite a 
novel sensation, and very cheaply bought. 

We visited Antwerp on the l?th and ad- 
dressed a well-attended meeting, this time 
l)y permission of the police. Several mem- 
bers of the force were present, also a num- 
l)er of detectives. The chief of the detec- 
tives was good enough to assure us that 
he would not interfere so long as we didn't 
say anything — that is, anything against the 
Government or laws of Belgium. 

The meeting went along in good order. 
Comrade Damm, Continental District Sec- 
retary, presided. Comrade Wilson and 
myself made brief addresses. A vote of 
thanks to the speakers was then moved. 
So far, so good. 

Under the pretense of seconding the mo- 
tion a member of the Belgian seamen's 
union arose and proceeded to criticise the 
local authorities for their action in arrest- 
ing certain members of his organization. 
The speaker warmed to his theme and 
launched into an attack upon the law which 
prohibits "picketing and intimidation." 

At this point Comrade Wilson interposed 
an objection upon the ground that the 
speaker was not talking to the question, 
and further that the meeting, being com- 
posed of members of a British union, could 
not consistently discuss the laws of Bel- 
gium. 

The speaker agreed that the objection 
was well founded. He proceeded with his 
remarks, but before going very far he 
again attacked the local authorities. \A'ith- 
out further ado the chief of detectives ap- 
proached the speaker and ordered him to 
desist. Then he signaled to a policeman, 
who escorted him from the hall to the po- 
lice station. 

The motion was put and carried and the 
meeting then adjourned. 

On the following night a meeting was 
held at Rotterdam. Here everything went 
well until a boarding-master arose and, 
speaking in Dutch, began what sounded 
like a ferocious attack upon something", 
lie was cut short on general principles. 



It appears, however, that the speaker was 
merely handing a few bouquets to the local 
officials of the union ! Anyway it is diffi- 
cult to distinguish a bouquet from a brick- 
l)at when delivered in Dutch. 

The Netherlands Parliament opened at 
The Hague on the 17th. A half-hour's 
ride on an electric train brought us from 
Rotterdam to the capital. Great crowds 
were present in the old town to witness 
the ceremonies and catch a glimpse of the 
Queen and her consort, both of whom are 
very popular. 

The event of chief interest to us (Com- 
rades Wilson and Damm and myself) was 
the "demonstration" of 40,000 working 
men and women — trade-unionists. Social- 
ists, etc. — who had come from all parts of 
Holland to petition for laws extending the 
franchise and establishing an eight-hour 
day. 

The authorities had refused permission 
to parade or hold a meeting. However, a 
very large crowd assembled in the prin- 
cipal square of the town. We were in a 
hack, that mode of travel being more 
comfortable than hoofing it, and just as 
we turned into the square the order was 
given to "charge the mob." 

A body of mounted troopers with drawn 
swords dashed into the crowd, hitting right 
and left with the flat of their blades. They 
were ably seconded by the police, both 
foot and horse. 

Say, have you ever found yourself in 
the middle of,, a troop of cavalry on the 
charge?" Have you ever seen a dozen sa- 
bres flash before your eyes, each in the 
hands of a man who looked as though he 
might give you a clip just to show you 
that his weapon would cut? 

For a minute or two I thought of "home 
and mother." Then I looked around and 
found the square entirely deserted. The 
"mob" had been dispersed. The mere sug- 
gestion of a "whifT of grapeshot" had done 
the trick. 

During, the rest of the afternoon the 
would-be demonstrators tramped up and 
down the narrow streets singing "The 
Marseillaise." Everybody seemed to treat 
the matter in the light of a good joke. 

Evidently the "mobs" on the Continent 
are accustomed to being dispersed by 
troo])s. So far as I know, not a drop of 
blood was shed. Yet. how effective the 
whole proceeding was, considered merely 
as a demonstration ! 

The demonstration was a success in that 
it compelled the use of the military to dis- 
perse it. On the other hand, the use of 
the troops was effective in that it dis- 
persed the "mob" without sacrifice of life 
or limb. Still there were in the "riot" at 
The Hague all the elements of a first-class 
ruction that might have made the streets 
of the town run red. 

The ports of Hamburg, Rotterdam and 
Antwerp are full of life and bustle. The 
shipping trade is prosperous beyond prece- 
dent, and the spirit of unionism among the 
seamen of these ports is keen and wide- 
spread. Walter MACAUTiriiK. 

London, Sei)t. 19, 1912. 



Boots and shoes were imported inUi 
P.ritish India <iuring the last three fiscal 
years as follows: 1909-10, 1.527,680 pairs: 
1910-11, 1.790,8.^8 pairs; 1911-12, 2.31.5.503 
])airs. 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Hcachiuarters, Sai-i Francisco, Cai., Oct. 7, 1912. 

Regular -weekly meeting came to order at 7:30 
p. m., A. Knitzcner presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping fair. Hailoting for delegates to 
tlie Seattle convention of tiie International Sea- 
men's Union of America was proceeded with. 
ANDREW FURUSETH, Secretary. 

44-46 East St. Bell Phone Kearny 2228. 
Home Phone J 2228. 



Victoria. B. C, Sept. 30, 1912. 
Shipping fair; prospects good. 

ARCHIE KING, Agent. 
Old Court Room.s, Bastion Square. 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. .30, 1912. 
.Shipping fair. 

JOHN PEARSON, Agent. 
Labor Temple, cor. Homer and Dunsmuir. 
P. O. Box 1365. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 30, 1912. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping dull; pros- 
pects fair. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency. Sept. 28. 1912, 
.Shipping poor; prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Port Townsend Agency, Sept. 30, 1912. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping poor; 
prospects poor. 

WALTER MOLLER, Agent. 
229^ Water St. P. O. Box 48. Tel. 141 J. 



Alierdeen Agency, Sept. 30, 1912. 
Shipping dull; prospects uncertain. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 30, 1912. 
Shipping good, 

O. DTTTMAR, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2100. 51 Union Ave. Tel. East 
4912. 



Eureka Agency, Sept. 30. 1912. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping fair; pros- 
pects uncertain. 

JOHN W. ERICKSEN, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 553 R. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 28, 1912. 
Shipping good; prospects good, 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
P, O, Box 67, Tel, 137, L. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept, 24, 1912. 
Shipping good; prospect.s uncertain. 

CHAS. TAUCER, Agent. 
Cor. Oueen and Nuuami Sts. P, O, Box 314, 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, .Sa-n Francisco, Cat, Oct, 3, 1912, 
Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7 p, m,, Ed, Andersen in the clrair. Secretary 
reported shipping medium. Nominations of 
delegates to the International Convention and 
o'Yicers for the ensuing term were proceeded 
with. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary, 
Phone Kearny 5955, 



Seattle .\9;ency, Sept, 26, 1912, 
No meeting. Shipping slow, 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent, 
P. O. Box 1335. 1003 Western Ave. Phone 
Sun Main 2233. 



San I'edro Agency, Sept. 26, 1912, 
No meeting, Sliipi)ing and prospects fair; 
plenty of cooks ashore, 

HARRY POTHOFF, Agent, 
P. O. Box 54. 



Work has just begun cm the construction 
of three large edifices in the slum sections 
of Naples, which will accommodate about 
15,000 workingnuMi. This undertaking is 
imder the auspices of the Istituto Auto- 
nomo of Nai)les. These "case popul.^ri" 
will be conslructed at .\renaccia, Bog- 
gioreale, and at Fuorigrolta, which are 
places on the outskirts of the city limits 
]iopulatc(l entirely by people of rather im- 
l)overished circumstances, 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



*^^* 



ON THE GREAT LAKES. 



Contributed by the Lake Seamen's Union 



*^^^^ 



HELL-FARE CERTIFICATE CHANGE. 



Early one j'ear ago it was predicted in 
these columns that the enactment of the 
Seamen's Bill would force the Lake Car- 
riers' Association to abolish its "certifi- 
cate of recommendation," which that asso- 
ciation is forcing upon seamen in connec- 
tion with the notorious "welfare" scheme. 
Now it develops that the mere progress 
of the bill, without being enacted into law, 
has been sufficient to compel the Lake Car- 
riers to make some changes in preparation 
for the final abolition of the "certificate." 
The separate "welfare" (pronounced hell- 
fare) certificate has now been abolished, 
and instead each discharge book contains a 
small copy of it printed on the inside of 
the cover. It has been made as incon- 
spicuous as possible, so that it is now 
hardly noticeable. This is the first step 
towards its final abolition. After awhile it 
will just quietly disappear altogether. 

As further evidence of the Lake Car- 
riers' intention to abolish the "certificate," 
is the recent change in the make-up of the 
discharge books. Each book formerly con- 
tained a pocket or receptacle in which the 
large, elaborately engraved "certificate" 
was deposited. The new books now be- 
ing issued are made without such pocket. 

There are pertinent reasons for the 
changes. The Lake Carriers' Association 
fears it cannot prevent the passage of the 
Seamen's Bill, the enactment of which will 
result in the issuance of certificates of 
efficiency to able seamen by the United 
States government officials. Unless the 
Lake Carriers get rid of their own private 
"welfare certificate" scheme before the gov- 
ernment certificates are brought into use, 
they will find themselves in the position 
of attempting to claim that the authority 
of their shipping masters is greater than 
that of the United States. That would be 
the eflfect if they insist that men on their 
ships must hold documents issued by the 
shipping masters of the Association, in 
addition to the legal government certifi- 
cates. It would be like insisting that an 
act of the United States government must 
be O. K.'d by a scab shipping master be- 
fore it will be considered valid by the 
Lake Carriers' Association. The Lake Car- 
riers can not, of course, take any such 
stand. It would be utterly ridiculous, and 
might even endanger the very existence of 
the Association itself. Such arrogant de- 
fiance of the government might result in 
investigations of other acts of that cor- 
poration, and some violations of the anti- 
trust laws might be uncovered. 

The change in the construction of the 
discharge books, already referred to, has a 
greater significance than appears on the 
surface. The pocket in the books was re- 
moved for another reason than that con- 
nected with the Hell-fare certificate. It 
also has to do with the probable enact- 
ment of the Seamen's Bill. Sailors have 
the natural and orderly habit of keeping 
any papers relating to their employment 
in their books, and they would be very 
likely to use the discharge books, if, in- 
deed, any part of the Hell-fare plan sur- 



vives the passage of the expected law, as 
a convenient repository for the able sea- 
man certificates which will then be issued 
by the government. Each of such certifi- 
cates will be the legal property of the 
individual seaman to whom it was issued. 

Now the discharge books, which the 
Association compels the seamen to carry 
and pay for, and which are marked "Prop- 
erty of the Lake Carriers' Association," are 
subject to revocation at any time and by 
any ship's officer under the rules of the 
"welfare" blacklist scheme. In order to 
make the revocation of the books, and the 
consequent blacklisting, an easy and con- 
venient process, the seamen, under the rules 
of the "welfare plan" are required to de- 
posit the books with the ship's master. 
Thus that officer can "revoke" the book, 
and blacklist the seaman, by simply refus- 
ing to return it. He merely retains the 
"Property of the Lake Carriers' Associa- 
tion," which the corporation has author- 
ized him to do. 

But if the book should happen to contain 
a certificate of efficiency issued under au- 
thority of law, and which would then be 
the property of the seaman, the officer 
would find himself in an unpleasant posi- 
tion if he withheld such document from the 
sailor. The United States local inspectors, 
who issued the certificate and who also 
control the government license of the 
officer, would be compelled to take notice 
of such action. The sailor, too, might take 
a very justifiable notion to handle the per- 
son guilty of illegally withholding his cer- 
tificate, in exactly the same manner as he 
would an ordinary thief. 

The probabilities of the situation are a 

source of grave worry to "welfare plan" 

schemers. It seems impossible to avoid 

such occurrences without abolishing the 

Hell-fare book in its entirety. That is 

what will have to be done eventually. 

And the sooner the Lake Carriers accept 

the inevitable, the better it will be for 

themselves. \r \ r\ 

V. A. Olander. 



JOLTS BY JOSHUA. 



Call that "discharge book" a Hell-fare 
book. Never use the misleading name 
"welfare plan." The welfare connected 
with that book is for shipowners only, it 
is Hell-fare to seamen. 



The Seamen's Bill, now pending in the 
United States Senate, will benefit every 
seaman afloat if it is enacted into law. 
The non-union man will get as much good 
out of it as any one else. But to the union 
man will belong the credit for its success- 
ful passage. 



No seaman is ever ashamed of being a 
union man. The non-union man, however, 
usually tries to hide his own lack of affil- 
iations. He is never proud of being a non- 
unionist. There are reasons. The union 
man is self-assertive, he is fully alive, and 
tries to do things for himself and others. 
The non-unionist, at the very best, is in- 
active, too sluggish to exert himself even 



in self-defense, yet always glad to accept 
what others secure for him. 



One rope yarn will not hold the smallest 
skiff. But a hawser will hold the biggest 
ship. Yet a hawser is only many rope 
yarns laid together so that the strength 
of all is united. But the yarns must be 
close together for the hawser to have its 
full holding power. So it is with men. 
The shipowners can force seamen to ac- 
cept almost any terms if they can deal 
with the individuals separately. It is only 
when a large number of men hold together 
in a union that they can compel proper 
respect from employers. 



When horses on the plains are attacked 
by wolves they do not scatter and thus 
give the wolves an opportunity to tear 
them down one at a time. Instead they 
form a circle, with the powerful stallions 
on the outer rim, and when attacked they 
promptly let fly at the enemy with their 
strong hind legs. In other words, they get 
together and defend themselves and their 
own kind against the common enemy. 
Workingmen ought to practice more "horse 
sense" of the same character. 



The Lake Carriers claim that the non- 
union men are well satisfied with present 
conditions and do not desire any improve- 
ments. How do the Lake Carriers know 
this, and who gave them authority to 
speak for the men? Did the shipowners 
call a meeting of non-union men for the 
purpose of finding out what they want? 
Were the non-union men permitted to 
have a vote on the matter? Did the non- 
union men have anything to say about it 
at all? Not a word. The Lake Carriers 
propose to do the talking. The men must 
keep their mouths closed and let the ship- 
owners say what they please. Who will 
get the best of such an arrangement? 



The "Welfare Plan" amounts to just 
this: The Lake Carriers, grinning slyly 
among themselves, but smiling benevo- 
lently upon their victims, say: "Now be 
reasonable, you seamen. You don't know 
what is good for you. Let us, the ship- 
owners, attend to those things. Let us 
determine the laws to govern you. Let us 
set your wages as we see fit, determine the 
hours you must work, and select for you 
the food which you must eat. We know 
best. Do only what we tell you to do. 
Serve us in any way we demand. Come 
and go only with our permission. Give 
yourself over to us bodily, shut up and 
say nothing unless we tell you to. Submit 
to these things while you live, and as a 
reward we will give you a funeral when 
you die. Really and truly we will. That 
is, of course, provided you behave your- 
self and die on one of our ships." 



"It is sort of like a pass we had in 
slavery time. A slave could not go along 
without a pass in certain ways." Such 
was the comment made by Congressman 
C. L. Bartlett, while he listened to an ex- 



>^ 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



planation of the Lake Carriers' "welfare 
plan" during the hearings of the Commit- 
tee on Investigation of the United States 
Steel Corporation. Congressman Bartlett 
is a Southerner, familiar with conditions in 
the South before the war, and he instantly 
recognized the slave provisions of the no- 
torious Hell-fare scheme. The shipowners 
of the North are trying to fasten upon the 
white seamen a system almost identical 
with that formerly used on the negro slave 
of the South. There is, however, a great 
difference between the Lake Carrier of to- 
day and the slave-owner of bygone years. 
In the South the white man held the negro 
in bondage. Surely that was bad enough. 
But the Lake Carriers to-day recognize no 
distinction of either race or color. They 
seek to enslave their own race. 

Joshua Blunt. 



THE AGITATOR. 



What is an agitator? 

Ever stop to give thought to it? 

An agitator you will say is one who 
agitates. 

To agitate, as defined by the best lexico- 
graphers, is to move or urge; to discuss; 
to excite public interest, and half a dozen 
other equally applicable definitions. 

Yet none of these many definitions, to 
my mind, gives a nice explanation of the 
popular use of this much abused word. 

When John the Baptist took to crying 
in the wilderness, for instance, his pur- 
pose was not to excite or move the people 
of Judea, but more correctly to warn ! — 
there is another definition for you — to warn 
of an approaching something. And John, 
I dare say, was as true an agitator as ever, 
in more recent times, mounted a soap box. 

Then there is Jesus, son of a carpenter 
in Nazareth; His mission was not to ex- 
cite the people, nor urge, nor move them, 
but to put before them an entirely new 
idea, a new thought, as a matter of hon- 
est fact, to awaken them to their depraved 
condition, and also, as in the case of John, 
to warn ! 

Here, then, we have another definition, 
namely, to awaken the people to their own 
depraved condition. This later definition 
of the word I like better than any other. 

You will notice I have chosen to illus- 
trate my point, two of the greatest agita- 
tors that history records. There are hosts 
of others known and unknown whose men- 
tion could avail me little here. In each 
case I think you will find that their pur- 
pose was to get in among the people and 
compel them by virtue of constant and 
persistent reiteration, to take note of their 
depraved conditions, which, in each in- 
stance, having grown upon them gradually, 
almost insidiously, had sprung up about 
them entirely unnoticed. 

And then, having pointed out these fla- 
grant, though unapparent truths — to 
strengthen the people — to induce them to 
revolt against their depraved conditions — 
this is to agitate, and to do all this is to 
be an agitator. 

But- 
Having accomplished somewhat of this, 
you find yourself suddenly and strangely 
enough become an enemy to society! 
Think of it!— an enemy of all mankind, 
like a volcano, an earthquake, or a me- 
teorite! An agitator has a thankless job, 
I warrant you, for lo and behold! he is 



hated and despised all around, ofttimes 
stoned to death or crucified. Those whom 
he endeavors to help despise him on gen- 
eral principles, or possibly because they 
know no better; those against whom he is 
in revolt hate him, as they rightfully 
should. 

He is the social bug-a-boo — the "bad 
man" of society! 

Only once can I say I have seen him 
tendered anything approaching respect, and 
that was by a writer on the condition of 
labor in the Philippines. I shall quote him. 
He says in part: 

"The general conclusions may be drawn 
with respect to labor in these islands that 
the efficiency increases with proper train- 
ing (and with it the amount of produce) 
faster than the rate of wages. (See the 
point?) This makes the outlook (for the 
capitalist), with a liberal supply of raw 
material to draw upon, very promising 
(indeed!), provided that the (admittedly 
underpaid) people are not misled" (?) by — 
what do you suppose? 

By "agitators," of course ! 

Think how joyfully and light of heart the 
playful capitalist could gambol in the ver- 
dant islands of the Philippines if the agi- 
tator; if the hideous, slimy "mad dog of 
society" could only be "silenced" forever! 

But enough of this. 

Let us return to our work of defining. 

I concluded heretofore that an agitator 
was one who gets in among the people 
and awakens them to their depraved con- 
dition. 

One word more. 

Did you ever hear of an agitator among 
the rich and gouty? No? Always seems 
to get among the "poor and lowly," 
doesn't he? 

Very well, then, suppose we say: One 
who gets among the poor and lowly, and 
awakens them to their depraved condi- 
tion — 

He is an agitator. — Jesse Fales in New 
York Call. 



NOTICE TO SEAMEN. 



IMPORTANT. 



An investigation into the housing of the 
working classes in the city of Buenos 
Aires has just been concluded. From the 
document the following points are taken: 
The 400 workingmen consulted resided in 
the four industrial centers of the city. 
The average wage is $4 paper (paper peso 
equals 42.46 cents United States currency) 
per working day, the average rent $28.25 
per month. In regard to the accommoda- 
tion, it is found that 341 of the total num- 
ber of workmen consulted live each in a 
single room, 39 occupy two rooms each, 
14 three rooms, and 6 four rooms. In the 
Boca, 62 workmen live in 72 rooms, 5 
rooms having only a door for air and light, 
.S8 have a door and a window each, and 
2 have two windows and a door. The 
Boca is the center where wages are high- 
est, rents lowest, space cheapest, and 
Ijuildings most primitive. Of the 400 men, 
308 are married, 88 are bachelors, and 4 
widowers. The children of the married 
men are 869 in number. In the 452 rooms 
examined, no less than 1,269 persons re- 
side, the average being 2.8 persons per 
room. The hygienic conditions are : 163 
rooms good, 116 fair, and 121 bad. The 
report is regarded as proof that the condi- 
tions of life among the working classes 
in Buenos Aires are far from being satis- 
factory. 



Any seaman who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above sta- 
ted reasons, or because of rules of the so- 
called "Welfare Plan," by any agent or 
representative of the Lake Carriers' Asso- 
ciation or any of its allied concerns, in- 
cluding the masters and officers of the 
ships. Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 
V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Joseph Orlick, last heard of on steamer 
Santa Marie, in 1908, is inquired for by 
Carl Stocket, 71 Main street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Ed Jordan, No. 10415, L. S. U., is inquired 
for by his sister, Mrs. Raynor, 319 Caroline 
Street South, Hamilton. Any one knowing 
his whereabouts please notify the above ad- 
dress. 



LAKE DISTRICT, I. S. U. of A. 

HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

570 West Lake Street, Chicago, III. 
BRANCHES AND AGENCIES. 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND. 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, 21 High Street 

Telephone 552. 

TOLEDO, OHIO 54 Main Street 

Telephone Bell East 756. 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbrldge Street, East 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone, New, Broad 385. 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y . . 70 Isabella Street 

CONNEAUT, 992 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 

HEADQUARTERS. 
71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone Seneca 48. 

BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 445 LaSalle Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbrldge Street, East 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1814 Fourth Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 
HEADQUARTERS. 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 2295. 
BRANCHES. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 314 N. Clark Street 

ASHTABULA, 74 Bridge Street 

TOLEDO, 54 Main Street 

DETROIT, MICH 7 East Woodbrldge Street 

PORT HURON, MICH 617 Water Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 162 Main Street 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

BAY CITY. MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 
MARINE HOSPITALS. 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 
RELIEF STATIONS. 

Ashland, Wis. Ogdensburg, N. Y. 

Ashtabula Harbor, O. Oswego, N. Y. 

Buffalo, N. Y. Port Huron, Mich. 

Duluth, Minn. Manitowoc, Wis. 

Escanaba, Mich. Marquette, Mich. 

Grand Haven, Mich. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Green Bay, Mich. Saginaw, Mich. 

Hoi'.'-.Iiton, Mich. Sandusky, O. 

I^udlngton, Mich. Sault Ste. Marie. Mich 

Manistee, Mich. Sheboygan, Wis. 

Erie, Pa. Superior, Wis. 

Menominee, Mich. Toledo. O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



PRUSSIA'S PARLIAMENT. 



Six Siicialist representatives have success- 
fully cried "Haiu!s up!" to Prussia's Parlia- 
nieiit. It is. a stirring sight. .Against 437 of 
the nation's mandatories, all fierce enemies of 
Socialism, stand sijc insignificant, poorly clad, 
unimposing little men, vowed only to ob- 
struct and worry; and the victory is with, 
these six. Not since Joseph Biggar and 
Charles Stewart Parnell ran their obstruction 
campaign in England's Parliament have such 
events been seen. 

Shorthand reports teem with ■■interrui> 
tiyns," "exclamations," cries of "get out," 
"begone," derisive "hear, hears!" hisses and 
boohs. .\nd the brave 457 have been so ir- 
ritated, stung and baffled by their mobile, 
hornet-like tormentors that they have been 
obliged to put into motion tlie ordinary crim- 
inal law, and all Germany awaits the result 
of this unprecented action. 

That happened as the result of a debate 
on the Polish land settlement law. when ob- 
structor No. I. Herr Borchardt. was dragged 
out of the sessions hall by policemen. Herr 
P.orchardt stood close to the president's 
table and bawled out rude remarks. His col- 
league, obstructor No. 2, Herr Leinert, who 
sits beside him, refused to get out of the way 
when the police appeared and had to be 
"led out." 

In any other Parliament an incident like 
this would have been forgotten next day. 
Ihit the 437 anti-Sociali.st members of Prus- 
sia's Parliament are so convinced of the hel])- 
lessness of parliamentary discipline that they 
decided to invoke tlic criminal law. Speaker 
Piaron von ErfFa lodged a criminal informa- 
tion against IJorchardt for "breach of the 
peace in the House." And the Government 
is solemnly prosecuting Porchardt on this 
charge ; and further, charging him and Herr 
I.einert with "resisting the power of the 
State." The two Deputies are delighted. 
And so are others. After a report appeared 
in the press that P.orchardt and I.einert's 
waistcoats had been torn in the struggle. 
there arrived at the Parliament door six new 
and gorgeous waistcoats, embroidered by 
women's hands, to be denned by the bandit 
six, who declare they are fighting for Prus- 
sian liberty against the unholy 437. 

That is how Socialists sec it. They are 
obliged, they say, to offend, flout and irritate 
Prussia's Parliament, l)ecause that is their 
only resource. Like Italy in her dealings 
with Turkey, they conclude that they can 
effect nothing big and dramatic, and resort 
to pin-pricks because it is necessary to do 
something and because in the meantime some- 
thing may turn up. Hence the "get-outs," 
"be.gones," hisses and boohs. In order to 
justify their action in asking aid fnmi the 
|>olice the 437 have published a list of inter- 
ruptions as shown by the official reports. 
The list showed that during a period when 
017 interruptions came from the 437, the 
bold, bad six interrupted or interjaculated 
2272 times. Which shows that the 437 could 
manage only two interruptions per head, 
while, the outlaw six each managed to get 
in 400. 

Deputies l.iebknccht, Hirsch, .Stroebel, 
I loffman, Leinert and Horchardt are the six. 
Their main strength lies in their smallness of 
numbers. Did they number 60 no man 
would heed them. Rut the colossal fertility 
of their obstructivencss and rudeness strikes 
the Prussian imagination. The best-known 
i.mong them is D/. Karl Liebknecht. He i- 



a 41 -year-old lawyer, son of the still more 
famous Wilhelm Liebknecht. Socialist, revo- 
lutionary and exile, who was sent to jail with 
.\ugust Rebel for the crime of high treason. 
Wilhelm Liebknecht was the man who gave 
German Socialist its internationalist and anti- 
Prussian color. His son is a competent 
speaker, a member of the Prussian Parlia- 
ment, of the Reichstag,of the Berlin munici- 
pality and of the new "Greater Pjerlin" Coun- 
cil, so that he sits in four assemblies, and 
therefore holds a record among German 
]iublic men. 

Leibknecht, the younger, has a stormy 
past. He has repeatedly been prosecuted ami 
l)unished. Like his father, he has sat in jail 
for high treason. This was in 1")07. The 
charge was based on his book, "Militarism 
and ,\nti-Militarism, With Special Regard 
to the Youths' Movement." In this the Gov- 
ernirent saw a plot to change the Constitu- 
tion by force, the first step to be the aboli- 
tion of the standing army. Liebknecht spent 
his term of imprisonment in Glatz fortress, 
where now languishes an English spy. Last 
January he avenged himself by capturing 
for Socialism the Kai.ser's pet constituency — 
Potsdam-Spandau. The court interest fierce- 
ly o])posed this red interruption, and a con- 
servative newspaper even proclaimed that if 
Liebknecht was elected. Kaiser Wilhelm 
would shut up his Potsdam palace and mi- 
grate elsewhere. Liebknecht's victory was 
comi)lete, but the Kaiser stays on. 

Liebknecht is the only Deputy of the six 
whose name is widely known to the German 
public. The ablest of his colleagues is Dep- 
uty Paul Hirsch, a 43-year-old sociologist 
and journalist. He is a good authority on 
social diseases and on land and communal 
legi.slation. The other four — Herron Stroe- 
bel, Hoffmann, Leinert and P.orchardt — are 
good fighting parliamentarians and brilliant 
intcrruptors, but their only claim to be con- 
sidered statesmen is their talent for ])ro- 
voking .scenes. 

Sympathizers with Socialism justify the 
tactics of the bandit six, declaring that no 
self-respecting man would do anything in 
Prussia's Parliament except make scenes. 
The Prussian Legislature is the most back- 
ward and reactionary in Europe. The fran- 
chise is based upon a decree of 1849, issued 
the year after the Revolution. It gives no 
chance whatever to democratic representa- 
tion. Under the franchise law the electors 
in each constituency are divided into three 
classes, according to the amount of direct 
taxes they pay. .\ handful of rich men in 
tlic first class count for as much as several 
hundred men of moderate income in the 
■■econd class, and as several thousand vvork- 
ingmen in the third class. There is a Berlin 
electoral district where the "first class of 
voters" consists of a single rich brewer: tiie 
second class of this brewer's relatives, and 
the third class of 1785 men, mostly employes 
of the brewery. The brewer and his rela- 
tives, under the present .sy.stem, outvote the 
178.5 employes. 

.Another reactionary feature is the open 
ballot. .\ rigid control over the voting is 
kept by the officials known as "rural coun- 
cilors," and also by the big local land own- 
ers : and officials and agricultural ' laborers 
are pr.iciically forced to vote Conservative. 
Only in a few ' towns have the democratic 
parties a chance. Hence Prussia's Parlia- 
ment is essentially noble and agrarian. .Al- 
though Pru.ssia is predominantly an indus- 
trial and commercial State, the Parliament 



LABOR'S ECONOMIC PLATPORM. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the .-Xmerican Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

U. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted into 
law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of United States Gov- 
ernment Postal Savings Banks. 

INTERNATIONAL SEAMEIM'S UNION 
Of AMERICA. 

(Continued from Page 5.) 



I 



suf- 



fer 



the 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. 91 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash.. 140SV4 Western Ave., P. O. Box 
875. 

rORTLANO, Ore.. 101 N. Front St. 

S.\N PEPRO, Cal., 123 Fifth St., P. O. Box 674. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO. Cal.. 51 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash.. 209-210 Powell Building, P. O 
Box 1335. 
SAN PEDRO, Cal.. P. O. Box B4. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

ASTORIA. Ore.. P. O. Box 138. 

Branches: 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

LA CONNER. Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN, Wash.. P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION, 
OKOHGETOWN, Wash 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER, Ore. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 

KETCHIKAN. 
LORING, Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBURG. Alaska. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 93 Steuart St. 

Agencies: 
SE.A.TTLE. Wash., 84 Seneca St.. P. O. Box 42. 
.^STORI.'V. Ore.. P. O. Box 138. 



The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can he procured by seamen at 
any of (he above-mentioned places: 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASIA 

29 ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. S. W, 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



contains only ten merchants, whereas it con- 
tains 139 large land owners and about 120 
other members who are in some way con- 
nected with the land. The big owners of 
land in Prussia number about 20,000, and 
with their families probably count 100,000 
souls. The interests of these 100,000 are 
represented to the exclusion of the interests 
of the other 40,000,000. Bismarck, though 
himself a tough Conservative, admitted that 
the Prussian franchise was an "abortion" ; 
and the bandit six, when fighting for fran- 
chise reform, think they need not be more 
mealy-mouthed than was the Iron Chancel- 
lor. ' 

Socialist exasperation on the franchise 
c|uestion is inflamed by the fact that in the 
Parliaments of other German States they 
have attained strong positions. In the Saxon 
Landtag sit 25 Socialist members ; in the 
Bavarian, 21, and in the Wurttemberg, 10. 
Altogether in German State Parliaments sit 
180 Social Democrats; and there are 7533 
Socialist members of municipal councils. 
Alone the Prussian Parliament remains 
closed. The most striking contrast is with 
the Imperial Reichstag. There the Socialists 
had one member in 1871 ; and now they have 
110. The number of their voters has risen 
from 102,000 to 4,000,000. Since 1906 the 
registered strength of the Sociali.st party 
doubled, from 384,000 to 720,000. At every 
Legislature door Socialists knock with suc- 
cess ; but six is their high-water mark in the 
most important of German State Parlia- 
ments ; and under the present franchise they 
can not get any more. 

Prussia's "Herrenhaus," the Mouse of 
Lords, is of even more reactionary character 
than the lower house. In composition it is 
nearly as medieval as is the British House of 
Lords, and its power is much greater. Of 
316 sitting members 76 arc hereditary, 87 are 
representatives of entailed landed estates, 58 
are appointed by the Kaiser as King of Prus- 
sia ; and only the 48 represent the town in- 
terest. Bismarck, Treitsche and many other 
sound Conservatives admitted the worthless- 
ncss of the Prussian House of Lords, and 
saw the need for radical reforms. But neither 
the upper nor the lower Prussian house can 
be reformed without its own consent. That 
is why the Socialist six hold the arg^iment 
is useless, and that the most eflfective weapon 
is the interruption, the hiss and the boo. 

Prussian conservatism, as represented in 
the two houses, is a great deal more power- 
ful than even Kaiser Wilhelm himself. 

In other words, absolutism is to be sup- 
ported as long as the Kaiser is conservative ; 
but if the Kaiser moves for reform his auto- 
cratic wings are to be clipped. That policy 
b.as so far prevented the reform of the fran- 
chise. In his 1908 speech from the throne. 
Kaiser Wilhelm undertook the reform, which 
he described as "one of the most pressing 
problems of the day." Prince Buelow was 
then responsible Chancellor and president of 
the Prussian Cabinet. The dominant Con- 
servatives resolved to give Buelow a lesson. 
They took occasion of the financial reform 
of 1909 to combine with the Centre, and 
forced him from office. 

A year later Bethmann-I hjllwcg intnj- 
duced a reform bill. The Parliament cut it 
to bits and sent it to the House of Lords, 
which mutilated it still more. When the bill 
came back the lower house started cho])ping 
it up again, and, foiletl, Pjethmann-IIollweg 
withdrew it in disgust. The Government has 
since then not had the courage to bring in a 



new bill. And as long as the Parliament re- 
mains obdurate it can be reformed only by 
means of a coup d'etat. But Wilhelm II is 
not inclined to make a coup d'etat which 
would benefit the hated Socialists most of all. 
So the Socialists — six of them — will con- 
tinue to obstruct. Criminal prosecutions will 
not dishearten them. The 437, they reason, 
soon will get tired, and ultimately, they hope, 
they will be able to reform the franchise and 
let a few score of Social Democrats in. But 
before that day dawns many million boos, 
hisses, exclamations and shouts of "Get out!" 
will adorn the official reports of Prussia's 
Legfislature. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



Rubber Workers of Peru. 
The State Department has sent a rep- 
resentative up the Amazon River country 
to secure definite information relative to 
the native rubber gatherers in Peru. Rep- 
resentations to the department are to the 
efifect that a repetition of the horrors of 
the Congo rubber industry are being per- 
petrated in the Amazon country. Natives 
are forced by torture and mutiliations to 
collect a maximum quantity of rubber each 
day. 

Sir Roger Casement, Consul-General of 
Great Britain, makes a most startling re- 
port concerning the situation, and in it 
he says : "The rubber industry in the 
forests of the Amazon is an appalling reve- 
lation of crime, lust, and cruelty. The 
vilest tortures which could be conceived by 
the most depraved mind have been prac- 
ticed upon the wretched slaves who gather 
rubber. Civilization stands self-condemned 
if it permits these conditions to exist — even 
in darkest South America." 

Failing joint action by the powers, .some 
country must take action alone. If Ger- 
many in her desire for colonial expansion 
should turn her eyes in this direction, who 
of those who stand aside dare say her nay? 
Probably it is this last expression by the 
Consul-General which has influenced our 
State Department to make an investigation 
before European countries intervene. 



A Tangled Situation. 

As an example of peculiar legislation, 
which frequently finds its way into ap- 
propriation bills while they are in confer- 
ence between the two Houses of Congress, 
the so-called newspaper publicity provision 
of the new postoffice appropriation bill is 
one in point. The officials of the Post- 
office Department have been trying to de- 
vise a scheme to make the law workable, 
but have been unable to satisfy themselves 
and have put the question up to the Attor- 
ney General. There are 28,144 newspapers 
and periodicals enjoying the second class 
rate privilege, and one publisher directs 
attention to the fact that the law denies 
mail i)rivileges to any newspaper or peri- 
odical which fails to answer a string of 
questions about the circulation, ownership, 
management, and other things. This pub- 
lisher wants to know whether a person in- 
closing such information in a sealed en- 
velope and mailing it in the first-class mail 
will be violating the law. The department 
answered to the efifect that it supposed it 
would. Again the question of book re- 
views and passes to theaters has been 



raised in connection with the requirement 
that all editorials and reading matter shall 
be plainly marked "Advertising," for the 
publication of which "money or other val- 
uable consideration is paid, accepted or 
promised." The department replied that 
if a notice were published in consideration 
of anything of value it would come within 
the meaning of the law. The Attorney 
General will be called upon to answer the 
question of a publisher who wants to know 
whether a theatrical criticism published by 
a paper which has accepted a pass to the 
theater is a violation of the law. It is 
believed that should the law be strictly 
complied with most of the papers through- 
out the country will have to go out of 
business. For instance, reading notices 
printed in consideration for the giving of 
an advertisement or in connection with 
business orders accepted by a printing 
plant must be marked plainly "Advertise- 
ment" under the law. Officials of the Post- 
office Department are inclined to think that 
this is a serious infringement on the free- 
dom of the press, and they are also dubious 
about the right of Congress to interfere 
with copies of newspapers which do not 
enter the mails at all, as in the case of 
the big city dailies. There are many an- 
gles of the law which, if strictly enforced, 
would make it almost impossible for pub- 
lications to continue. No doubt this sub- 
ject will be taken up at the next session 
of Congress and the defects remedied. 



Size of New Currency. 

The size of the new currency in contem- 
plation by the Treasury Department will 
be reduced approximately one-third. If the 
present plans are carried out this new 
sized currency will take the place of all 
currency now in circulation. The intended 
size is exactly that of the Spanish peso. 
Currency is printed in the Bureau of En- 
graving and Printing by the plate printers. 
The law in reference to the printing of cur- 
rency requires that money be printed from 
"four-subject" plates. By the reduction 
in size of the currency there is sufficient 
room for an additional subject on the pres- 
ent size plates. The question now arises 
as to whether there is going to be the 
same protection against counterfeiting in 
the smaller note as there is in that of the 
present size. The reduction in the size of 
the note makes it more difficult to produce 
an engraving which will defy counterfeit- 
ing as well as the larger note. It is stated 
that the designs for the smaller notes have 
been greatly simplified, materially reduc- 
ing the size of the portraits used. Experts 
in detecting spurious currency claim that 
the larger the size of these portraits, the 
more difficult it is to counterfeit, thus it 
will be seen that with the reduction in the 
size of the portraits greater opportunities 
are to be presented for the use of spurious 
notes. It will be remembered that pro- 
vision has already been made to use power 
presses in the Bureau of Engraving and 
Printing, and with the introduction of 
smaller currency, there seems to be a 
question as to whether the volume of busi- 
ness, which naturally increases with the 
growth of the country, will be sufficient to 
maintain the present force employed in 
the Bureau. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases! 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Labor News. 



The Texas State Council of Car- 
penters is working on a plan to build 
a home for the indigent and disabled 
carpenters of the State. In a recent 
issue of the Texas Carpenter a half- 
tone of the proposed building is 
printed. If the plans are carried out 
the carpenters of the State will 
eventually have a magnificent build- 
ing, which will be a credit to the 
ability and progressiveness of the 
Texas carpenters. 

Complaints from men arriving at 
San Francisco who have been em- 
ployed in the Alaska canneries that 
a fee for securing positions for them 
was being held out of their wages 
by the labor contractors who supply 
the men of the canneries, started an 
investigation by the Labor Commis- 
sioner which has resulted in the ar- 
rest of one of the contractors and 
forced another to return the fee 
taken from a laborer's wages. 

The locals of the Ijiternational 
Longshoremen's Association, repre- 
senting the Longshoremen of Aber- 
deen and Hoquiam, have accepted the 
terms offered by the Gray's Harbor 
Stevedore Company, and have re- 
turned to work after a bitter strug- 
gle. It was agreed that the Long- 
shoremen would be paid for over- 
time at the rate of time and a half 
from S p. m. until 7 a. m. The 
wages for the regular time are to be 
50 cents per hour. 

President Gompers, Vice-President 
Michell and Secretary Morrison of 
the American Federation of Labor 
have been granted until November 1 
to complete their appeal to the Dis- 
trict Appellate Court from their con- 
viction of alleged contempt of court 
by Judge Daniel T. Wright. The 
cases will not be argued until next 
February. . Mr. Gompers was sen- 
tenced to a year in jail, Mr. Mitchell 
to nine months and Mr. Morrison to 
six months. 

The union street carmen of Joplin, 
Mo., have won a complete victory 
and perhaps the greatest ever won in 
the Joplin-Pittsburg mining district. 
Some time ago 200 motormen, con- 
ductors and barnmen, comprising the 
entire operating force of the Joplin 
and Pittsburg Railways Company, 
went on strike. The trouble arose 
over the discharge of one of the em- 
ployes, and upon the company rein- 
stating' the discharged employe the 
men returned to work. 

Oscar S. Straus, chairman, of the 
arbitration board which has under 
consideration the demands of the en- 
gineers of fifty railroads for more 
pay and better working conditions, 
has resigned, and his resignation has 
been accepted by the board. Dr. 
Charles R. Van Hise, President of 
the University of Wisconsin, was 
elected to fill the vacancy. The resig- 
nation was due to the fact that Mr. 
Straus has received the nomination 
for Governor of New York on the 
Progressive ticket. 

A national conference of mine 
managers, superintendents, company 
surgeons, and first aid experts called 
by the • United States Bureau ■ of 
Mines met at the Government ex- 
periment station in Pittsburg, Pa., on 
September 23. The bureau reports 
a decrease of 300 in the yearly death 
list from mine explosions during 
1911. This is believed to be due to 
the active work of the bureau, which 
has encouraged at least 1,000 mining 
companies to include rescue stations 
in their equipment. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



School Phone Ind. A 4484 



Residence Phone Ind. Green 185 

MARSHALL'S 
Navigation School 



Day and Night 
REASONABLE TERMS 
204 Grand Trunk Pacific Dock 



SEATTLE 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Connpany 
UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 
615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



Headquarters For 

Union Made Clothing 

FURNISHINGS, HATS AND SHOES 

At 

WESTERMAN & SCHERMER 

220 and 222 First Avenue, South 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



Bonney-Watson Co. 

UNDERTAKERS 
3rd and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 
Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or 
telegraph promptly attended to 
Phone, Main 13 
Independent: Elliott 254 



ALASKA HOTEL 

Corner Western and Seneca 

The newest 25-cent house in town. 

New building, new furniture. 

Special attention to mariners. 

FREE BATHS 

Special Weekly Rates 

PETER DESMORE, Proprietor. 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce. letters addressed in care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not he held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to call 
or have their mall forwarded during that 
period, they should notify the Agent to 
hold ni.ail until arrival. 



Aagaard, A. 

Abrahamsen, Jo- 
hannes 

Adalfsen, Oscar 

Andresen, Ingvald 

Anderson, Sam 

Anderson, Halgar 
Thorne 

.Anderson, Otto 

Aronspn. Halfdan 

Alonzo, I. 

.AndarBon, Hjalmar 

.Anderson, Fred 

Baushaok, E. 

Baam. R. 

Rakker. Hakow 

Rlair> Frank 

Boison . .Torgen 

Boax. Henrik 

Burgess, M. 

Bonedixon, Nick 

Berontsen, Alfred 

Blommendal, J. 

Bnyd. .John 

rniighlan. C. 

Chri.'iten.'sen. H. T. 

Cotton. John 

nirkenson, T>. 

Ponellv. J. H. 

T>avidsr>n. .Takob 

n^nnett. .Tohn 

KlstPd. John 

Krlandes. T.oiiis 

K'khardt. Charley 

■Rrik.son. Kdvard 

T^ick. John 

Fielsted. K. M. 

l^'redriksen. Berger 

Frammes. Ivar 

Oehler. F. 

C.ufidcrsen. I... S. 

Cibbons. J. 

Oinis. G. 

Wansen. H. O. 

TTansen. Nels S. 

ITaknnsen. Ingvar 

TTansen. Simon 

Hnudt, W. 

TT.Tltnops. M. 

Hea-g, Martin 

Holm. H. P. 

Hall, G. A. 

Tversen, Arthur 

Tve-ssen, I. 

JaroKson. A. John 

Jaoobson. Johan 

Jacobpon. .T. Martin 

Jensen. .Tohn G. 

.Tonsen. .Taoob -419 

Jrnsen. Hans 

.Tensen. .Tohn 

.To''an.'ion, H. Tobias 

Johnson. TTenry 

Tobnson. Cusf 

Johnson, C. TT. 

Johnson. C. J. -150fi 

•Tobnson. .Anrlrew 

.Tohanson. Kinar 

■Tohnnsen. .\ug. W. 

.Tonsen. P 

Tobanson. O. K. 

T^aiser. Tl. 

Kerr. .Andrfw 

T^-ermagorah. A, 

Kopatz, C. 



Kneblikoff. I. 

I..acey. Thos. 

I<arson, 

T.arsen, 

I^arsen, 

I.,arsen, 

I.«arson. 

I.,arsen, 

T.athi. 



E. 

Anton 

Peter 

Axel 

Henry 

Eric J. 

P. O. 
T. H. 
T^ind. .John 
Tjipvens. John 
T.indgren. T^. 
T^iiby. W. 
Tjiidwig, .Tack 
T^nrson. E. G. 
T,orln. A. I-. 
T,eo. C. 

M.artinsen. C. M. 
Mattson. Olaf 
M.ibe. J. 

Martinsen. Inevald 
Maatson. Olaf 
Manlers. C. 
Magnnsen. T.,ars 
Mpisland. TTans 
Moller. J. B. 
Miiir. James 
Miller, .Tames 
Mnrx. Thnrvald 
Mnit.Tk. W. 
McPliPrson. .Tames 
MrCormack, .T. 
Mf'TCoown. Thos. 
MrTCittrick. J. 
Mikelsen. Peter 
MikkPlsen. K. -1620 
Nelson. Birger 
Nielsen. H. .1. 
Nflson. A. -902 
Nilsen. Jack 
Nikander. A. E. 
Nolan. .T:inies 
Noshis, C. 
Nilson, .Mfins 
Nelson, Adolf 
Oberg, Oscar 
Oberhauspr. .Tohn 
Ohlson. Ben 
Olssen. Charles 
Olsen, Oust 
Olson. Hans P. 
Olsen. Trygue I^. 
Olsen. Anton 
Otto. W. 
Owens, J. H. 
Oehmlchen. Fred 
Olsen. Nick 
Olsen. Edvin 
Pederson. .Alfred 
Person. Charlev 
Plant. Billie 
Primmer. .A'ex 
Pederson. John 
Powell. Giis 
Rasmussen. R. -525 
Rpinink. TT. 
Rospnwald. T. 
Ratpliffp, T-. 
Sack. J. -242S 
Saloncn, .Tohn 
Straus, W. 
Strand, Chas. 
Swenson. B. -1932 
Stem. T. C. 
Steen, Jens 



Seattle Navigation School 




Open the entire year, 
and in touch with 
latest requirements. 
Candidates thoroughly 
prepared for License 
of any grade; Master, 
Mate or Pilot; Ocean, 
Coast or Inland, 



By CAPT. W. J. SMITH, 
Nautical Expert, 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical Collegre, 
Licensed Master of Ocean steam and 
sail vessels (unlimited), and Master 
and Pilot for Inland waters. Author of 
"Self-Instructor in Navigation," Author 
of "Practical Compass Adjustment." 
Compass Adjuster. 

507 MARITIME BUILDING 
911 Western Ave,, SEATTLE, Wash. 

Phones: 
School, Main 3300. Res. Queen Anne 664 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St. 

Seattle, Wash. 



Vernon W. Buck Arthur C. McLane 

Carl G. Benson 

BUCK, BENSON & McLANE, 

Lawyers and Proctors In Admiralty 

Free Advice to Seamen. 

1265 Empire Building, 

Seattle, Wash. 

Vi tala og skrifva de nordiska spraag. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer in 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squlre-Latlmer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



Tamke, Alfred 
Taylor, Ed. 
Tangeros, Ole 
Thompson, Anton 
Thorspn, Torger 
Tessner, R. 
Wartnau, W. 
\^'erner. J. 
Wedeking, W. 
Winzens. G. 



Zetkel, W. 
Zimmer, W. 

Registered Letter. 
Krager, F. 

Packages. 
Borjensen, C. A. 
Miller. L. 
Nilsen. I. J. 
F'etersen, M. 
Zeckel. W. 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Anderson, Erlck 

B. 
Androlio, A. 
Anderson, Otto 
Abrams, Geo. 
Buckmer, — 
Brodig, — 
Balda. Alfonso 
Bergstrom. Paul 
Brodig, W. G. 
Blakstad. Charles 
Corty, C. 
Cordia, Peter 
Christensen, Peter 

C. 
Colnian, E. 
Dennis, Charles 
Dorff. William 
Degroot. George 
Erickson, L. 
Eugene, John 
Knglund, E. H. 
Rngstrom, M. R. 
Frederiikson. H. E. 
Fristrom, Ivar 
Gegory, Jas. 
Grove. Al 
Gallcberg. Martin 
Glaas. Waldemar 
Glannus, Alex. 
Heinas. Charles 
Hellsten, Gus 
Hultmsui, A. 
Haga, John A. 
Irwin, Robert 
.laase, Warren 
.Tobnson, Jack 
Johnson, George 
Johnson, Chris 
Johnsen, Haivor J. 
Johnsen. Ole 
•Tohnsen, John 
Jensen, Chris 
Tohnson, Axel 
Johnson, H. 
Jensen, Robert 
Kealer. James 
Kutsberg, Gustaf 
Kenney, .Tames 
Korme, Fr, 
Lane, Chas. 
T>erh, Paul 
Larsson. John 
Lundqulst, A. 



Larsen, Engvald 
Lane, Charles 
Larsen, Soren 
Lerksher, Heinrich 
McMahon, Jack 
Mathisen, Harry 
Mattheu, J. 
Macrae, Alexander 
Matson, Ellis F. 
Meyer, Dick 
Morris. Frank 
Moninger, Joseph 
Neuling, Geo. A. 
Normen, John 
Norman, Ludwig 
Nielson, Ed. 
Olsen, John A. 
Olsen, Andy 
Olsen, Severin 
Ohlsen. Charles 
Opheim, I^ars 
Oriik. Joseph 
Pedersen, Rasmus 
Petersen, Peter 
Perouse, Andre 
Peterson, Maruets 
Post, A. 
Raetz, Aug. 
Rasmussen, R. Th. 
Roost. Otto 
Rasmussen. Pete 
Rennert, Fred H. 
Richter, Hans 
Rose, Luis C. 
Roche, John 
Sanders, Chas. 
Schmidt, Frits 
Smith, Ernest 
Shroder, Er. 
SJoholm, Waldemar 
Stephen. M. 
Swensson, John B. 
Splnessen, Kurwald 
Tamford, A. 
Turner, A. 
Turner, F. 
Uadren, G. F. 
Wall, A. 

Wenner, Edward 
Wold, Statius 
Wlckstrom, Gustav 
Young, Herbert 
Zunk, Bruno. 
Zimmerman. F. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



I 



SMOKE 

The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union -made cigars. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 



532 Second Street 



Eureka, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG 
Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups. Sarsaparllla and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
-Also bottlers and dealers In Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



Herman Schulze 

- CIGAR MANUFACTURER - 
Cigars at Wholesale and Retail 

439 SECOND STREET 

Corner F EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates 

Front Street, between C and D 

EUREKA, CAL. 



For 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 

or 

A SQUARE MEAL 

Try 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



AMERICAN EXCHANGE HOTEL 
Headquarters for Scandinavians 

OLUF KARLSEN, Proprietor 

GOOD BOARD AND LODGING 

By the Day, Week or Month. Meals 25c. 

First Street, between D and E 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Telephone Main 445 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

THE COSMOPOLITAN 

Furnished Rooms, Club Rooms, Bil- 
liard and Pool Tables, Reading Room 
with latest Swedish, Finn and Nor- 
wegian newspapers. 

BARBER SHOP 
125 D. St., Eureka, Cal. 

ED. SWANSON, Prop. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN. 
San Francisco. 

-Anderson, William Knud.sen, David 
Anderson, Agnes Lanl>orK. A. 



Anderson, Oscar 
Carlson, Gust 
Erikson, John -86 
Erikson, Johan 
Grlss, Anton 
Jansson, Ellas 



Lowherg, A. W. 
Nelson, M. 
Sandset, O. -117 
Smith, Phil 
Spooner, Soli 
Stromberg, Erik 



Joliansen, S. Johan Tauson, Frank 



^^^^^^V^^'^^^/W^N^^VW^N/WS/VN^VWW^^^^VS 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Carl Herman Wesstrom, alias John 
Smith, aged 64, a native of Gothland, 
Sweden, last heard from at San 
Francisco, is inquired for by F. G. 
Klintberg, Point Reyes Life Saving 
Station, Cal. 

William Fayette White, whose 
mother died recently, is inquired for 
by his brother. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please address S. A. 
White, 106 W. Salem Ave., Roanoke, 
Va. 

Charles Olsen, No. 31, a member 
of the Sailors' Union, is urgently 
inquired for by his brother Chris- 
tian. Address Coast Seamen's Jour- 
nal. 

John Rebbentad, who was in the 
.steamship Lukas in November, 1911, 
is inquired for by his brother. Ad- 
dress, Coast Seamen's Journal. 

John Kampe, born at Memel, Ger- 
many, who paid his last dues to the 
Sailors' Union on August 26, 1905, 
at Seattle, Wash., is inquired for by 
the German Consul at San Francisco, 
California. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 
HUOTARI & CO. 

Gents' Furnishings, Boots and Shoes 

Groceries and Notions 
We sell everything, and sell at right 
prices. Union-made Goods Specialty 

You Know the Place 
320 S. F. St., near Sailors' Union Hall 

ABERDEEN, WASH 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service 



Phone 691 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Stand: 
At Sailors' Union Office 



>^^Ni^^N^\A^^A«N/^A^.^SA^^^^h^^^^^^^^^%^>^^^^^^^ 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



ROYAL CIGAR STORE 

Headquarters for Union-made Cigars 

and Tobacco. Red Seal Cigar a 

Specialty. The Place to get 

your Sea Stock. 

Agency for Gloss Union Steam 

Laundry. OLE LUND, Prop. 

S. E. Cor. of Herron and F Sts., 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 
Abreast of Sailors' Union Hall. 



When in Aberdeen Trade at 
BEE HIVE. 

Very best union made Hlckey Shirts, 
Oil Clothing, Eureka Boots, Hats, Shoes, 
Underwear, Beddings, Tobaccos, and no- 
tions for seafaring men. 

JUKKA SAHLSTEIN 
304 South F St., Aberdeen, Wash. 
Near Sailors' Union Hall 
Open Evenings. 



vWORKERS UNION. 



UNIOIWlSrAMP 

Factory 



Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 




OLD TOWN, TACOMA, WASH. 

HTTlilALLEK 

2320 NORTH 30th STREET 

Notice to our Customers: This place will be known as the "Red Front." 
Seamen's Outfitters, Shoes, Rubber Boots, "Sawyer's" Oil Clothing, Flannel Shirts, 

Quilts, Blankets, Etc. 

"Boss of the Road" Overalls, 75c; Hickory Shirts, 50c; Everything Union Made. 

I will give you a square deal as I want your trade. 

Remember the "Red Front," one block north of Union Hall, Old Town. 



THE PIONEER 

Union Made Cigars and Tobacco 

a Specialty 

Wholesale and Retail 

Pool and Billiards 

412 Herron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

G. L. WILLISCRAFT, Prop. 



Headquarters for 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods 

Boots, Shoes, Hats, Etc. 

ALEXANDER'S WHITE HOUSE 

403 East Heron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

next to Burnett's Jewelry Store 

Phone 342 Box 843 

HOTEL OXFORD 

JOHN GRONOVV, Prop. 

Rooms by the week $1.50 up. 

208-12 HERRON STREET 

Aberdeen, Washington 



PORTLAND, OR. 

WM. JOHNSON 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 

For Quick Service Call East 4441. Resi- 
dence Phone Tabor 3. I give you a Claim 
Check for your baggage at home. Give 
me your work or we both lose money. 

Office: 
41 UNION AVE. - - PORTLAND, ORE. 

P. ROSENSTEIN J. G. WOOD 

Workingmen's Store 

Importers and Dealers in 
FINE CUSTOiVI AND READY MADE 

CLOTHING 

Gent's Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, Etc. 
23 N. 3d St., nr. Burnside, Portland, Ore. 
Tel. Main 8295 ROSENSTEIN BROS. 



Tacotna, Wash., Letter List 

Edward 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 

FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made CIGARS, 
TOBACCO, ETC. Call at his old Red 
Stand on Water Street, Port Townsend. 
Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 
around the corner from the Union Offlce. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In LIVE 
STOCK, FRESH MEATS AND VEG- 
ETABLES. Shipping supplied at 
lowest rates. :: Port Townsend, Wash. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Pres. 

Port Townsend Mercantile Co. 

(Inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED 
311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: 
Bartlett Wharf, Port Townsend, Wash. 



Anderson 

-1739 
Anderson 

-1568 
Anderson, Max 
Bausback, Erwin 
Behrins, Emll 
Benson, Charles 
Bioom, Charles 
Buckland, Wm. 
Carson, James 
C^hristensen, Albert 
Erikson, John 
Fors, Alfred 

Gronstrom, WilhelmWeerman, Wm 
Grove, Albert Zornig, Arthur 

Gustafson, Axel 



Jansson, John -2203 
Kesber, Karl 
Albert B. Kirwan, Milton L. 
Knappe, Adolph 
Loren, A. L. 
Martin, Louis -1868 
Marikwardt, Carl 
Munster, Fritz 
Nielsen, C. V. 
Olsen, Martin 
Peterson, F. 
Sovig, Martin 
Swanson, Ben 
Veckenstedt, W. 



Eureka, CaL, Letter List. 



Alexander, G. L. 
Anderson, Otto 
Benson, S. 
Carlson, Gust 
c!!hrlstensen, O. M. 
Frykln, Gust 
Gottberg, Henry 
Grant, John 
GuUiksen, Lars C. 
Hansen, Hans 
Hansen, J. P. 
Hass, H. 
Horlin, Ernest 
Ivars, Cal. 
Jacobsen, Edy 
Johnson, A. 
Johnsen, Arthur 
Johnson, Halvord 
Jensen, Fredrik 
Lane, Dick 
Larsen, K. L.. 
Langevid, Emest 



Lindblom, Ernest 
Menz, Paul 
Menneky, Fred 
Nilson, Andrew G. 
Nilsen, Julius 
Ogren, Harry 
Olsen, C. 
Paludan, Chas. 
Pedersen, Paul 
Pedersen, Martin 
Petterson, Oskar 
Ramsted, A. 
Rawke, Fred O. 
Sinyard, Walter 
Thomas, Joseph W. 
Thompson, Andrew 
Thoresen, Jens 
Wacksmann, Hans 
Wilson, John 
Wallen, L. 
Zebe, Gustav 



THE RED FRONT 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, ETC. 
Union Label Goods 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer In 

Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits 

315 Water St., next to Commercial Bank 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



RAYMOND, WASH. 

THE OLYMPIC CLUB 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, POOL 
and BILLIARDS 

All Daily Papers — Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 

RAYMOND WASHINGTON 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Richard Ryan, who left the British 
steamship Candida at San Francisco 
in July last, is inquired for by the 
British Consuf-General. 

Lott Bartlett Walls, who has been 
sailing for years between San Fran- 
cisco and China, is inquired for by 
his brother, John M. Walls, 2722 
Thomas street, St. Louis, Mo. , 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Nik Gustof Svanberg Nelson, born 

in Roguna Jamtland, Sweden, 44 

years of age, light brown hair, blue 

eyes, dark beard, last heard of on 

Standard Oil Company's ship Mat- 

toppa, is inquired for by his sister. 

Miss Elise Svanberg, 3953 Twen- 
tieth street, San Francisco, Cal. 
William McGrail, of Baltimore, 

Md., who sailed on the Atlantic and 

Gulf Coasts as cook for a number of 

years, is inquired for by his brother, 

George McGrail, 603 Decatur street, 

New Orleans, La. 
The following men, who made 

the trip on the bark Annie Johnson, 

leaving San Francisco on March 21, 

1910, and were paid off at San 

Francisco on June 1, 1910, are in- 
quired for by the Matson Naviga- 
tion Company, San Francisco: Ed. 

Benson, Norway, S3 years, A. B.; 

Nils Johansson, Sweden, 56 years, 

A. B.; Angelino Probaste, Chile, 30 

years, A. B.; F. Sunence, Norway, 

34 years, second mate; R. Kurella, 

Germany, 45 years, carpenter; Her- 
man Johnson, Sweden, 32 years, A. 

B.; P. Allen, France, 40 years, A. B.; 

W. Ellingsen, Sweden, 21 years, A. 

B.; Axel Henriks, Finland, 27 years, 

A. B. The first three named men 

made the round trip and were paid 
off in San Francisco, and the last 

six were paid off in Honolulu. 

Andrew John Anderson, who left 
Aberdeen, Wash., on lumber barge 
Washtura for San Francisco, is in- 
quired for. Any one knowing his 
present whereabouts please notify 
Mrs. Anna Anderson, Aberdeen, 
Wash. 

Salvage money is due to the follow- 
ing seamen, who were members of the 
crew of the steamer Washtenaw, when 
assistance was rendered to a British 
vessel, Leicester Castle, off the east 
coast of South America, during Octo- 
ber, 1908: A. Nessrig, H. Hansen, C. 
Johansen, R. Lewis, C. Alsager, E. 
Erickson, R. Ross, C. Anderson, S. 
Anderson, W. H. Crane, S. Johnson 
and A. Bosbury. Apply to Manager 
Marine Department, Union Oil Co., 
San Francisco. 

Will any of the crew of the John 
Palmer on the voyage from Aus- 
tralia to San Francisco or Pacific 

Coast port last year please call on ' comnianding the Pacific fleet during 
or communicate with F.. R. Wall, 



At a special meeting of the United 
Fruit Company's stockholders at 
Jersey City September 5, unanimous 
approval was given to an increase in 
capital stock from $35,000,000 to $45,- 
000,000. There was 80 per cent, of 
the stock represented at the meeting. 

The Chesapeake Steamship Com- 
pany of Baltimore has placed a con- 
tract for building two steamers with 
the Maryland Steel Company. The 
contract price is believed to be $900,- 
000. The vessels are being built for 
the Baltimore and Richmond route. 

The desire of the Duma to see a 
Russian fleet constructed entirely of 
Russian materials by Russian ship- 
builders and in Russian yards has 
placed the Minister of Marine in a 
difficult position. In any case, part 
of the work will have to be done in 
French yards to ensure rapid com- 
pletion; only the work which cannot 
be done in Russia will be sent to 
France. At the same time, France 
will have an opportunity of finding 
much of the capital for the new 
ships. 

The Canadian Government has 
placed with Messrs. Swan, Hunter 
and Wighani Richardson, Wallsend- 
on-Tyne, a contract for a single- 
screw steamer specially designed for 
the hydrographic survey work. The 
vessel will be 200 ft. in length, and 
will have a speed of 11^ knots. 
There will be a large number of 
watertight compartments so as to 
ensure the safety of the vessel when 
in uncharted waters, and the frames 
are to be of exceptional strength, so 
as to withstand ice pressure. 

By virtue of a law dated June 29, 
19)2, foreign vessels are placed on 
the same footing as Dutch vessels 
as regards the coasting trade be- 
tween those ports in the Nether- 
lands East Indies which have been 
thrown open to general trade. This 
privilege is, however, denied to ves- 
sels flying the flag of any country 
which does not allow Dutch vessels 
at Philadelphia, and afterward sold 
to Houlder, Weir & Boyd, of New 
Trinidadian, which was swept by fire 
at Philadelphia, an afterward sold to 

Shipping arrivals at New York 
from foreign ports during August 
numbered 402 of which 336 were 
steamers, 4 ships, 7 barques and 55 
schooners. The nationality of the 
steamers was as follows: British 
140, American 50, Norwegian 40, 
German 37, Dutch 17, French 15, 
Cuban 11, Italian 8, Danish 4, Aus- 
trian 4, Greek 3, Belgian 2, Spanish 
2, Russian 2, Brazilian 1. During 
the same month coastwise arrivals 
numbered 493, of which 225 were 
from eastern and 268 from south- 
ern ports. 

The old wooden frigate Lan- 
caster has at last been mustered out 
of the United States Navy and here- 
after will be used as a detention 
ship of the Public Health Service. 
Within a few days she will be 
towed from l^eague Island, where 
she has done duty as a receiving 
ship for several years, to the quar- 
antine station in the Delaware River. 
The old frigate was the flagship of 
Rear-Admiral George F. Pearson, 



324 Merchants' Exchange, San Fran- 
cisco, telephone Kearny 394? 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's^ -Journal. 



the Civil War. When the French 
v\'ere installing Maximilian as Em- 
peror of Mexico, she was sent to 
Acapulco to protect American in- 
terests. She performed a similar 
service at Callao during the Peru- 
vian revolution of 1865. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




The United States may acquire a 
big naval base in Asia as the result 
of the recent rejection by China of 
the $350,000,000 international loan. 

A Russian expedition, under M. 
Russianoff, is reported to have an- 
nexed in the Czar's name territory 
around Bell sound in Spitzbergen, 
which is the most valuable part of 
the island. It is claimed this violates 
the rights of the British and Swedish 
Coal Mining Company. 

The Hessian Government is propos- 
ing to construct a bridge over the 
Rhine near Rudesheim. The esti- 
mated cost of the work is 9,863,000 
marks, of which Prussia would con- 
tribute 2.330,000 marks, Hesse 2,- 
018,000 marks and the imperial gov- 
ernment the remainder. 

The outdoor moving picture as an 
educational and recreational factor is 
being given a trial in Montreal, 
Canada. The child welfare moving 
picture committee was formed to 
educate the people and to create a 
civic demand for the child's weal. 
The city parks are being used and 
three performances a week are being 
given. 

It is felt generally that Cuba is ap- 
proaching a crisis in its history as a 
republic. Two serious questions oc- 
cupy the public mind. Can Cuba 
survive the present state of her 
finances? Can she hold an honest 
and orderly election for the Presi- 
dency with a loyal submission of the 
defeated party to the will of the ma- 
jority. 

France has decided to build a 
squadron of swift, armed dirigibles 
for its aerial war fleet in addition 
to the aeroplanes already possessed 
by the army. Four great steerable 
balloons of the non-rigid type have 
been ordered by the Government. 
These are to have a speed of about 
forty-three and one-half miles an 
hour and are to be armed with ma- 
chine guns. 

During the coming session of the 
Danish Parliament the chief interest 
will be centered on the introduction 
of the Government measure for the 
abolition of plural voting for mem- 
bers of the Lanstinget, the upper 
house of the Danish Legislature. The 
Conservatives will lose heavily by the 
abolition of plural voting, and the 
present Government will not gain 
anything, while the radicals will have 
their voting strength greatly aug- 
mented. 

Nineteen striking coal miners at 
Renton were cited to appear in the 
Federal Court at Seattle on October 
12 to answer charges of contempt 
of court for the alleged violation of 
an injunction restraining them from 
interfering with non-union men em- 
ployed in the mines of the Puget 
Sound Light, Power and Traction 
Company. The men are accused of 
having attempted to intimidate strike- 
breakers. 

The question of the taxes on food 
in Germany has reached a crisis. 
An enormous demonstration, or- 
ganized with all the extraordinary 
genius of the Socialists of Berlin and 
the other great German , industrial 
cities, has been held, to protest 
against the continuation of the pres- 
ent condition of things, and to de- 
mand the immediate opening of the 
Reichstag; the permission for live 
stock and flesh to cross the frontiers 
without duty; the removal of premi- 
ums on grain exports, and the aboli- 
tion of all the food duties. 



San Francimco Letter Liat. 



Letters at the San Francisco Sailors, 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mall is advertised In 
these columns should at once notify 
P. Scharrenberg, Headquarters Sailors' 
Union, San Francisco, to forward same 
to the port of their destination. 



-1772 

-992 



A. P. 



A. 
H. 
L. P. 



Aga, J. 

Albrechtsen, A. 
Alf 

Alklnson, S. 
Allen, J. M. 
Alterleabing. nick 
Andersen, C. L. 
Andersen, E. 
Andresen -1360 
Andersen, -1526 
Anderson, A. 
Anderson 
Ander.son 
Anderson, -922 
Anderson, A. 
Anderson, 
Baardsen. G. 
Baere, H. 
Bahr, F. 
Bakker. H. 
Bang, M. 
Barton, W. 
Bath. C. 
Bausback. E. 
Baxter, B. 
Beck, E. 
Beckel. B. 
Behr. H^nry 
Beigh, B. 
Belrsen, A. 
Bckker. Ch. 
Bengtson, M. 
Bengtsson. John 
Benson, -1894 
Berg, J. 
Berglund, R. 
Bergman, Li. J. 
Bergen, P. 
Bergman, E. 
Bergstein, H. 
Bergsten. R. 
Bergstrom, A. 
Berlin, W. 
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Beugh, L. B. 
Bianca, F. 
Callan, J. 
Capllnger. O. 
Carl.sen, C. 
Carlson. Chas. J. 
Carlsson, -876 
Carlstrom, G. 
Carlstrum, J. 
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Chaler, B. 
Chrlstensen, 
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Chrlstensen, 
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Daragher, J. 
Darwin. Richard 
Day, H. 
Daylor, W. J. 
Dempsey, H. 
Devany, D. 
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Eckers, R. 
Edgerton, J. 
Kdstrom, J. 
Edwards, D. 
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Einardt, J. 
Ek, C. 

Ekendahl, W. 
Ellingsen, B. 
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Eager. J. 
Fagerll, O. 
Farnen, W. 
Faulkner, J. E. 
Fell, Olaf 
Flgved, S. 
FInck, J. 
Fischer, P. 
Geggus, Ch. 
Ganzalez, D. 
Gerner. H. 
Glllholm, A. 
G.iardahl. S. 
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Goodrlge, M. 
Gorgensen, A. 
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Grauers, Gust. 
Halsather, S. 
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Hallenberg, 
Halvorsen, A. 
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Hannus. A. 
Hansen, Ch. Q. 
Hansen, C. M. 
'Tansen, E. 
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Hansen, J. 
Hansen, J. M. 
Hansen, J. N. 
Hansen, N. 
Hansen, R. 

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.Tahanssen -1908 
Jakabson, F. 
JanofT, A. 
.Tanson. Fr 
.Jennings. Q. 
Jensen, P. 
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; Jensen, -2062 
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Jensen, H. 
.lensen, I. M. 
.Jensen, J, 
Jensen, M. 



Anderson, Friz 
Anderson, K. O. 
Anderson. M. 
Anderson, Oscar 
Anderson, S. M. 
Anderson, S. P. 
Anderson, Tom 
Anderson, V. 
Andreassen, -1136 
Anis, J. 
Antonsen, M. 
Appelqulst, Otto 
Arbrlcks, A. 
Armstrong, T. 
Aspe, W. 

Blrkelbach, W. 
B.ierk, G. 
Bjorn, K. 
Bjornstad, M. 
Blachburn. G. 
Black, J. 
Black, V. 
Blank, G. 
Blecha, A. 
Bllkshaven, S. 
Block, W. 
Blomberg, G. 
Blumel, W. 
Borgesen, H. 
Bowers, G. 
Boy -1715 
Bradley, A. 
Bragge, H. 
Brains, C. 
Brander. V. 
Brans, S. 
Brerienbach. A. 
Bredesen, J. 
Brennar, L. 
Brlggs, J. 
Brown, -655 
Bruce, O. 
Bryde. Ch. 
Buaas, T. 
Bulb, E. 

Christophersen, R. 
Classen, G. 
Classen, H. 
Clausen, J. 
Clever, H. 
Coast, S. 
Collins. F. 
Connell, H. P. 
Conrad. H. 
Corneliussun, Iv. 
Cornell, R. 
Cranby, J. 
Curtis. R. 

Dlller, Edw. 
Dixon, J. 
Dobrlck. J. 
Dockrell, W. 
Donelly. W. 
Dornquist, O. 
Douglas. K. H. 
Dreger, J. 
Elml. A. 
Egeland. Olaf 
Engelhard, F. 
Engstram, M. R. 
Erdmann, B. J. 
Erickson, G. 
Erickson, E. R. 
Erlksen, K. H. 
Erikson, Emit 
Evans, E. 
Evensen, J. 
Evensen, ti. 
Evensen. M. 

Fjellman, J. 
Flem, K. 
Flemens, P. 
Forsgren, K. 
Fox, R. 

Frederiksen, B. 
Fredrlkstad 

Gray, A. 
Gregory. P. 
Gronman, H. R. 
Gros, J. 

Groschefskle, F. 
Guddlng, A. 
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Gundersen, -899 
Gundersen -785 
Gunter, M. 
Gustafson, J. 

Hanson -1786 
Hanson, J. P. 
Hanssen, -1867. 
Harjes, Albert 
Harrhorson, H. 
Hartog, J. 
Haugen, L. 
Haupt, E. 
Heiberger, B. 
Helen, P. 
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Henriksen, J. 
Henrlkson, H. 
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Hermansson, -1622 
Hesche, H. 
Hilsen. Ingvald 
Holt, I. 
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Hoyle, H. 
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Jespersen, M. 
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Johansen, H .B. E. 
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Johanson, -2186 
Johansen, 
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Johansson, J. 
Johnsen, J. 
Johnsen, P. 
Johnsen, V. 



Johnson, Alrik 
Johnson, E. S. 
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Joiinson, O. 
Johnson, "W. 
Kahlberg. W. 
Kallas, M. 
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Kallos, J. 
Kane, G. 
Karlson, S. 
Karlsson. E. 
Karsgaard, H. 
Keiss, Li. 
Keskulas, Johan 
Kidman, J. 
Kllpatrick, C. 
Kipper, H. 
Klahn, Ch. 
Klarsen, A. 
Kleppe, T. 
Klick, A. 
Laakso, F. 
Laatz, O. 
Nagerberg, Pete 
Laine, E. 
Laizkowkl, A. 
Lange, P. 
Lapinsalo, O. 
Larsen, E. 
Larsen, H. M. 
I.ars.m -1700 
I.,arsen, -1570 
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I>arsen, M. 
I..arsen, P. 
Larson. C. H. 
Larson, F. 
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Mansen, M. 
Markmann, H. 
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Martin, O. 
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Marthlassen, N. 
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Nielsen, A. 
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Olsen, Oscar Efralm 

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Papeljoglon, C. 
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Pearson, A. 

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Pedersen, R. 

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Perkins, F. 

Peron, Edmond 
Perry, D. 
Peters. J. 

Petersen. A. L. 
Petersen, A. R. 

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Petersen, H. 

Quezada, B. 

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Rasmussen, H. 

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Relnke. F. 

Saastedt. N. 

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Sanne, R. 

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Schlachter 

Schluter. P. 

Schmidt, G. 

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Schroder, F. 

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Kromer, F. 
Kuhnert, W. 
'vvpivik. Oscar 
Kvestad, H. 

Leahy. W. 
Leidecker, K. 
Lerstern, J. O. 

O. 
Llegman, T. 
Lind, G. 
Linrusi, J. 
Lowberg. A. 
Lude. T. 
Ludvigsen. -1249 
Lund, -599 
Lundbeck, Ch. 
Lundberg, C. 
Lunde, Ole 
Lundgren, R. 
I^undin. -10.')4 
Lundqulst, H W. 
Lynch, J. -1586 

McKeowen, Th. 
McMahon, J. T. 
Mcplierson. R. 
Mectors. G. 
Mestars, G. 
Meyer, Ch. 
Meyer, M. 
Michelson, J. 
MIkelson, C. 
Miller, W. 
Minter, 
Moberg. K. 
Moen, H. 
Moen, R. 
Mohr. E. 
Momson, D. 

Lr.) 
Morrison, D. 
Mulr, W. D. 
Muller, W. 
Munsen, A. 
Murphy, J. A. 
Murphy. Michael 
Mynchniyer, H. 

Nielsen. O. 
Nielsen. P. W. C. 
Nielsen. W. A. T. 
Nilsson, -784 
Nolan. G. S. 
Nordlund, G. 
Norris, E. 
Norris, N. 
Nurgl, Peter 

Olsen, P. 

Olsen, S. 
Olsen. W. 
Olson, A. 
Olson, B. 
Olson. -.'■)62 
Olsson, O. -910 
Olsson -705 
Olsson, G. M. 
O'Neill, J. 
Opderbeck, — 

Petersen, O. 
Peterson, J. 
Petersen, S. 
Peterson, -1389 
Petersson, -1301 
Pettcrsen, -1154 
Petterson. A. * 
Pettersson. E. 
Pettersson. -1447 
Petrick. T. 
Phillips, Geo. 
Piroise, E. 
Piterick, H. 
Pittman, A. 
I'oobos, L. 
Posa, T. 
Poyyre, G. 
Puntll -1466 
Purgold, G. 



Qulnn. Wm. 

Resvoll, F. P. 
RIegel, W. 
Riley. R. H. 
Rippe, R. 
Rivero. John 
Roche. J. 
Rosbeck, G. 
Rudberg. Chas 
Rund, H. 
Simpson, L. 
SIngleman, E. 
Sjoblom. K. 
SJoblum, K. 
Sjogren, J. 
Skedmo, -2613 
Smith. Ch. 
Smith. J. V. 
Snlngle. W. 
Sonnenberg. J. 
Sorger. E. 
Sparks, A. 
Stahlbaum, E. 
Stangeland, P. 
Stein, -2099 
Stendhahn. F. 
Stengard. V. 
Stenlund, J. 
Sting, Ch. 
Storm. Th. 
Strand, Ch. 
Strand, O. 
Sund, A. 
Sundberg, C. 
Sundberg, R. 



Sundquist, E. 
Svane, A. 
Svenssen. J. 
Thomas, H. 
Thomel. E. 
Thonipsen, E. 
Thompson, A. 
Thompson. St. 
Thomsen, T. 
Therein, J. 
Thorsell, Ch. 
Thorssell, F. N. 
Thorsen. J. 
UdekuU, Ch. 
Valbu. H. 
Valles. A. 
Venema, H. 
Wakroam, J. 
Walters. Albert B. 
Walti, J. 
Wambark. G. 
Weclimann, P. 
Wehrtens, H. 
Weidt, H. P. 
Wergaard, J. 
Werner, Ch. 
West, H. 
Westman, A. 
Wetzel, M. 
Youngberg, H. 
Zechel. W. 



Svensson, -1995 
Svensson. -1295 
Syvertsen, H. 
Tillman, A. 
■rodal, M. 
-jl'oegersen. -798 
Toft, H. 
Tollefsen, A. 
Torklldsen, M. 
Tornkvist, M. 
Townsend. R. 
Tronscn, J. M. 
Tuppltz, .E. 

VIorock, H. 
Vllhelmson. S. 

Wiberg, J. E. 
Wickstrom 
Wllitol, E. 
Wilen, J. 
Williamson, W. 
Wilsen, J. 
Winblad, M. 
Wintlier. Hans 
White, G. 
Wolttr, H. 
Work, J. 



Zunk, B. 



PACKAGES. 

Apply to Secretary - of Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific. 



Apple, A. 
Andoistn. A. 
Balda, A. 
Berlin, W. 
Blirhavn, S. 
Block. Wm. 
BiiiK(iuisl, G. A. 



Johnson. J. N.. -2161 
Jorgensen. Oluv 
Kallberg, C. 
Marten, H. 
Mersman A. 
Nnrri.s, Ed. 
Olsson. Carl 



Chilsloffersen, Olof Pedersen, J. -113s 



Evensen, M 
Gunther, J. 
Hall. G. A. 
Halversen. H. 
Hansen. Karl 
Hartmere -1245 
Jenkins, Fred 
Jensen. -2110 



I^rieberg. P. 
Funis, T. 
Rasmussen. E. 
.'^tolt. A. J. 
Sullivan. John 
Tupplts. 
Walters. A. 
Walttl. H. 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Alexander. A. E. 
Andersson, Ernest 
Anderson, Axel 
Andre. Fred 
Antonsen, John 
Anderson -1420 
Aulto -1780 
Bakker, Haakon 
Brancler, Wm. 
Coldwell, J. 
Clausen, Fred 
Cristiansen, O. M. 
1 'reger, John 
Dickenson. KIchard 
Elenius, Axel 
Ellergaard, M. 
Gewold. M. O. 
Graf. Otto 
Hansen. Jack 
Holm, Hans 
Hakonssen, C. 
Hanssen. H. 
Herman, Axel 
Iverdtsen. S. B. 
Ingebrethsen. John 

A. 
.Johannessen, J. H. 
Jenson, J. F. 
Janes. Harvey 
Johnsen. Karl 
Jensen. George 
Jacobsen. -1486 
Johannson. -2077 
Johansson, C. R. 
Jorgensen, Peder 
Johansson, C. A. 
Knudsen, B. 
Kaltas. August 
T..indholm, C. 
Loining, Herman 
Lanistsen, George 



Lundgren, K. 6. 
Louis, B. J. 
Larsen, Johan 
Lindroos, A. W. 
MacManus, Hugh 
MacPherson, Kobert 
Martin, John B. 
Mattson, K. A. 
Oksanen, Juku 
Olsson, Fred 
Pentz. Otto 
Pedersen -1054 
Pearson, Charles 
Petersen, Christian 
Robertson, A. 
Rudt 

Rosen f eld, Paul 
Rasehlun. Franz 
Sundman. Emll 
Siren, Frans 
Strom, -2340 
Siven, Wiktor 
Schneider, H. 
Sandby, James 
Schevic, A. B. 
Strasdin, H. 
Tollefsen, Andreas 
Tvede, Jens 
Vejada, -190 
Weber, Walter 
Wilson, P. S. 

PACKAGES. 
Anderson -1283 
Glaff, Otto 
Hansen, John 
Julius, P. 
T>ehtinpn. Kaarlo 
Otto -1780 
I'edersen, Peder 
Pollson, Tom 
Uggla. Kred. 



MARINE COOKS' LETTER LIST 
Seattle, Wash. 



Adams, H. 
Andraca, Alf. 
Baker, J. 
Bailey. Wm. 
Barboner. G. N. 
Barker. A. E. 
Bridges, Noel 
Cahlll, John 
Champion, Eric 
Claer. Harry 
De Bruin, Tac 
Earl, A. 
Engstrom, Swan 
Flones, Fortunda 
Gandy, Jas. 
Gray, R. 
Hardy, Jack 
Howard, Jas. 



Kenealy, E. 
King, R. G. 
Mills, Geo. 
Meyer, Julius 
Mongan, H. E. 
McMullen. T. J. 
Nielsen. Peter S. 
Pestell. Stanley 
Piers. Claude 
Redfern, R. 
Rollan, M. 
Smithers, J. 
Smith, Marcus 
Snieder, G. J. 
Stacy, Frank 
Thaver, Chas. 
Third, B. 
TInoco. Joe 



When making purchases from our 
auvertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 

Office Hours Saturdays, 7 to 8 p. m. 
.Ml watch repairing guaranteed 2 years 

Robt. Rolla Watch Club 

506 Market Street, San Francisco 

Watches, Chains, Rings, Pins, Dia- 
monds, and all other precious stones 
at very reasonable prices. 



THE HARBOR HOTEL 

Formerly "The Mohawk" 

132 EAST STREET 

Opposite Ferry 

STEAM HEAT. HOT AND COLD 

WATER IN EVERT ROOM 



Elevator Service Free Baths 

and a Large Reading Room 

Rates: 

$2.00 PER WEEK AND UP 

50c PER DAY AND UP 

T. L. SELCHAU P. N. NANSBN 

Proprietors 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY -AT- LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and Marl<et Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 

(THE GERMAN BANK) 

Savings incorporated 1868 Commercial 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

(Member of the Associated Savings 

Banks of San Francisco.) 
The following Branches for Receipt 
and Payment of Deposits only: 

MISSION BRANCH, 2572 Mission St., 
between 21st and 22nd. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, 601 
Clement St., corner 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, 1456 
Haight St., near Masonic Ave. 

June 29th, 1912: 

Assets $51,140,101.75 

Capital actually paid up in 

Cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent 

Funds 1,656,403.80 

Employees' Pension Fund.... 140,109.60 
Number of Depositors 56,609 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock A. M. to 3 
o'clock P. M., except Saturdays to 12 
o'clock M. and Saturday evenings from 
6:30 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. M., 
for receipt of deposits only. 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
$2 to $2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bells and Hot and Cold Water in 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGRBN, Manager. 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front St. and Broadway, op- 
posite Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier 

400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c 
per night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 
month. Baths, Reading Room. Office 
open all night. Best place near 
waterfront. Investigate. 



UNITED STATES WATCH CLUB 

FINE WATCH REPAIRING 



E. F. COLLINS, Manager 



10 EAST STREET S. W. Corner Market 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Kelleher & Browne 

THE IRISH TAILORS 

716 MARKET— Opposite Third— 33 GEARY 

NEW FALL SUITINGS 




ALL SUITS ARE MADE IN OUR OWN 
SHOP BY SKILLED UNION TAILORS. 



They are paid by the week. 
No piece work. 
SUITS TO ORDER FROM $30.00 TO $50.00 

C. BREINING. Marine Representative 



JORTALL BROS. EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 
206 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Dougia* 5348 

INFORMATION WANTED. 



HOTEL SANTA FE 

684 FOLSOM STREET 
Near Third Street 
100 all sunny furnished rooms. Elec- 
tric light, hot and cold water. Rates, 
25c to 75c per day, Jl.SO to $3.00 per 
week. Baths. Phone Home J 4230. Open 
allnight. 

Phone Kearny 2503 

HOTEL COLCHESTER 

259 East St., Cor. of Jackson 
Rates: 30c per Day up, $1.75 per 
Week up. 

Hot and Cold Water In Every Room. 
Free Baths and Showers. 

PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 
We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 
Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTE.R N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Union Label Paper and Envelopes 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

Union-made Shoes 

HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING 

GOODS, ETC. 
Fair Prices. Reliable Goods. 

50 East St., and 4 Mission St.. 
San Francisco 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



FurnitureMovingbyMotorcar 

San Francisco and 
Suburban Towns 



FORSMANN & HUSEBY 
55 Market St. Phone Douglas 4400 

Anchor House 

S. PETERSON, Prop. 

FURNISHED ROOMS 

Reading Room. Electric Lights. 

495 THIRD ST. San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5390 



C. Hansen, G. Olsen, J. Johnson 
and J. Nolan are requested to call 
at the P. C. S. S. Co.'s office for 
money due for clothing lost in steam- 
er Queen. 

William Moran, who left Buffalo 
forty-two years ago, at the age of 
12 years, is inquired for by his 
sister. Address Mrs. Catherine Mo- 
ran Fossett, 421 Norinal avenue. Buf- 
falo, N. Y. 

Charles Harold Allen, who has 
served as an apprentice in a British 
ship, age about 21 years, medium 
height, brown hair, last heard of in 
San Francisco November 9, 1911, is 
anxiously inquired for by his father. 
Please notify British Consul-General 
at .San Francisco. 

.\'ils Nielsen, No. 204, a native ot 
Norway, born 1862, on the Pacific 
Coasi since 1892, was last in the S. 
S. Wilhelmina. Inquired for by Mrs. 
Lina Svensen, 852 Treat Ave., San 
Francisco. 

Will John O'Brien. Walter Sin- 
yard J. Halvossen, Fred Weber or 
W. Hansen, who were on the 
schooner "Albert Meyer" last Janu- 
ary when W. Blodsing got hurt 
leaving Santa Rosalia, please commu- 
nicate with F. R. Wall, attorney for 
Blodsing, at 324 Merchants' Ex 
change, San Francisco. 

W. Kahlberg, No. 688, and C. Mon 
sen. No. 1964, are inquired for at 
the Standard Oil Company's office, 
at San Francisco. 

Nils Johnson, who was wrecked 
in the American bark Oasis, Sept. 2, 
1887, is inquired for by W. F. Ho- 
henschild, Berkeley, Cal. 

Duncan Carmichael, a native of 
Glasgow, last heard of in San Fran- 
cisco about three years ago, is 
anxiously inquired for by his father. 
Address, Seamen's Institute, San 
Francisco. 

Fred Victor Ford, a native of Eng- 
land, aged 35, of medium height, is 
very anxiously inquired for by his 
mother and little daughter. Please 
notify British Consul General at San 
Francisco. 

Albert Smith, a native of Cork, Ire- 
land, who left the American ship 
John C. Meyer, on Feb. 20, 1911, 
is very anxiously inquired for by 
his wife. Please notify British Con- 
sul General at San Francisco. 



C. J. SWANSON 

CLASSY CLOTHIER 

HATTER AND FURNISHER 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

UNIFORMS 

Gold Braids and Gold Wreaths of 
All Descriptions 

119 EAST STREET 

Between Merchant and Washington 

SAN FRANCISCO ■ CALIFORNIA 

Phone Douglas 1082 
Home Phone C-3486 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUPACTURERS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Douglas 1660 




SHIRTS^ 



AT 



JOHIMSON'S 

2558 MISSION ST. 
San Francisco 



Honolulu Letter List 



Amundsen, Albert 
Albrecht, Clarence 
Bredsen, John 
Berthold, Willy 
Christensen, Theo- 

dor 
Douglas, Sam 
Darlin, Harry 
Dahlin, H. 
Ekstrom, Geo. 
Predriksen. Rudolf 
Greenace, Charles 
Hahn, John H. 
Hansen, L. 
Holm, H. John 



Langer. Robert 
Lundqulst, Alex. 
Matljeson, Louis 
Munze, Dick 
McPherson, Louis 
Morgan, Hugh 
Nystrom, R. 
Norris, Ned 
Rods, B. 

Rosbeck, Gustav 
Slmonsen, Fred 
Saunders, Wm. J. 
Slevert, Hermann 
Swanson. Martin 
Smith, John 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Home News 



Will August Eklund, Fred Weber, 
G. W. Schrej, or any other seaman 
who was on the Albert Meyer at the 
time W. Bladsing was hurt leaving 
Santa Rosalia last January, please 
communicate with F. R. Wall, 324 
Merchants' Exchange. 

W. A. Goodrich, who left the Brit- 
ish ship Puritan at San Francisco, 
February 6, 1911, is in(iuired for by 
the British Consul-General at San 
Francisco. 



Between twenty and thirty work- 
men were buried in the ruins of the 
new Davis hotel, under construction 
at Kansas City, Mo. 

Miss Lucy Goodc White, the first 
woman in California to receive a 
•udicial nomination, failed to pass 
her bar examination. 

.\ new union station to be liuilt 
at St. Paul is expected to cost be- 
tween $4,000,000 and $5,000,000, with 
an expenditure of $4,000,000 more 
for land and trackage. 

In the will of John Arbuckle, cof- 
fee merchant, filed with Surrogate 
Ketchum in Brooklyn, N. Y., it is 
shown that an estate of $30,357,790.- 
66 was left, which will be divided 
e(|nally between his two sisters, the 
only immediate heirs. 

California's new industry is "grow- 
ing humans," according to Dr. Wil- 
liam F. Snow, who is at Washington 
in charge of the health conservation 
car which will be an exhibit of the 
California State Board of Health dur- 
ing the Hygienic Congress. 

Surgeon-General Rupert Blue of 
the Public Health and Marine Hos- 
pital Service has been asked to take 
steps to isolate the family of Antonio 
Volcanc, now living at Spokane, 
Wash., two members of which are 
said to be suffering from leprosy. 

Federal statisticians who have been 
working on an egg census announced 
that there are now in the cold stor- 
age warehouses awaiting consumption 
1,173,133,800 eggs, as compared with 
1,119,090,000 at this time last year. 
This is an increase of more than 
50,000,000 eggs. 

The fourth arrest to result from 
the Suffolk County Grand Jury in- 
vestigation of the alleged dynamite 
"planting" in Lawrence during the 
textile strike last January occtirred 
on September 21, when William R. 
Rice, an F-last Milton quarry owner, 
was taken into custody. 

Completed figures are now avail- 
able concerning immigration into the 
United States during the fiscal year 
1912, and show the numerical trend 
downward, wliicli began two years 
ago, is still continuing. The total 
number of aliens who arrived during 
the 12 months ending July 1 was 
838,172. This was about 40,000 less 
than during the preceding year, when 
a total of 870,587 were admitted, and 
about 200,000 less than in 1910, when 
a high-water mark of 1,041,570 was 
reached. 

The national forests of the United 
States cover nearly 190,000,000 acres, 
of. tf) state the case in another way, 
there arc 162 national forests, averag- 
ing more than 1.000,000 acres each. 
This means that the Federal Gov- 
ernment is by far the largest em- 
ployer of expert foresters. Of the 
total number of foresters in the 
country, 60 per cent., it is estimated, 
are working for the Government, 
and at different times 95 per cent. 
of them are said to have been so 
employed. 

Statements showing the expendi- 
ture of thousands of dollars by Con- 
gressmen in their efTorts to capture 
renominatian for reelection were 
made pul)lic recently in accordance 
with the Ruckcr law. Representa- 
tive lleald of Delaware, according 
to these figiU'cs, spent more to ob- 
tain renomination than any other 
member of the House. He leads all 
others with a total of $5560. The 
salary of a Congressman is $7500 a 
year. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 



have seen a lot of men go before 
conventions with those same recom- 
mendations and fail to get more than 
a complimentary vote." — Washington 
Star. 



Another Idiot. — Diggs — What do 
you think of that idiot Jones? He 
always answers one question by ask- 
ing another. 

Biggs — Does he? — Boston Tran- 
script. 



Why They Love Him. — Mrs. Ben- 
ham — .Ml the world loves a lover. 

Benham — ^Sure! A man can be 
popular any time if he is willing to 
make a fool of himself. — New York 
Globe. 



He Knew. — Young Bachelor — I 
often wonder if I'm making enough 
money to get married on. 

Old Benedick— Well, I don't know 
how much you're making, but you 
ar'n't! — London Opinion. 



Where Divorce Was Futile. — "In 
ancient Greece when a man was di- 
vorced the law provided that he 
must not marry a woman who was 
younger than his first wife." 

"Did they ever have a divorce case 
in ancient Greece?" — Chicago Rec- 
ord-Herald. 



Overpowering. — "Is you gwine ter 
let dat mewel do as he please?" 
asked Uncle Ephraim's wife. "Wha's 
you' will power?" 

"My will power is all right," he 
answered. "You jest want ter come 
out hyar an' measure dis here 
mewel's won't power." — Christian 
Register. 



Tommy's Persistency. — The teach- 
er had been reading to the class 
about the great forests of America. 
"And now, boys," she announced 
afterward, "which one of you can 
tell me the pine that has the long- 
est and sharpest needles?" 

Up went a hand in the front row 

"Well, Tommy?" 

"The porcupine, ma'am." — Univer- 
salist Leader. 



Joint Accounts 

This bank will open accounts In the 
name of two Individuals, for Instance, 
man and wife, either of whom may 
deposit money for or draw against the 
account. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

783 MARKET STREET, n«ar Fourth 
San Francisco 



Bagley's Navy 
Plug 

A FINE CHEW 
Give It a Trial 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 
Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 
House, San Francisco, Gal. 
THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL, 
1."? under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equip- 
ped with all modern appliances to illustrate 
and teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation in the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always in view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and is now, in addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There Is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how ignorant the seaman may be, even In the rudiments of 
common education. Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and In a 
comparatively short Interval of time. WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY 





Agent U. S. Government Charts and Nau- 
tical Publications, Hydrographlc and Geodetic 

H. J. H. LORENZEN 

12 MARKET STREET 

Comer of Sacramento and Market Streets 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Dealer in 

Watches Chronometers Clocks 

Solid Gold Goods Diamonds 



MARINE & FIELD GLASSES 

NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 

EXPERT REPAIRING 

Watches, Chronometers and Jewelry 

Rates Determined by Transit Observations 

Chronometers and Sextants Rented 



J. COHEM &. CO. 



Baltimore ClotHing Co. 

72 EAST STREET, S. R, Next to SAILORS' UNION HALL 

Have Your Suit and Overcoat Made by Them. WHY? 
UNION LABEL IN COAT, VEST AND PANTS 

OUR CUSTOMERS ARE UNION MEN. WE SELL UNION MADE 

GOODS ONLY. 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 



When Drinking Beer 
See that this Label is 
on the Keg or Bottle 




llnion 



MADE 

Beer 




T^le 

AND 

Porter 



"^3)0 Of America r^c^yr 

COPYRIGHT STRAOE MARK REGISTERED 1903 




Eyes Examined Free 



£^ 



Repairing Our Specialty 



Janus J^. Sorensen 

^t9 end Jf99*. 



JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 

715 MARKET STREET - - - Near Call Bldg. 

2593 MISSION STREET - - - Near 22nd St. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

The Largest Jewelry Store, with the Largest Stock, at 
the Lowest Prices 

ALL WATCH REPAIRING WARRANTED FOR TWO 
YEARS 



^-^ |. iW^^'V W^^'¥~"*W^ ^^ ^** *^^* *^'^ label (in light 
^^ IX/I C J iw i"^.^ I^L ^^ blue) appears on the box in 



which you are served. 




IStPtiMO, 



'<e«*-'i '-"r* . •i^'.-^sws^^^s-r) .^fv I'^s^r^^SSy 



Issued by Autbcity of uie Ciga/ Maners' Irrtefnallonal Union of Americj 

Union-made Cigars. 

(Ulij Sntifif^. IMtl>atn(XMamdlnlN>Solimta«nMbyiriCH<lESln>VM 

II 0' THE aCW MMEn'IIITUIIUIIOIlU. vm*it Amuu. » oriunMi liooted tt ti» ad' 

nloflbcllOIUlMtTDIMnlllirUlICnuiWlUtUOrMaiMT. nutimm'i 
toaJIsndMnUHBiiiAouttiM wwW 




A Well Stocked 

MEN'S AND BOYS' 
FURNISHINGS 
DEPARTMENT 

Offers Complete Lines and 
Good Values in Staple Brands 
of 

UNDERWEAR, 
HOSIERY, 
SHIRTS, 
COLLARS and 
ACCESSORIES 




Market and Sixth Sts. 
San Francisco 



LUNDSTROM HATS 

Are made in San Francisco and sold 
in 5 Stores: 

72 MARKET STREET 

1178 MARKET STREET 

605 KEARNY STREET 

2640 MISSION STREET 

26 THIRD STREET 

ALL UNION HATS 



^^^^^V^^^^^^^»^^^VW^W^N^V<»^WWWS^^\^ 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



H. SAMUEL, 

Also known as Sam, 

610 THIRD STREET 

Between Townsend and Brannan Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Gents' Clothing 
and Furnishings 

Furnisiiing Goods, Hats, Caps, Trunks, 
Valises, Bags, Etc., Boots, Shoes, Rubber 
Boots and Oil Clotiiing. Seamen's Out- 
tils a specialty. 

If you want flrst-ciass goods at the 
lowest marltet price, give us a call. Do 
not inalie a mistalce — Look for the Name 
and Number. 



^^^^^^^^»^W^VN^^^>^/VN^VWWN^V>^N^V^<%^N^VN^V^ 



CJUflBOSltH 

OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 



S' 






FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXVI, No. 5. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1912. 



Whole No. 2195. 



CALIFORNIA STATE FEDERATION. 



The Thirteenth Annual Convention of the Cal- 
ifornia State Federation of Labor, which met at 
San Diego during last week, was the best at- 
tended and most successful Labor convention 
ever held in the State. 

Representatives of the men who go to sea 
were active participants in all the work of the 
convention. More than seventy different propo- 
sitions dealing with the problems of the organ- 
ized wage workers of California were acted upon. 
Several resolutions of particular interest to sea- 
men were adopted, as follows: 

Endorsement of Seamen's Bill. 

Whereas, The Seamen's bill (No. 23,673), now 
pending in the Senate of the United States, is 
designed, first, to promote safety of travel by 
sea, by establishing a manning scale for passen- 
ger carrying vessels and a standard of individ- 
ual efficiency in the men composing the crews 
of such vessels; second, to encourage the growth 
of a body of American merchant seamen, by re- 
pealing antiquated parts of the Navigation Laws 
under which the seamen are being oppressed and 
enslaved, and replacing them by statutes con- 
forming to present day conceptions of justice as 
between employer and employe, thus making it 
possible for a man to engage in a sea calling 
without sacrificing his rights as a citizen; there- 
fore be it 

Resolved, By the California State Federation 
of Labor, in Thirteenth Annual Convention as- 
sembled, at San Diego, October 7-12, 1912, that 
we endorse the said Seamen's bill and urge our 
Senators and Congressmen to work for its 
speedy passage; further 

Resolved, That the officers of this Federation 
be instructed to aid in every way possible in 
promoting the passage of said bill. 

Asiatics on American Ships. 

Whereas, American ships in the foreign trade 
employ as their crews alien Chinese; and 

Whereas, This is done by authority of the 
opinion of the Attorney-General of the United 
States, to the efifect that a seaman is not a la- 
borer within the meaning of the Chinese Exclu- 
sion Act; and 

Whereas, The Supreme Court of the United 
States, in a case involving the right of an alien 
Chinese to land in the United States from an 
American vessel, has declared that "American 
ship is American soil"; therefore be it 

Resolved, By the California State Federation 



of Labor, in Thirteenth Annual Convention as- 
sembled, that we demand the same protection 
for American seamen as is provided by the Chi- 
nese Exclusion Act for all other workers. 
Exclusion of All Asiatics. 

Whereas, The menace of Chinese labor, now 
greatly allayed by the passage and enforcement 
of the Chinese Exclusion Act, has been suc- 
ceeded by an evil similar in its general charac- 
ter but much more threatening in its possibili- 
ties, to wit: The emigration to the United 
States and its insular territory of large and in- 
creasing numbers of Japanese, Koreans, Hindus 
and other races of natives of Asia; and 

Whereas, The American public sentiment 
against the immigration of Chinese labor, as ex- 
pressed and crystallized in the enactment of 
the Chinese Exclusion Act, finds still stronger 
justification in the demanding of prompt and 
adequate measures of protection against the im- 
migration of Japanese, Koreans and Hindus and 
other races native of Asia, Qn the grounds (1) 
that the wage and living standard of such labor 
are dangerous to, and must, if granted recogni- 
tion in the United States, prove destructive of 
the American standards in these essential re- 
spects; (2) that the racial incompatibility as be- 
tween the peoples of the Orient and the United 
States present a problem of race preservation 
which it is our imperative duty to solve in our 
own favor, and which can only be thus solved 
by a policy of exclusion; and 

Whereas, The systematic colonization by the 
Orientals of our insular territory in the Pacific, 
and the threatened and partly accomplished ex- 
tension of that system to the Pacific Coast and 
other western localities of the United States, 
constitutes a standing danger, not only to the 
domestic peace, but to the continuance of friend- 
ly relations between the nations concerned; 
therefore be it 

Resolved, By the California State Federation 
of Labor, in Thirteenth Annual Convention as- 
sembled, this 10th day of October, 1912, that 
the terms of the Chinese Exclusion Act should 
be enlarged and extended so as to permanently 
exclude from the United States and its insular 
territory all races native of Asia other than 
those exempted by the present terms of that 
Act; further 

Resolved, That these resolutions be submitted 
through the proper channels to the Congress of 
the United States, with a request for favorable 
consideration and action by that body. 

To Prohibit Towing of Log Rafts. 

That the towing of log rafts along the Pacifii 
Coast is regarded as a menace to navigation by 
other workers as well as seamen is made clear 



by the unanimous adoption of the following 
resolution: 

Whereas, The towing of log rafts along the 
Pacific Coast is a menace to navigation and 
greatly increases the danger to lives of all who 
travel by water; therefore be it 

Resolved, By the California State Federation 
of Labor, in Thirteenth Annual Convention as- 
sembled, at San Diego, October 7-12, 1912, that 
we urge upon our Senators and Congressmen 
to use their best endeavor towards the enact- 
ment of legislation prohibiting the towing of 
said rafts. * 

Appreciation for Assistance Rendered. 

The following statement was submitted to the 
convention by the fourteen delegates represent- 
ing the maritime organizations of the Pacific 
Coast who were represented at Labor's conclave 
in San Diego: 

The undersigned delegates from the maritime 
unions affiliated with this Federation, herewith 
extend to the Federation sincere thanks for the 
assistance so generously rendered in promoting 
the passage of the Seamen's bill by the House 
of Representatives. Your help has been of the 
greatest benefit. The passage of the bill was 
opposed most vigorously by the beneficiaries of 
the present law, and if it had not been for the 
whole-hearted support of the Labor Movement 
it is very probable that the bill would have met 
with defeat in the House. 

The bill will come up for action in the Senate 
in the next session, and it is expected that its 
opponents will leave no stone unturned to de- 
feat it. We therefore respectfully urge upon all 
delegates to continue supporting the bill until 
its final passage. 

Signed by the delegates representing: 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION, 

I. N. HYI.EN, 
HERMAN TVEDT. 

BAY AND RTVRR STEAMBOATMEN OF 
CALIFORNIA, 

HENRY HUNTSMAN. 

MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC, 

MICHAEL McHALE. 

.M.\RINE FIRICMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC, 

JOHN CLARK, 
JOSEPH CONNOLLY, 
C. J. HARRINGTON, 
WM. MEEHAN. 

S.MLORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC, 

ED. ANDERSEN, 

K. ELLISON, 

E. A. ERICKSON, 

P. C. H. MEYER. 

HARRY OHLSEN, 

PAUL SCHARRENBERG. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



BRITISH SEAMEN IN CONFERENCE. 



The Annual Cencral .Meetiui;- of the 
Xational Sailors' and Firemen's Union of 
r.reat Britain and Ireland met in Poplar 
Town Hall, London, oil September 23, 
General President Wilson in the chair. 

Sixty-three delegates were present, rep- 
resenting every part of the British Islands 
and the Continental district (embracing 
TTamhurg, Rotterdam and Antwerp). The 
General President. Joseph Ilavelock WW- 
son. in his report, made a strong plea for 
the utmost diligence in the work of or- 
ganization, lie pointed out that while the 
prospects of securing further improve- 
ments are good, everything depends upon 
the position of the union, numerically and 
financially, when the time for action ar- 
rives. He called attention to the present 
prosperous condition of the shipping trade, 
freights being in some instances fifty and 
seventy-five per cent, higher than a few 
vears ago, and expressed the belief, based 
upon conversation with several prominent 
shipowners, that the latter would be will- 
ing to consider a request for a further in- 
crease of wages in the course of a few 
months. It was necessary, therefore, that 
every effort be made to place the union 
in a position to take advantage of the 
opportunity likely to arise in the near 
future. 

The General President laid strong em- 
phasis upon the necessity of vigorous ac- 
tion for the enactment of a manning scale. 
Discussing the operation of the National 
Insurance Act, it was reported that the 
union has now enrolled 24,600 members 
in its "Approved Society." 

Messages of greeting were read from 
the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, Marine 
Cooks and Stewards' Association of the 
Pacific, and Lake Seamen's Union.- The 
reading of these greetings was received 
with cheers. 

The fraternal delegate from the United 
States was introduced and addressed the 
meeting. The delegate expressed the 
good wishes of the American seamen and 
pledged the support of the International 
Seamen's Union of America in the work 
of the British seamen. 

Upon a motion to tender a vote of 
thanks to the fraternal delegate a number 
of addresses were made, in which the 
speakers voiced their pleasure in receiving 
the representative of the American seamen, 
coupled with the hope that the exchange 
of fraternal visits will bring about the 
closest possible relations between the sea- 
men of the two countries. 

The vote of thanks Avas given rising, 
accompanied with cheers. 

At the second day's session W. L. 
Cartledge, of the Atlantic Coast Marine 
Cooks and Stewards' Union, was intro- 
duced. Comrade Cartledge addressed the 
meeting and explained the conditions ex- 
isting in his locality. 

The chief business of the meeting con- 
sisted in revising the Rules of the union. 
A number of changes were made. The 
composition of the Executive Council was 
changed so as to give larger representa- 
tion to the members resident in the re- 
spective districts. The adhesive stamp 
sA'stem of receipts for contriliutions fducs) 
was adopted. 

A propo.sition was made to include in 



the "( 'bjects of the Union" the following: 
"To promote legislation with a view to 
•secure the nationalization of the mercantile 
marine." This proposition was defeated 
l)y a large majority. 

Considerable discussion took place upon 
a proposal to equalize dues as between 
those members now paying 4d. and those 
paying 6d. per week. It was suggested 
that the dues should be fixed at 6d. per 
week for all members. 

This proposition was defeated, it being 
shown that certain other organizations 
admit seamen at 3d. and 4d. per week. 
Seamen carrying cards in these organiza- 
tions insist upon the right to sail with 
members of the National Union. It was 
also shown that many old seamen work 
on ships in the docks, who by reason of 
the casual nature of their employment are 
unable to pay the higher rate of dues. 
The meeting expressed the sense that 
everything possible should be done to get 
into the National Union all men who go to 
sea in any capacity. 

A resolution to issue an official paper 
was carried. 

London was chosen as the next place 
of meeting. 

The business of the meeting closed with 
the election of officers and a vote of thanks 
to the chaifman. 

On the night of the 23rd the annual 
dinner took place at the Holborn restau- 
rant. Comrade Wilson acted as toastmas- 
ter. In addition to the delegates and visi- 
tors to the annual general meeting there 
were present a number of shipowners, in- 
cluding Sir Walter Runciman. Mr. C. F. 
Torrey and Mr. Townshead. These gen- 
tlemen and several others, including the 
writer, responded to toasts. An interest- 
ing feature of the evening was the sing- 
ing by all hands of a number of chanties, 
which were rendered with true tall-water 
gusto. 

After the close of the general meeting, 
on the 26th. a great mass meeting of sea- 
men was held in Canning Town Public 
Hall, in the vicinity of Victoria Docks. 
The meeting was preceded by a street 
parade. The members in the respective 
districts of London assembled at the 
branch quarters and marched with bands 
and banners to the place of meeting. 

The Tower Hill division was headed by 
the Stars and Stripes, which were fre- 
f|uently cheered by the spectators in the 
densely crowded thoroughfares of the East 
End. It goes without saying that the 
American flag is not seen every day on 
the streets of London. The flags of 
Belgium and France were also carried in 
this division. 

Comrade Wilson, who presided, pre- 
sented the following resolution : 

"That this meeting of Sailors and Fire- 
men of the port of London is of the opin- 
ion that the time has arrived when a 
Manning Scale for all British shij^s and 
for foreign ships arriving at and departing 
from ports in the United Kingdom or 
British ports abroad shall be instituted, 
either by agreement between the shipown- 
ers and the seamen, or by statutory enact- 
ment, and pledges itself to support the 
Executive Council of the National Sailors' 
and Firemen's Union in their endeavors to 
establish such Manning Scale." 

Comrades Cathery, Hanson, Jackson. 



'I'u; per .lu.i the writer spoke to the reso- 
lution. I he speakers \-oiccd the demand 
for four additional men on each vessel, two 
on deck and tAvo in the fire-room. Com- 
rade Wilson, in his opening address, stated 
the union's position that no fireman should 
be required to work more than two and 
one-half tons of coal per day in tropical 
latitudes, or three tons in temperate cli- 
mates. 

The resolution was adoptetl bv a unani- 
mous show of haiifls. amid great enthu- 
siasm. 

During the evening a number of songs 
were sung by the audience. Following 
are the first and last verses of "An In- 
ternational of the Sea": 

Seamen, Firemen, of all Nations, 

You who plough the mighty deep; 
;\re you men or are you cattle. 

\\'ide awake, or deeji in sleep? 
\\'hilst the workers all around you 

Fight the fight for liberty, 
A\'on't you up and join the conflict. 

Fighting with them to be free? 
* * * * 

Slecjjers wake, a voice is calling, 

"Tis the voice of Liberty. 
Forward, boys, and join your t^nion. 

Say, "By God. we WILL be free! 
\fi more bondage, no more bleeding, 

Xo more 'sweat of agony'; 
Christ! We'll wake up! Christ! We'll 
p^y up ; 

Christ! \\'e'll do it willingly!" 

Walter Macartiu'R. 
T.ondnn. Sept. 27. 1912. 



It is now regarded as practically cer- 
tain that the proposal for a trade-union 
])ank in Great Britain on co-operative lines 
will take definite shape shortly. A scheme 
has now been i)repared, and all the neces- 
sary formalities have been gone through 
for the registration of the concern under 
the Companies and I'lanking Acts. A 
managing director aufl a secretary have 
been api)ointed. It is pro])osed that the 
bank shall be run entirelv on co-operative 
lines, and its chief business will be to 
accumulate the reserve funds of the trade- 
union movement, amounting to between 
,f30,000.000 and $35,000,000, with an an- 
nual turnover of about $2.S,000.000. The 
bank will be crmducted on the same lines 
as an ordinary bank, save that its profits 
will be distril)uted amongst the trade- 
unions wliich hdlil the stock ;ind are cus- 
tomers of the concern. 



According to the Union of .Si)onge Fish- 
cries the siKinging industry of Cuba is 
dwindling because fishermen gather in the 
little sponges before their time. The first 
half of the current year the business done 
amounted to $50,000 — a third of what it 
should have been. Some suppose that this 
shriidcage in business is due to the big 
slonns of 1''10. but the union proposes 
t(i inform the imlixidua! fisherman who 
entertains tiiat eriDueous untion — demon- 
strating to him the fact that it is, instead, 
the gathering of little sponges which does 
tile damage. 'I'hese small sponges are 
])eddled especially in Havana. 



At the close of 1911 tlicrc were 1.5?>R 
seeders, 4,471 reajjers and binders, 2,698 
thrashing machines, 2,509 portable engines, 
1,060 hay presses, 1,022 cream separators, 
and 3,238 fanning mills in use in Chile. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Canada's Labor Congress. 

The report of the secretary-treasurer at 
the" recent meeting of the Dominion Trades 
and Labor Congress showed receipts dur- 
ing- the last year of $LS,699.79, and expen- 
ditures of $10,219.(S2, the membership pay- 
ing per capita tax being 66,128, in addition 
to which there are two provincial federa- 
tions of labor and forty-four trades and 
labor councils. During the year five of 
the latter were chartered, as well as seven 
federal unions, and the membership in- 
creased 8869. A resolution was passed by 
the Congress condemning the Lemieux act, 
provided it turns out in the future that 
judicial decisions under the act similar to 
that rendered by a judge in the Province 
of Nova Scotia, determining that feeding 
starving men on strike is contrary to the 
act. President Watters had no opposition 
for re-election. P. M. Draper was re- 
elected secretary-treasurer. John P>ruce, 
of Toronto, was elected fraternal delegate 
to the next convention of the American 
Federation of Labor, and P. M. Draper 
was elected fraternal delegate to the Brit- 
ish Trade Union Congress. Montreal se- 
cured the meeting of the Congress for next 
vear. During the meeting of the Congress 
"the manifesto of the Socialist party of 
Canada," says the Toronto Lance, "was 
distributed in the hall, but as the pamphlets 
did not bear the union label the conven- 
tion unanimously voted to throw it out." 
The Congress voted to give the president 
of the Congress a salary of $1800 a year, 
exclusive of traveling expenses. The con- 
vention, as a whole, was successful, with 
a good delegate attendance. 



Probing Living Cost. 

.'\ board of naval ofificers has been ap- 
pointed by the commandant of the Wash- 
ington Navy Yard and is at work to de- 
termine the real facts regarding the em- 
ployes' petition to Congress for an increase 
in pay on the grounds of the high cost of 
living. The wage scale of the navy yard 
employes is based, to a large extent, upon 
the prevailing scale in the immediate indus- 
trial territory in which the yard is located. 
The industrial section, as applied to Wash- 
ington, includes Baltimore, Philadelphia, 
and other cities. The board is making in- 
quiries into the cost of living in these cities 
and will compare them with the cost of 
living in the navy 3fard district of Wash- 
ington. Upon the completion of the 
board's investigation it is expected that a 
raise will be granted. 



Kier Hardie on Unions. 

Before a large audience in Columbus, O., 
recently, J. Kier Hardie, a Socialist mem- 
ber of the British Parliament, among other 
things, made this statement, and it is in- 
teresting in view of the fact that many 
liolitical enthusiasts discredit the trade un- 
ions wherever it is possible to do so. "I 
am told — I have not heard it yet myself, 
remember — but I am told tliat in some 
parts of these States, just as in some parts 
of Europe, there are men that are Social- 
ists who seek to belittle trade unionism 
or labor unionism. I say to you that the 



man who seeks to belittle the trade union 
is no friend of yours ; that all the progress 
which the working class has made hitherto 
has been through their labor unions. The 
strike, my friends, has been the weapon; 
fear of the strike and the strength which 
union gives has been the weapon which 
has brought whatever improvement has 
been secured by the working class of the 
world. Therefore, do not let any one 
mislead you into a belief that the day of 
the union is over. It is not over. It is 
the very foundation upon which the whole 
superstructure of industrial liberty will one 
(lav be reared." 



Bars Conciliators. 

In a letter addressed to Judge Martin A. 
Knapp, of the United States Commerce 
Court and Charles P. Neill, United States 
Commissioner of Labor, recently made pub- 
lic. General Manager S. C. Long of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad placed the company 
on record as against treating with a com- 
mittee from the Order of Railroad Tele- 
graphers in the matter of wage adjust- 
ments. The letter denied the existence of 
any situation which would justify the ac- 
ceptance of the offices of the Federal of- 
ficials named as mediators, as requested by 
the Order of Railroad Telegraphers seeking 
arbitration under the Erdman Act. The 
company states it is already treating with 
one organization of telegraphers. The 
Pennsylvania Railroad is the sponsor for 
an alleged organization of telegraphers 
which belongs to the company in fee sim- 
])le. This organization was founded, of 
course, in order to fight the legitimate or- 
ganization of the Order of Railroad Tele- 
graphers, the company organization being 
nothing more or less than a paper organ- 
ization. Therefore, the railroad company 
lakes the position "that in view of the fact 
that the company is on the pomt of giving 
satisfactory reply to a committee repre- 
senting the employes of the telegraph de- 
])artment the company declines to treat 
with two committees representing the same 
class of employes." The Order of Rail- 
road Telegraphers have not as yet taken 
anv (lefmite action in the matter. 



Unions Pay Dividends. 

By reducing the report of Secretary 
Frank Duffy to the convention of the Uni- 
ted Brotherhood of Carpenters to definite 
accomplishments, it is a revelation. While 
it is impossible to reach an absolutely ac- 
curate result, yet the report is not difficult- 
of approximation. Nearly all of the local 
unions have reported an increase in wages 
and shortening of hours wherever this re- 
sidt has been attainefl. Trade movements 
of the carpenters have been general, and in 
amplifying the report it is found that in 
a large number of cities there has been 
an average increase in the dail}' wage, 
taking into consideration the shortening 
of hours without reduction in pay, of 38.4 
cents. On an approximated membership 
of 200,000 this yields an advance in wages 
of $76,800 per day. Computed on 309 
working days in the year, this increase 
(Contiiutcfl on Page 11.) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



International Seamen's Union of Anieriea, 570 
West Lake St., Chicago, III. 

Atlantic District. 

Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union, 51 South St.. 
New York, N. Y. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
Atlantic, 42 South St., New York. 

Inland Seamen's Union, Whitehall, New York. 

Harbor Boatmen's Union, 214 West St., New 
York, N. Y. 

Lake District. 

Lake Seamen's Union, 570 West Lake St., 
Chicago, 111. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Great Lakes, 71 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Union of Great 
Lakes, 55 Main St., Bufifalo, N. Y. 
Pacific District. 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 44-46 East St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
the Pacific, 91 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of the 
Pacific, 51 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Alaska Fishermen's Union, 93 Steuart St San 
I'rancisco, Cal. ' 

United Fishermen of Pacific, Box 42, Seattle 
Wash. ' -^"^'''^"=' 

Bay and River Steamboatmen's Union, 51 
Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia- 
/9 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W 
1. Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 
Queens Chambers, Wellington N Z 
Palmerston BIdg., Auckland, N Z 
Carniigton, Newcastle, N. S W 
Maritime Rldg., Melbourne, Victoria 
Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 
25 Arcade, Brisbane, Queensland 
Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 
VVharf Rockhampton, Queensland 
Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland 
Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland 
1 atriot Office, Dundaberg, Queensland. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Road, London E 
England. 

Hull Seamen's and Firemen's Union 1 Rail- 
way St., Hull. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, Dubois- 
stiaat 12, Antwerp, Belgium. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband Eneel- 
ufer 21, Berlin P. O. 16, Germany. 

FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts Mantimes de France, Marseille 11 Place 
de la Joliette. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Quay Videcog, Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Sjomands Forbund, 15 Rosenberg gar- 
den, liergen, Norway. 

SWEDEN. 

Svcnska-Sjonu-ns-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, I'unnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Kobenhavn, Toldbod- 
gade 15, Denmark. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, Kobenhavn, St. An- 
napalads 22, Denmark. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansl)ond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 

ITALY, 

Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Gcnova, Tiazza L. Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 

AUSTRIA. 

Verhand der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
bciter und Arbeiterinnen Cesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Boschetlo 5, Austria. 

SPAIN. 

!'"ederacion Nacional de Obcreros de Mar de 
liuijues V puerto, Barcelona Mayor, 44, 2, 1 
( I'.areeloneta), Spain. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad de Rcsistencia de Fognistas, Monte- 
video, Calle 25 de Agosto No. 219, Uruguay. 

ARGENTINA. 

Federacion Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), P.nrnos Aires. Olavarria 363 (Altos). 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Melbourne workers are publicly 
protesting against State-aided immi- 
gration and calling on the Govern- 
ment to commence public works in 
order to relieve existing depression. 
Two wharf laborers were up be- 
fore the Industrial Court in Sydney 
(N. S.) recently, and were fined £2 
each on a charge of going on strike. 
Two other men up before the same 
court were fined £5 each for in- 
citing to strike. 

Strikebreakers are being intro- 
duced into Spain to take the places 
of the railroad men who recently 
left work and especially tied up the 
whole of the traffic in Catalonia. 
Nearly 100 ship engineers arrived to- 
day at Barcelona from Melilla and 
other ports to take charge of the 
locomotives. The strike is spreading 
throughout the north of Spain. 

In Leipzig, Germany, they give 
the doctor his weekly rest day, and 
it is proposed to adopt it in Berlin. 
In Leipzig it is applied not only to 
Sundays but also to holidays. The 
city is divided into several large 
districts, in each of which a per- 
son requiring medical attention on a 
Sunday can ascertain from a police- 
man or a chemist, and even from 
the newspapers, the name and ad- 
dress of the doctor on duty in his 
neighborhood. 

The wage-earners of Sweden, Nor- 
way and Denmark are having splen- 
did success in forming an interna- 
tional federation for offensive and 
defensive purposes. In case a cer- 
tain percentage of workers are forced 
on strike or lockout in any one 
country they are to be supported 
morally and financially by the other 
countries. Should a military war be 
declared at any time by the ruling 
class, general strikes will be called to 
paralyze the governments. 

The South African Miners' Phthi- 
sis bill sweeps away fi.xed contribu- 
tions and creates a phthisis insurance 
fund, to which, after the Act comes 
into operation, each underground 
worker must pay sixpence in the 
pound of his monthly earnings. The 
employer has to provide an equiva- 
dent sum during these first two 
years; after that time he must sub- 
scribe towards the fund at the rate 
of one shilling and sixpence in the 
pound on all amounts paid by him 
to white employes underground. 

The British Amalgamated Society 
of Railway Servants, which led the 
strike of a year ago for a better- 
ment of the condition of railway 
workers, has finally reaped its re- 
ward. Under the amended railway 
conciliation scheme complete settle- 
ments have been made with most of 
the railway systems. The increase 
in wages granted aggregates ap- 
proximately $10,000,000 per year, be- 
sides the reduction of hours secured 
in many branches of the railway 
service. 

The industries of the State of 
Washington cause an average of one 
death for every working day and 
1000 accidents of various kinds a 
month, according to fi^gures compiled 
by the State Industrial Insurance 
Commission, which has completed its 
first year of active service. During 
the year there were 12,000 accidents 
and 312 deaths. The commission 
collected $980,445 from employers and 
paid claims amounting to $445,527. 
Of the balance of $534,918, $243,984 
is in reserve to meet pensions that 
have been allowed. 



Cannon's Clothing Store 

Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

Special Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

Men's Suits Made to Order 
515 FRONT-516 BEACON STS. .... SAN PEDRO 



M. BROWIN 

THE SAN FRANCISCO CLOTHING STORE AND OUTFITTER 

EXCLUSIVE AGENT FOR 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

427 I^ROINX STREET SA.-N PEDRO 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Angeles Beers 
All goods sold at lowest San Francisco prices. We buy direct from Kentucky 
Distilleries and our California Wineries. Seafaring men invited to inspect our stock. 
Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

clStHesTm 

Tailored to SUIT YOU at a reasonable price is what you get 
when you leave your order with 

S. G. SWANSON 

641 SOUTH BEACON STREET 
Next door to the Postoffice San Pedro, California 

Union Label Tailoring and satisfied customers is our best advertisement. 
NOTICE — Why not you, be one of our pleased patrons. Blue serges and 
the season's late styles in woolens always to be found here. 




UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 



When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
him. Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 

MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



^^Giife^^ 



WILL BE A MOTHER TO YOU 
Fix your clothes, sew the rips, re- 
pair the tears, fasten the buttons, etc. 
We really clean your clothes by our 

French Dry Cleaning Process 

which is entirely different from the 

mere "sponging and pressing" method. 

We Call and Deliver 

The French Dye WorKs 

612 BEACON STREET 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Martin Qlsen, height 6 feet, weight 
225 pounds, missing since Christmas, 
is inquired for by Riggers' and 
Stevedores' Union, Steuart and Fol- 
som streets, San Francisco. 

John Moen, born 1878 in Norway, 
height 6 feet, is inquired for by his 
father, John Olson Moen, of Lansing, 
Iowa. 

Ole Jenson Lovig (sometimes writ- 
ten Qluf Jenson Lovig), a native of 
Norway, born at Stavanger, Hogs 
ijords; about 54 years old; height, 5 
feet, 9 inches; weight, about 170 
pounds; light complexion; blue eyes; 
last seen at Vancouver, B. C, in 1905. 
Any one able to give any information 
kindly communicate with his brother, 
Jonas Lovig, No. 2414J/J 30th St., 
Tacoma, Wash. 

Charles S. Barker, born near St. 
Peter, Nicollet County, Minn., wishes 
to hear from his father, Charles Wm. 
Barker, who left Brookings County, 
S. D., for Oregon, and was going 
sailing again in 1889, and was last 
heard from in Coos County, Ore. Is 
fond of hunting and trapping; has 
been master; sailed out of New York 
City and Boston. Age about 80; 
height about 6 feet; bald headed, 
eyes gray, hair dark. 



San Pedro News Co. 

Sixth and Beacon Streets, San Pedro, Cal. 

Dealers in 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Agents 

Harbor Steam Laundry 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



The United States Shipping Com- 
missioner at Philadelphia, Pa., re- 
quests the following named seamen to 
communicate with him: Gust Leyrle, 
arrived at Philadelphia, October 2, 
1908, on ship Dirigo; Gustav Mattson 
and Victor Wilson, on schooner 
Charles Davenport, March, 1911. 

George Albert Vaughan, aged 47, 
of Handsworth, Birmingham, Eng- 
land. Was in New York city in 1902; 
worked as steward on New York and 
South American boats. Important. 
Address, Rev. R. C. Cookson, 96 
Monroe street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Herman Bjorckbom Eknas, a na- 
tive of Finland, born 1874, is inquired 
for by his orother Evert. Address, 
Sailors' Union, San Francisco. 

Alexander Benson, native of St. 
John, N. F., last heard of in Canada, 
now supposed to be on the Pacific 
Coast, is urgently inquired for by his 
mother. Address, Mrs. A. Benson, 
King's Bridge, St. John's, N. F. 

John West, who was on the 
steamer Horatius in June, 1912, is 
inquired for by P. Ivers, River Dar- 
ling, via Wenthwonh, Australia. 
Please notify Sup't., No. 1 State 
street. New York. 

The United States Shipping Com- 
missioner, at New York, is desirous 
of locating the relatives or heirs of 
James Clark, a native of Maine, born 
1854. The deceased has a balance of 
$41.10 due him. 



San Pedro Letter Lut. 

.\ntrosen, Karla Larson, Laurlts 

Anderson. Otto -1738Larsen. Einar A. 
Airo, Oscar Larson. Louis -1008 

Andersen, Ben. Latz, K. 

Anderson, J. -1099 Larsen, C. 
Anderson, Victor Michel, Bertheli 

-1630 Moulas. Nick 

Alexandersen, P. Meyer, William 
Andree, E. A. -1410 Malmgren, Eric 
Aspe, T. Machada, Enrique 

.\nderson, O. Mikeleit, E. (Reg. 

Anderson, Gust -1534 Letter) 
Anderson, S. Mark. Frank 

Anderson, Fred Markman, H. 

Anderson, J. G. Mauchada, Henry 

Andersen, Harald McGuire, Owen T. 
Brusbard, Ewald Mattson, J. -1388 
Bengtsson. C. -1924 Markwardt, Carl 

Beyerle, Rupert Murphy, Ambrose 
BohnhoSr, Harry Matisen, Hendrik 

Benson, Charlie Mellerup. Jens 

Bredberg, Henry Matsen Hemming A. 

Ban, Martin Nordman. John D. 
Bredesen, John Nilsen, Anders 

Berg. H. Y. Nelsen, C. J. 

Bulander, B. B. Nutman, Harry 

Bergman, E. Nielsen. P. W. 

Bloom Frank A. Nordman, Jon 
Bodahl, Hans -1746 Nielsen, Alf -1054 

Boardsen, Ed. Nurken. Herman 

Broders. Hajo Nordstrom. Ben 

Buchtman, F. Nystrom, Ragnar E. 

Conners, Jack Nelson, Nils S. 

Clausen, J. Nelson, Anton 

Carlsson, A. -1220 Nelsson. Emil -552 

Christensen. H. P. Norman, L. 

Carlson, Dick Nielsen, Sivert 

Christophersen, R. Nelson, Nils 

Doyle. William Olson. P. 

Paugul, Alfred Olsen, Nick 

ICiistrom, Karl Olsen, Wm. 

lullis. Jack Olsson, Hans 794 

Edgerton. Jack Olssen. H. -714 

Eichel. Erlck Olsen, Martin 

Ellingsen, Eduard Olsen, O. P. -1141 

Edwards, Walter Owen, Fred 

Erickson, Edward Olsen. George 

Frandsen, L. M. Osterhahn. J. W. 

Fasig, Don Peron. Edmund 

Glencross, Harry Petterson, Viggo 
Guthre, Raymond -1322 

Gusek, B. Peterson. Henry 

Green. Frank Peterson, Olof (Reg. 
Glasse. Gust. Lr.) 

Geiger, Joseph Pedersen. Peder 

Gotz, Rudolf Potet, Emile 

Gustafson, J. Peterson. Loul 

GroBzewski. Fritz Peterson, Patrick 

H.iort. Knud Pommer. John 

Ilellnius. Oscar Petrich. Theodor 

Hannus. Alex Penningrud. L. 

Halto. Waine Rasmussen. Arthur 

Hoft, Hans Richardson, E. E. 

Hakonsen. John Reuter. Charles 

Hansen, Berger Rajala, Victor 

Hendenskog, John Retal. F. O. 

Hart. Philip Risbeck. Gustav 

Holgren, G. J. Rasmussen. Rasmus 
Hendorsen. V. -1631Remerd. J. 

Ilalvorsen. H. -595 Rutter, Fritz 

House. James E. Swensen. C. E. 

Haggar, F. W. Stammerjohan, Hans 

Ingebretsen. Ingolf Sorensen. J. 

Jones. Auber B. Selking. Ben 

Jones. Harry Schafer. Ernest 

Jones. Arthur Signard, Walter 

Jersh, Billy Schmid. John -2579 

Johnson. Gunnar Schmid. F. 

.rrnsen. J. Frank Sassl. Wilhelm 

Johnson. Arthur Scott. Ed. 

•Tohanssen. Fritz Sorensen. Michael 

Johnsen. Walter Sandstrom. Ivar 
Johnssen. C. -2016 Strahle. Chas. 
Jacobsen. John (Reg. Letter) 

Johnson. Ole Sides. William 

Jacobsen. Anders Sievers, G. 

.lohansson. A. -1874 Schmid. J. 

.rohnson. Axel J. Swanson. Julius 

Jonassen. C. Sasson. John 

Jolinsen. John Smith, Henry 

Johnson, Axel Smith, J. S. 

Johnsen. J. K. -1715 Smith. John V. 
Johnson. O. (Capt. Svanson. Ben 

Starr, Reg. Lrr.) Tammi, Emll 

Irwin, Robert Tomsen. Peder 

Kohlmelster. O. Thorn. Arvid 

Klaessen. Karl A. Tollefsen. R. 

Karlsen. Jacob ' Torbjornsen. Andrew 

Kumm. Chas. V. Thorsen, J. 

Kopatz. Oscar Togersen. Anton 

Kern. Max Wilson. Harry 

Kllman. Gunnar Ward, H. 

Karlson. R. Ulappa, Kostl 

Kuhne. W. Wahrenberg. Otto 

Kerleau. Alex Ziebel. Albert 
Kosze, Franz (Reg.Zoe. Francois 

L.) Tounggren. E. 
Lundmark. Helge PHOTOS AND 

I^arson, Martin -1710 PACKAGES. 

Lewis. George H. Mikeleit, E. 

Larsen. Martin Axelscn, W. 

Lange. Ingolf de Boy. Geo. 

Ludewig, Edmond Kees. L. 

I-pino, Fred Manners, C. 

Lister, W. Schroeder. Ernst 



^^^^AA^^W>^^^V%^^*%^^.^^'VW>^>^N*%i'>^N^V^'S.«^*^ 



YOU NEED NOT BE BROKE 
WHEN IN SAN PEDRO 

I buy and sell new and second- 
hand goods that have any value. 

I also do Gun and Locksmithing, 
Upholstering and Mattress Making. 

N. MANN 

335 BEACON STREET, San Pedro 
Near 4th Street 



INFORMi'TION WANTED. 

Emanuel Nyrecn. a native of Abo, 
Finland, was member of crew of 
revenue-cutter Dexter, in 1908. Please 
communicate H. H. Rohrbach, New- 
ton Theological Institute, New Cen- 
ter, Mass. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



Gold in excess of $1,250,000 reached Seattle 
on October 5 on the Nome steamship Senator. 
Of the total, $800,000 is consigned by Wells- 
Fargo Express to the San Francisco mint. 

Bringing 6409 tons of coal to the United 
States Government the British steamer Ockley, 
Captain Barrett, arrived at San Francisco on 
October 8, sixty-eight days from Norfolk. 

D. C. Jacklin, a Salt Lake mining man, has 
awarded to the Seattle Construction and Dry- 
dock Company the contract for the construction 
of a $250,000 steel yacht 212 feet long and to be 
completed by June 1. 

The overdue British steamer Northumbria, 
Captain Hedley, 24 days from Muroran, Japan, 
arrived at San Diego on October 6. When 10 
days out from Muroran the steamer encountered 
terrific gales, wliich carried away part of its 
upper works. 

The steam schooner Hardy, Captain Michael- 
son, which struck on the bar while crossing out 
at Coos Bay a few days ago, reached San Fran- 
cisco on October 3. As a result of the mishap 
the vessel lost 75,000 feet of her deckload of 
lumber and 221 drums. 

The lumber shipments from Tacoma during 
Scptemlier totaled 9,177,844 feet, and the pros- 
pects are that the present month will greatly 
exceed this figure. The coastwise sliipments of 
the month were 3.797,296 feet, wliile the foreign 
shipments were 5,280,548 feet. 

The last steamer for Dawson left White 
Horse, Y. T., on October 8, and will tie up on 
her return to White Horse. Other boats in the 
Upper Yukon wiU go into winter quarters on 
reaching White Horse, and during the next 
seven months travel along the great river will 
be by stage and dog team. 

The St. Michael, the last steamer from Daw- 
son, Y. T., for Fairbanks, Alaska, left the 
Klondike port on September 26. She will winter 
at Fairbanks. For more than seven months the 
people of the Yukon Valley will have no con- 
nection with the busy world, except by dog 
sled and horse stage lines. 

The United States naval supply ship Supply 
sailed from Seattle on October 6 from the Puget 
Sound navy yard for Guam, where it will be 
stationed indefinitely. The Supply will put in at 
San Francisco, to which port it will convoy the 
new Seattle-built submarine F-3, which is going 
south to join the submarine flotilla. 

The old American ship Two Brothers, which 
was built at Farmingdale. Me., in 1868, is to be 
converted into a floating cannery for use in 
northern waters. The move to change the Two 
Brothers into this type of vessel was made be- 
cause of the success of the old Glory of the 
Seas, which was similarly fitted as an experi- 
ment last season. 

Three miles oflf Point Montara in a north- 
west gale, the steamer Curacao, Captain Harris, 
picked up the power fishing boat Santa Rosa 
and rescued the crew of four men on October 
3. The Santa Rosa was leaking badly when 
overtaken by the steamer, the deck planks had 
opened and the craft was taking water rapidly. 

New steamers are now building for the Aus- 
tralian oversea and coast trade, representing an 
aggregate of 230,000 tons. They include some 
of tlie finest liners that have ever been seen in 
Australian waters. The number of new vessels 
is twenty-eight. Others are planned by differ- 
ent companies. The opening of the Panama 
Canal in October, 1913, is largely responsible 
for this activity. 

In a leaking condition the schooner Sophie 
Christensen from Puget Sound for Callao ar- 
rived at Honolulu on October 4. The schooner 
will be repaired at the island port before pro- 
ceeding on her trip to South America. August 
i'th this schooner was reported as having put 
into Papeete in a leaking condition. No par- 
ticulars of the condition of the schooner have 
been received. 

The sloop Pilgrim, with a crew of five men, 
m.issed the Newport (Or.) channel when going 
in on October 5 and was turned over by a 
roller. Every man on board was lost. They 
were J. W. McKenzie. Captain Claud Tonner, 
Tarld Laffson, Forest Wooster and a boy named 
Henry. The life-saving crew crossed to South 
Beach, and. after some effort, brought the 
Pilgrim to shore, but all that was found on her 
was a hat, coat and sweater. 

After an absence of several years the royal 
mail liner Moana of the Union Steamship Com- 
pany arrived at San Francisco on October 3 
from Australia and New Zealand via the South 
Sea Island ports of call of Raratonga and 
Papeete. She is taking the place of the ATanuka, 
which is now on the run between the British 
colonies, and is due for her annual survey. 
Years ago the Moana plied in the old service 
between San Francisco and the .\ntipodes. 

The British steamer Strathallan, now at Hono- 
lulu, has been chartered by Davis & Fehon to 
load liunher for .Australia, taking a part cargo 
of redwood from Noyo, Cal., and completing at 
Portland or Everett. When at Nanaimo, before 
voyaging to Australia, from where the vessel is 
now returning, two Chinese members of the 
crew escaped and the steamer had to pay $1000 



fine to the customs. At Melbourne another 
Chinese escaped and Captain Scorrer was fined 
$500. 

Alleging violation of United States customs 
laws, the gasoline schooner May was seized at 
the wharf at San Diego by Walter T. Blake, 
Collector of Customs at that port, under in- 
structions from Special Agent F. W. Johnson 
of Los Angeles. A specific charge against the 
May is landing a gasoline engine at San Pedro 
in February and failing properly to enter port 
or notify the customs authority. The May is 
also suspected of having been used for carrying 
contraband Chinese. 

The Harrison Direct line announces a change 
in the sailings from the other side. The ves- 
sels have been calling at Antwerp, Glasgow and 
Liverpool in succession for cargo before striking 
across the Atlantic, but hereafter Liverpool will 
be the port of stoppage after Antwerp, Glasgow 
being taken in last because of a new demand 
in the offering of freight. The new freighter 
of the fleet to arrive at San Francisco will be 
the Workman, which is due in a few days at 
San Pedro from Honolulu. 

Twenty passengers of the steam-schooner 
Yosemite were rescued on October 4, ofif the 
Oregon coast, by the steamer Beaver, after 
they had been lowered into lifeboats in a 
treacherous sea. The accident to the Yosemite 
occurred when its rudder was carried away 
while crossing the bar from Grays Harbor on its 
way to San Pedro. For two days the vessel 
rode the heavy seas rudderless, rigged with a 
jury rudder which was rigged by the members 
of the crew. On Thursday the schooner was 
taken in tow. 

The Norwegian steamer August has been taken 
by Balfour, Guthrie & Company to load barley 
here or wheat at Portland, with the option of 
Puget Sound, for the United Kingdom, getting 
a rate of 50 shillings. She will bring ties from 
Japan to California ports before operating on the 
new fixture. The German ship Olona has been 
reported as chartered for a wheat cargo from 
the Columbia River to the United Kingdom. 
She is said to have received 44s. 6d. for De- 
cember loading. This is the highest rate paid a 
windjammer this season, with the exception of 
the British bark Oweenee, which got 45s. 6d. 

Captain Jack Martin, formerly master of the 
steamer Norwood, and Captain P. S. Murchison 
left Hoquiam several days ago for the Atlantic 
Coast to take charge of the new steel steamer 
John M. Hooper, the former as master and the 
latter as mate, to bring her around the Horn to 
Hoquiam. The Hooper has just been completed 
at Delaware shipyards. She is a steel steamer, 
costing $250,000, and will be put on the run 
between Hoquiam and California ports by Sud- 
den & Christensen, the firm for which she was 
built. The Hooper will have passenger accom- 
modations as well as freight, and will be one of 
the finest vessels in the coasting trade from the 
harbor. 

But two more vessels of the big salmon fleet 
are yet to arrive at San Francisco from the 
Alaskan canneries. They are the packets Star 
of Scotland and Star of Holland, bringing large 
cargoes from the most southerly stations. The 
salmon run during the season just closed has 
been the most prosperous in many years, partic- 
ularly for the large corporations in the field, al- 
though the fishermen and cannery hands have 
realized larger "pokes" than usual as a result of 
the extraordinary catch. At some of the sta- 
tions, the fishermen say, they could not get out 
their nets fast enough to catch the fish, which 
almost choked the waters. In addition to being 
a successful season from a financial point of 
view, the year was remarkably free from serious 
mishaps or disasters. 

Captain T. L. Harrison is not afraid of trying 
to achieve what others have declared to be im- 
possible and that is why he was the lone passen- 
ger on the freighter Arizonan sailing for Central 
American ports from San Francisco on Octo- 
ber 13. The object of Captain Harrison's jour- 
ney is to pull into deep water the Kosmos liner 
Kambyscs, which went ashore off the Costa 
Rican coast as many as ten years ago. Ever 
since the breakers have been pounding against 
her steel frame, but, according to the latest re- 
ports, without much of a chance of breaking her 
sturdy back. The Kambyses would be as good 
as new only for the fact that she can't get out 
of her sandy bed to do any steaming in the 
open. Harrison has made thoroughgoing prep- 
arations to raise the sunken monster, and the 
night before sailing he spoke something like 
this to a few of his intimates: "This is a big 
undertaking, the biggest in my life, but you'll see 
me back in this port in a couple of months with 
my ship. She's mine to get and I'm going to 
get her." 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an offi- 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims 
of all seafarers careful attention. 3?4 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg., Third Floor, California St., near 
Montgomery. Telephone, Kearny 394; Home, 
C 3832. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 
and 
INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' FED- 
ERATION. 



THOS. A. HANSON, 
570 West Lake St., Chicago, III. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 51 South St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 1%A Lewis St 
PORTLAND, Me., 377A Fore St 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St 
BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway 
NORFOLK, Va., 221 Water St 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 ContI St 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 535 St. Ann St 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 4 South St. Telephone 1879 

Broad. Night Call 8374 Spring. 
New York Branch, 400 West St. Telephone 5153 
Chelsea. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 258 Commercial St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 53 St. Ann St. 
BALTIMORE. Md., S02-804 South Broadway 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Conti St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION OF NEW YORK 
AND VICINITY. 

Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 214 West St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKES DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, III., 570 West Lake St. 

Branches: 
BUFFALO. N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 21 High St 
CLEVELAND, O., 1401 W. 9th St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
TOLEDO, O.. 54 Main St. 
N. TONA WANDA. N. Y.. 152 Main St 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St 
ERIE, Pa., 107 B. Third St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St, East 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y.. 70 Isabella St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave 
PORT HURON, Mich., 617 Water St 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O., 1185 W. Eleventh St. 
CHICAGO, III., 445 La Salle Ave. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St.. East. 
MILW.AUKEB, Wis., 151 Reed St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis.. 1814 Fourth St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Mnin St., Tel. Seneca 2295. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O., 1401 West Ninth St 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 151 Reed St. 
CHICAGO. III., 314 N. Clark St 
ASHTABULA, O., 74 Bridge St. 
TOLEDO, O.. 54 Main St. 

i?I?'^"J^,9'''V^''^'^' '' "E^st Woodbridge SL 
PT. HURON. Mich.. 517 Water St 
CONNEAUT, O.. 922 Day St 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y.. 70 Isabella St 
N. TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main'st 
SUPERIOR. Wis., 1721 N. Third St 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave 
ERIE. Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 9142 Mackin.iw Ave 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 44-46 East St. 
Branches: 

VICTORIA. B. C. Old Court Rooms, Bastion 
oQuare. 

VANCOUVER. B. C, Labor Temple, Cor. Homer 
and Dunsmuir, P. O. Box 1365. 

TACOMA. Wash., 2218 North 30th St. 

SEATTLE, W.-ish., 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 65. 

PORT TOWNSBND, Wash., 114 Quincy St. P. O. 
Box 48. t ^ , ^ 

ARERDRRN, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 
PORTLAND. Ore., 51 Union Ave., Box 2100 
EUREKA, Cal.. 227 First St., P. O. Box 64 
SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 67 

P^O^'s'^^^'-iU "' '^" ^°^' *^"®^" '^"^ Nuuanu Sts., 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Established in 1887 



WALTER MACARTHUR Editor 

rAfl. SCHARRENBERG Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One venr. l).v mail - $2.00 | Six months - - JlOO 
Advertising Rates on Application. 



Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To insure a prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress all cnmnuinicatlons of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 



Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific. 
44-4S East Street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be 
r.iblisl-ed in the JOURNAI-. provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer s name 
and address. The .lOURNAI. Is not resporislble for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1912. 



SER^^\NTS OF PLUTOCRACY. 

Chinese Humphrey, who at. present mis- 
represents a Coni^ressional District of the 
State of Washington, had one able (?) 
second in the House of Representatives. 

During the debate im the Seamen's l)ill, 
when the fight of "Big Business" was 
made against any reform, Chinese Humph- 
rey, on one occasion, lost his head com- 
pletely l)ecause his defense of the Steel 
Trust, which controls the Lake Carrier's 
Association, was successfully challenged by 
more than one Representative from States 
Ixiidcring on tlie Lakes. At this critical 
moment Mr. McMorran of Michigan 
launched into a defense and eui©^ of the 
Steel Trust and concluded his oration with 
this nnjst remarkable language: 

"I am opposed to this bill. ... I think that 
the steel company are entitled to the credit of 
the efforts they have made in behalf of the 
work of the sailors of the Lakes. They have 
provided every comfort that could be provided 
in good steamers, and I think it comes with ill 
grace from any member on that side of the 
House TO CHARGE THE STEEL TRUST 
WITH BEING UNFAIR TO LABOR." 

\o doubt, Mr. McMorran had in mind 
the '"Welfare" (Hell-Fare) plan which 
the Lake Carriers' Association endeavored 
to substitute for trade-unionism among 
its em])loycs on the Lakes. .^nd this 
leads us to the conclusion that Mr. Mc- 
Morran is either a fool or a tool. If he does 
not know that the Lake Carriers' Associa- 
tion "Welfare" plans are simple, thinly 
disguised attempts of the Steel Trust to 
crush unionism on the Lakes, then he is a 
fool. If he does know and nevertheless 
speaks of the benevolence of the Steel 
Trust, then Mr. M(;Morran must be a tool. 

A few days after the man from Michi- 
gan made the above quoted remarks the 
Stanley Congressional Committee, which 
investigated the methods of the Steel 
Trust, submitted their report. That docu- 
ment, consisting of 346 pages, 6 by 9 inches 
in size, reveals a condition of affairs so 
utterly disgraceful tt> the beneficiaries and 
apologists of that manmiolh monopoly that 



even Chinese Humphrey and his colleague, 
McMorran, ought to shamefully hide their 
faces for the part ihev took in defending 
that concern. 

It is doubtful if this country ever had, 
or ever will have, another combination of 
capital which brought as much poverty, 
injustice and oppression to the workers, as 
did this tariff-fostered monopoly. At any 
rate there is no equal in the history of the 
world for the rapacity and greed exhibited 
l)v those steel magnates who, in piling up 
fabulous riches for themselves, imposed 
upon the toilers who produced their wealth 
indignities worse than slavery. 

The story of the Steel Trust's love and 
affection for the workers is best told in 
that chapter of the Stanley report, entitled 
"Labor L'nions," which reads, in part. ;.s 
follows : 

Tlic attitude of the United States Steel Cor- 
poration toward orf^anized labor was early de- 
termined. On June 17, 1901, six weeks after the 
Steel Corporation was organized and began 
operations, the following resolution was adopted: 
"That we are unalterably opposed to any 
e.Ntension of union labor and advise subsidiary 
companies to take firm position when these 
(|uestions come up and say that they are not 
going to recognize it, that is, any extension of 
unions in mills where they do not now exist; 
that great care should be used to prevent 
trouble and that they promptly report and con- 
fer with this corporation." 

Thereafter the great bulk of .\mcrican union 
laboring men in the iron and steel industry under- 
stood they were not wanted at the works of the 
United States Steel Corporation. The process of 
filling the places of these union laborers is inter- 
esting and important to observe, .\merican labor- 
ers, loyal to their unions, could not be had. Some- 
thing had to be done to get laborers. Southern 
F.urope was appealed to. Hordes of laborers from 
Southern F.urope poured into the United States. 
They were almost entirely from the agri- 
cultural classes, knew absolutely nothing about 
iron and steel manufacture, but were suf- 
ficient to fight the labor unions. They were 
absolutely unskilled, but they could work, es- 
l)ecial!y as common laborer';. In times of 
special necessity even advertisements for for- 
eign help of this cla*;s were spread broadcast. 
.\ sample of these advertisements, which the 
evidence shows were caused to be circulated by 
subsidiary companies of the Steel Corporation, 
is as follows: 

W'anted. — Sixty tin house men, tinners, catch- 
ers, and helpers to work in open shops; Syrians, 
Poles, and Roumanians preferred; steady em- 
ployment and good wages to men willing to 
work; fare paid and no fees charged for this 
work. Central Employment Bureau, 628 Penn- 
sylvania avenue. 

This advertisement appeared, as t.lie evi- 
dence shows, in the Pittsburg Gazette-Times of 
July 14, 1909. (Sec page 3074 of hearings.") 

The result is that about 80 per cent, of the 
inTikilled hiborers in the steel and iron business 
arc foreigners of these classves. With the 
benefit of a skilled .^mcrican foreman such a 
crew can work out results in unskilled labor 
production. The profits of this system of labor 
employment go to the Steel Corporation, while 
the disjjlaced .American workman shifted as 
best he could. 

Following the elimination of union labor, and 
the introduction of the above-(le«cribed foreign 
laborers, an investi.gation was made as to the 
conditions of laborers, hours of labor, home 
life. etc. .Xs to the hours of labor, the evidence 
before the committee was conclusive that long 
hours of labor prevailed in the iron and steel 
industry, especially in the unskilled departments. 
Lender the direction of the United States Com- 
missioner of Labor, a very careful and thorough 
investigation as to the hours of labor in the 
steel industry has been made. From this of- 
ficial report we 'inote without comment. 

During May, 1910, the period covered by this 
investigation into the steel industrv. 50.000 per- 
sons, or 20 per cent, of the l.i3,000 employes 
of the blast furnaces, steel works, and rolling 
nn'lls covered by this report, customarily worked 
seven days per w^eek, and 20 per cent, of 
them worked 84 hours or more a week, which, 
in effect, means a 12-hour working day every 
day in the week, including Sunday. 

This hardship of 12-hour days and a 7-day 
week is still further increased by the fact that 
every week or two weeks, as the case may be, 
when the employes on the day shift are trans- 
ferred to the night shift, and ^■ioe versa, em- 
ployes remain on duty without relief cither 
18 or 24 consecutive hours, according to the 
practice adopted for the change of shifts. The 
most cinmnoii plan to effect lliis change rif 
>hift is to work one -hift of einplnycs on the 
ilay of change through the eiilirc 24 hours, the 
succeetling shift working the regular 12 hours 



when it comes on duty. (See page 2837, hear- 
ings.) 

And yet, Mr. McMorran says it comes 
with ill grace to charge the Steel Trust 
'"with being unfair to Labor"! 

Lack of space forbids the publication of 
more of the crimes so vividly described in 
the Stanley report. However, we would 
advise everyone interested to secure a 
copy of the document in (piestion. .Any- 
one may have it by writing to his Con- 
gressman for a copy of the report. 

Then read and digest and ask yourself if 
this is the land where "equal rights for all 
and special pri\i!eges for none" are said to 
prevail ? 



•rill<: AXTl-TAP MOVEMENT. 



Eastern publications make it appear that 
the anti-Jap, movement in California has died 
a natural death. That such assumption is 
entirely erroneous will be admitted by any- 
one making an independent investigation. 

For an example, we may refer to the Anti- 
Jaj) activities among the "white" laundry 
workers and their employers. 

I'Vom a conference of the three factors of 
the laundry industry in San Francisco five 
years ago upon the cause of a general depres- 
sion in business, step by step the Anti-Japa- 
nese movement in that industry has grown, 
spreading from San Francisco to the other 
Bay Cities and the Peninsula, then to the 
interior, until the crusade has become State- 
wide. 

LTnlike most similar movements the 
Leagues have built themselves upon perma- 
nent foundations, carefully considering every 
step but progressing rapidly by constant and 
consistent effort and perseverance. Com- 
posed of both workers and employers whose 
determination to combat a common enemy 
and iireservc both business and employment 
were much stronger than their differences 
upon the less important subjects, the Leagues 
have assumed an industrial and economic po- 
sition unusual in the extreme but eminently 
successful ; and now after months of confer- 
ence and preparation a permanent central 
organization including all' the Anti-Japanese 
Leagues of the State has been formed. 

The general purpose of the new associa- 
tion is to promote the movement against 
Japanese occupation and industry and the or- 
ganization of Leagues in communities suf- 
fering from Japanese competition where no 
organized remedial effort is being made. 

At the next session of the Legislature the 
S-Vdtv association will work for the passage 
of an Alien Land Law, similar to those now 
in force in Idaho, Illinois, Kentucky, Min- 
nesota, Missouri, Oklahoma, Texas and 
Washington, prohibiting aliens ineligible to 
citizenship from owning or acquiring land 
in the State. 

Previous attempts to have such legislation 
enacted failed because in each instance the 
Washington authorities intervened and were 
able through political threats or promises to 
muster sufficient votes to defeat all anti-Jap 
legislation. 

It is believed, however, that at the com- 
ing session of the California Legislature the 
Washington chloroform will not be strong 
enough to defeat the overwhelming demand 
of the peo])lc for legislation to check the 
Jap in his steady encroachments upon the 
"white" workinijmen and women of the Stale. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



FEDERATION DELEGATES' REPORT. 



Sailors' Union of the Pacilic: 

Comrades — Your delegates to the California 
State Federation of Labor herewith report iiav- 
ing attended the sessions of the Thirteenth An- 
nual Convention of that body, held at San Diego 
October 7-12, inclusive. 

There were present at the convention some- 
thing over two hundred delegates representing 
as many local unions and central bodies. Pres- 
ent were also fraternal delegates from the State 
Building Trades Council of California and the 
Asiatic Exclusion League. The total member- 
ship of the Federation represented was approxi- 
mately 35,000. The Secretary reported that the 
Federation had a paid-up membership of 62,000, 
a gain of 6,000 since the previous convention. 

The activity of the Federation has been con- 
lined to three matters, viz: (1) Promoting legis- 
lation of benefit to lal)or; (2) organizing unions 
where none exist and aiding unions requiring 
help in organizing; (3) helping affiliated unions 
having strikes or boycotts pending by making 
appeals for support or by using its good efforts 
to obtain settlements of such disputes. 

Legislation. 

.\'o regular session of the .State Legislature 
has been held since the previous convention of 
I he Federation, but a number of measures ha\c 
been prepared, or are in course of prejjaration, 
lor ])resentation to the next session, among them 
the following: 

1. .Strengthening the Women's Fight-llour 
law and extending its provisions to all employ- 
ments now specifically exempted. 

2. Increasing the ])owers of the Commissioner 
of Labor and Statistics in several important re- 
spects, among them giving him the power to 
make settlements of wages disputes between 
em])ioyers and employes in seasonal emploj'- 
ment; making it his duty to look after the san- 
itation of factories, camps, etc.; establishing in 
different parts of the State free employment 
bmeaus. This latter measure is designed to 
help the so-called unskilled laborers, who arc 
being imposed upon bv a system of petty graft 
practiced by the private employment offices, in 
nianx' cases with the connivance of the cm- 
])lo}'ers. 

A nmnber of other measures affecting \rdr- 
ticularly individual crafts were also approved. 

The I'"ederation indorsed the amendments to 
the Constitution of the State providing for free 
text books for school children and giving each 
county of the State the power to levy taxes in 
any manner best suited to its needs, or as de- 
termined upon ])y the voters of each such 
county. The latter amendment is known as 
tlic Home Rule in Taxation Amendment and 
has received the indorsement, not alone of the 
labor organizations of the State, but of a mmi- 
ber of other semi-public organizations. 

The resolutions introduced by your delegates, 
.and the delegates representing the other mari- 
time organizations in the Federation, viz., urg- 
ing organized labor of the State to support the 
.Seamen's bill, and thanking for past assistance 
in this beh.alf; protesting against the employ- 
ment of Chinese upon American ships as being 
a discrimination against the seafaring' crafts: 
and petitioning Congress to pass legislation pro- 
hibiting the towing of log rafts through tin- 
open sea, were unanimously indorsed by the 
convention. These resolutions are appended 
hereto and will be printed in the Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 

Organization. 

Although the Federation's means are slender, 
it has accomplished considerable on the organ- 
izing field during the past year. Two organizers 
have been employed during a pa;t of the time 
in Humboldt County and in the southern part 
of the State. The convention determined to 
continue its efforts in these localities, particular 
attention to be given to the woodsmen and 
sawmill hands in and around F.ureka. The 
movement set on foot some time ago to or- 
ganize the so-called migratory workers has not 
been as successful as was hoped for, mainly 
for the reason that the Federation has been 
hampered by lack of funds, owing to the ig- 
norance and distrust shown by the men them- 
selves, and because of the presence of a would- 
be labor organization wdiose efforts everywhere 
have Ijeen directed toward destroying the or- 
ganizations of the "migratorics" wherever they 
have been formed. But, in spite of these set- 
backs, the convention expressed itself firmly of 
the conviction that this craft could be, and that 
it was absolutely necessary that it should be, 
organized. 

Strikes and Boycotts. 

'i"he b'ederation has been successful in set- 
tling several important, strikes and boycotts 
during the past year. The most important strike 
at present pending is that of the Shop Employes' 
Federation of the Harriman Railroad System. 
The convention adopted resolutions urging 
upon afliliated unions to aid the strikers finan- 
cially and by withholding their patronage from 
the railroads of this system. 

;\mong the matters of general intei'cst dealt 
with was a jiroposition for the erection and 
maintenance of a la))or temple in the Panama- 
Pacific l'".\'position grounds. This m;itter was 
referred to the American l'"ederation of Labor 
with a request for favorable action. 

The con\'ention received an appeal from .Sec- 



retary T\-eitmoe of the State Building Trades 
Council, urging upon the Federation and its af- 
filiated unions to render all the financial aid 
possible to the defense of the labor men now 
on trial at Indianapolis for conspiracy to vio- 
late a Federal law. The convention indorsed 
the appeal and instructed the delegates to pre- 
sent same to their respective unions at the ear- 
liest possible date. Complying with this in- 
struction, your delegates herewith urge upon 
the union to g'we this matter its consideration. 
There are o\ cr forty members of organized 
labor in\f)l\ed in this case, and all of them are 
entitled to, and should have provided for them, 
the best possible opportunity for making their 
defense. 

Free Speech in San Diego. 

The agitation which occurred in .San Diego 
^onie time ago for the right to speak on certain 
street corners in violation of a city ordinance, 
seems to be at an end. We are informed that 
the organized laljor people were not in sympathy 
with the attempt to violate the ordinance, but 
were drawn into the "struggle" against their 
will, owing' to the lawless actions of a body of 
men styling themselves the Citizens' Committee. 
The struggle itself, as well as the investigations 
made into its causes bj' Colonel Weinstock, rep- 
resentative of the Governor, has been a lesson 
to the trade-union movement of that city, so 
that it has not been altogether an unmixed evil. 

We feel it our duty to call your attention to 
a resolution introduced in the convention pro- 
\iding for the election of the Federation's offi- 
cers by a referendum vote of the membership. 
Your delegates cast the vote of the union as a 
unit against the proposition, not because we are 
opposed to referendmn, as such, but because we 
believe that such a system of election is un- 
necessary in view of the fact that the Federation 
is only an advisory body and neither it or its 
officers have either the power or the means of 
enforcing their mandates. Aside from this, it 
w.is pointed out that the Federation had not. 
nor had its officers, abused their power, nor 
v\:is there ;iny likelihood that such would be 
done in the future. Under the circumstances, 
to impose upon the membership a ctmibersome 
and exnensive system of elections appeared to 
us to be unwise. The resolution was defeated. 

D. P. Ilaggerty, I'anl Scharrenberg and .An- 
drew J. Gallagher, all of San Francisco, were 
elected President. Secretary, and Delegate to 
the American Federation of Labor, respectively. 

Concluding, your delegates desire to say that 
I hey were cordially received and hospitably en- 
tcrtaineil by the labor organizations and the 
citizenship of San Diego, and we feel assured 
that the presence of the convention has done 
<omc good, both to the working people of that 
citv and for the mo^■ement throughout the State. 

Kespt'ct fully submitted. 

ED. ANDERSEN. 
E. ELLISON. 

E. A. ERICKSON. 

F. C. H. MEYER. 
HARRY OHLSEN. 
PAUL SCHARRENBERG. 

San b'rancisco, Cal., October 14, 1912. 



The Crowley Launcli and To\vl)oat Com- 
])any of San Franci.sco i.s .sti'll on the unfair 
li.st of organized labor. Mr. Crowley ac- 
knowledge.s that he ha.s already lost a nnieli 
larger amount of ca.sh on account of the 
.strike than wotild be reqtiired for a number 
of years to pay all the modest increases 
asked for by the memlicrs of the Marine 
Gasoline Engineers' Lhiion. It is to be re- 
gretted that ill this age of progress and en- 
lightened intelligence there are still to l)e 
found em])loyers -who, like Mr. Crowlew 
maintain that they are the .sole judges as 
to hcnv many hours a person should work 
l^cr day while in their employ. However, 
others have been shown that it jiays to be 
reasonable, and iMr. Crowley will soon dis- 
cover that scab lovers and chea]) labor ad- 
vocates do not ])ros])er on San h'rancisco 
l)a\'. Don't ])atr()nize Crowley's latmchcs ! 



Seamen and other wage earners who are 
imavoidably absent from their homes on elec- 
tion days on account of being engaged at work 
in other parts of the .Stale, should have their 
civic rights preserved to the extent of being 
able to have their votes registered. The Jouu- 
N,\L is pleased to note that bills to effect such 
changes in the law are now being ])repared 
lor subnn'ssion Id llu' next session of (he Cal- 
if(jrnia Legislature. 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



H ead(|uarters, .San Fr.inciico, Cal., Oct. 14, 1912. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7:30 
p. m., M. \. Erickson i)residing. Secretary re- 
ported shipping fair. B.alloting for delegates to 
the Seattle Convention of the International Sea- 
men's Union of America was concluded. 

ANDREW FURUSETH, Secretary. 

44-46 East St. Bell Phone Kearny 2228. 
Ihniie Phone J 2228. 



Victoria, B. C, Oct. 7, 1912. 
.Shipping i)Oor. 

ARCHIE KING, Agent. 
Old Court Rooms, Bastion Square. 



Vancouver, B. C, Oct. 7, 1912. 
.Shipping fair. 

JOHN PEARSON, Agent. 
Labor Temple, cor. Homer and Dimsmuir. 
P. O. Box 1365. 



Tacoma Agency, Oct. 7, 1912. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping dull; pros- 
pects fair. 

H, L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 7, 1912. 
.Shipi^ing (lull; prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Port Townsend .\gency, Oct. 7, 1912. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping poor; 
prospects poor. 

WALTER MOLLER, Agent. 
229)/ Water St. P. O. Box 48. Tel. 141 J. 



Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 7, 1912. 
.Shipping fair; prospects uncertain. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



.Shipi)ing good. 

P. O. Box 2100. 
4912. 



Portland Agency, Oct. 7, 1912. 



O. DITTMAR, Agent. 
51 Union Ave. Tel. East 



I'lureka Agency, Oct. 7, 1912, 
No meeting: no <iuorum. Shipping medium: 
prospects uncertain. 

JOHN W. ERICKSEN, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 553 R. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 7, 1912. 
.Shipping f:iir: prospects good. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 67. Tel. 137, L. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 30, 1912. 
.Shipping dull; prospects poor. 

CHAS. TAUCER, Agent. 
Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts. P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS* ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San iM'ancisco, Cal, Oct. 10, 1912. 

Re.gular weekly meeting was called to order 
at 7 p. m., Eugene Burke in the chair. Secre- 
tary reported shipping slow. The report of 
the Quarterly h'inance Committee, finding stubs, 
books, money on hand and in banks correct, 
was read and adopted. 

EUGENE STEIDLb; Secretary. 

I^lioiie Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. .\ I'Hi. 
.Sliip])in.g good; jirospects uncertain. Nomi- 
n.afcd delegates to ihc International Seamen's 
Union and oflicers for the ensuing term. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
P. O. Box 1335. 1003 Western Ave. Phone 
Sim Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 2, 1912. 
.Shipping ;ind prospects good; few men ashore. 
.X'ominated (lele.yates to the International Sea- 
men's Union .and officers for the ensuing term, 
HARRY POTHOFF, Agent. 
P. O. Box 54. 

The llrilish steamer Frankdale has been char- 
Icied by I'lalfoiu', Guthrie Sz Conu>any for lum- 
ber from the Columliia River to Sydney or New 
castle. .She is now due at Valparaiso and will 
come north in ballast. The British l)ark Inverna 
li.as I'.cen t;iken by .M. II. Ilouser for wheat from 
'■orll.inil to the Unilecl Kingdom at 41s. 3d. for 
lanii.iry loading, nv -lOs. for I'ebriKiry loadin,g. 
,Shc is at MoiUevideo and will come around the 
I lorn in Ij.alla.st. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



*^^* 



OIN THE GREAT LAKES, 



Contributed by the Lake Seamen's Union 



*^^* 



THE "PERIL" OF THE IMMIGRANT. 



When a million or more immigrants 
come to America during a single year it 
makes most people wonder what is to be- 
come of our country, but the "peril of the 
immigrant" is for the most part a phantasy 
of the imagination. In spite of the fact 
that immigrants have been coming to 
America in such large numbers in recent 
years, it is interesting to note that the 
percentage of foreign-born living in the 
United States at any one time has not ma- 
terially changed since 1860. Following are 
some figures: In 1860 the percentage of 
foreigners in the United States was 13.2 
per cent.; in 1870 14.4 per cent.; in -1880 
13.3 per cent.; in 1890 14.8 per cent.; in 
1900 13.7 per cent.; in 1910 14.7 per cent. 
The constant percentage therefore is about 
14. 

During some years more than half as 
many immigrants returned to the father- 
land as came to America. The condition 
of the labor market in America determines 
the number of foreigners that come and 
go, so that immigration is in a constant 
state of flux. The foreigner not only takes 
care of himself by returning to his native 
land during a time of industrial depres- 
sion, where he can live more cheaply, but 
he also relieves the labor market of con- 
gestion which might result in great harm 
to the American worker. 

It has sometimes been declared with con- 
siderable feeling that the immigrant comes 
here merely for the purpose of making 
what is to him a small fortune and then 
returns to his own country, remaining there 
to spend this money; but, in the first 
place, he has honestly earned whatever he 
takes with him and has left more than its 
equivalent, and he has a right to do with 
it as he pleases. This is more than can 
be said of some Americans who go to 
foreign lands and spend small fortunes 
among an alien people. 

But what about these immigrants? Are 
they a peril? Edward A. Steiner, who 
knows more about the human side of the 
immigration problem than any other man 
in America, recently declared that 5,000 
strong-limbed, healthy-bodied immigrants 
landing at Ellis Island are more resource- 
ful than as many average college graduates 
would be — and Steiner knows, for he is a 
college professor. They come to us, most 
of these immigrants, after their own coun- 
tries have paid the cost of their education. 
They are ready to take up their day's work 
the moment they land on our American 
shore. We are often concerned about what 
we term the "new immigration," but Rob- 
ert Watchorn, for several years Commis- 
sioner of Immigration at Ellis Island, once 
remarked: "If you give the Italian, the 
Hungarian and the Russian Jew half a 
chance, he will make the English, and the 
Irish look like thirty cents." And pre- 
sumably Mr. Watchorn knew what he was 
talking about, for he has handled literally 
millions of immigrants. 

In the early days there was no careful 
inspection of the immigrant. Many of 
them came to this country feeble or dis- 



eased, with the result that comparatively 
soon they became a burden upon our 
charities and unquestionably affected the 
health of the community through contagi- 
ous diseases. But this is not the case to- 
day. The steamship companies are too 
heavily fined in case they transport an un- 
desirable immigrant, so that they are usu- 
ally careful in their inspection. 

It is true that many of the immigrants 
are illiterate. Possibly 25 per cent, of the 
persons 14 years of age or over who come 
to us can neither read nor write. Most of 
these come from the small towns or rural 
districts where the educational facilities 
are not as good as they are in the city, but 
it should be remembered that the most 
undesirable — that is the criminal — classes 
among Europeans coine from the cities and 
are usually the best educated. The test of 
literacy is not by any means the best one 
in our selection of the immigrant. 

If the immigrant, who makes a few thou- 
sand dollars in this country and returns 
with it is worth keeping in America, we 
should offer him the right kind of induce- 
ments to remain here. As a matter of 
fact, we stack him in shacks, we exploit 
him in our economic life and we do not 
always give him a man's chance. He should 
be made to see the advantage of remain- 
ing in .America after he has become a use- 
ful citizen. 

But family relationships, the spare cash 
deposited in foreign savings banks, the 
pleading for loyalty on the part of the gov- 
ernment, the constant inducement offered 
by the steamship companies and the na- 
tural love of the fatherland which exists 
in the heart of every patriot — all these 
have a tendency to pull them back. But 
suppose that the immigrant does return to 
the fatherland. He goes to tell of the 
greatness and the glory of America, and so 
it often happens that when the returned 
immigrant finds that the conditions which 
first drove him out have remained un- 
changed, back he comes, the leader of a 
band which also seeks its fortune in this 
wonderland where a man may earn four 
times as much as he earned at home ; 
where women are honored as they are in 
no other part of the world; where even 
the rights of little children are respected. 
Here they find religious and political free- 
dom, a chance to make the most of them- 
selves and economic liberty such as they 
never knew before. 

Settling principally in large cities and 
influenced by segregative tendencies, they 
form their "Ghettos," their "Little Italys," 
their "Bohemian Hills," often retaining 
their old country social ideas and customs. 
Coming from lands where their privileges 
have been restricted, they become an easy 
prey to agitators. Sometimes the false 
economic doctrines accepted abroad influ- 
ence their relationships in America. Pur- 
chased and led to the polls by corrupt 
politicians, they become a menace to the 
well-being of our country. But in spite 
of all this, the average foreigner will make 
a good citizen if the American will show 
him how. The real "peril" is in the 
American. A foreigner not yet naturalized 
wrote to friends in the fatherland : "Amer- 



ica is a great country. They not only al- 
low you to vote, but they pay you for 
voting." Who was responsible for this 
situation? 

It is the children of the foreigner who 
are our greatest peril, and they have re- 
ceived their training in this country. The 
criminal classes are largely augmented from 
among these children of respectable, hard- 
working foreigners. Any movement which 
seeks to help these children should be 
heartily supported. After all, it resolves it- 
self into a question of neighborliness. Quit 
calling them "dagoes" and "sheenies" and 
"hunkies," and stop thinking of the for- 
eigner as a problem. How would you like 
to be a "problem"? Think of the foreigner 
as a brother. This will help iinmensely on 
both sides. — Rev. Chas. Stelzle. 



TO PREVENT COLLISIONS. 



Electrical science has been advanced a 
step further by the invention of a sound- 
direction indicator, for the prevention of 
collisions during a fog at sea. The inven- 
tion is the work of William and Gerald 
Hodgkinson, two young electrical en- 
gineers, who for the past two years have 
been conducting experiments on Congleton 
Moss, Cheshire, and are at present demon- 
strating the practicability of their idea on 
the River Mersey. 

The invention has been installed on the 
steam lighter France, and to-day a number 
of prominent gentlemen interested in the 
work of the port, including Mr. Alfred Big- 
land, M. P., and Mr. Anderson of the Dock 
Board, gathered on board the lighter to 
witness the sound indicator in operation. 
.Mthough the river was alive with craft, 
no hitch was experienced, every sound, 
whether from siren, voice, or the rattle of 
machinery was received and indicated by 
the sensitive instrument. 

The invention consists of a large drum, 
9 feet in diameter, and is slung aloft, away 
from any possible interference from deck 
sounds, and is provided with 16 receiving 
mouths, which receive all sound waves. At 
the base of the mouths are fixed contact 
breakers, which, while stable to ordinary 
mechanical vibration, is sensitive to gen- 
eral sound waves. Each of these receivers 
is responsible for sounds from a particular 
direction. 

These contact breakers are connected 
electrically to a relay case, consisting of 
relays equivalent to the number of receiv- 
ers, in turn being connected to a box 
having a circle of small electric lamps, to 
the same number as the receivers, which 
will indicate the direction of the sounds. 
When a sound strikes the contact breakers 
this disturbs the electrical circuit, thus 
operating the relays, and at the same time 
lights the lamps on the indicator. If the 
sound is near, then more than one lamp 
will become ignited, but as the units are 
standardized the direction of the sound 
wave is shown by a line dividing the sec- 
tions operated. At distances over 1 mile 
only one lamp is lighted, and the direction 
is shown in a clear manner. 

Should the sound wave come from the 
right of the ship then the lamps on the 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



right of the circle are illuminated; if on the 
left, then it is the lamps to the left; and 
if directly ahead, then the lamps pointing 
in that direction. With a passing vessel 
successive units are operated, thus clearly 
denoting the course upon which the ship is 
steering. 

The indicating apparatus can be fixed 
wherever convenient for the ship's officer, 
and the whole installation, besides being 
most compact, is estimated to cost some- 
where about £250 ($1,216.6?). 



OLDEST AMERICAN VESSELS. 



Monuments to the excellence of Ameri- 
can shipbuilding are not found at their best 
in our giant cargo carriers and splendid 
modern vessels of war. The perfect trib- 
utes to the art in which this country has 
never taken second place are rather dis- 
covered in the few surviving pioneers of 
the merchant fleet which began their ca- 
reers when the nation was hardly out of 
its teens, and which are yet good for years 
to come. 

These venerable embodiments of sturdi- 
ness and durability, though small in ton- 
nage, are yet worthy representatives of 
the erstwhile unnumbered fleets of white 
winged argosies which played a very im- 
portant part in winning America its com- 
mercial supremacy, yet they have with few 
exceptions no apparent prospects of at- 
taining niches in the maritime hall of fame, 
and for the most part blush unseen in the 
humblest of occupations. 

Loyal devotees to things nautical declare 
that only the comparative juvenility of the 
shipbuilding industry in this comparatively 
youthful land gives Denmark the ownership 
of the oldest vessel in commission, the 
sloop Constance, built in 1723. It is only 
a coincidence that the same flag flies over 
the oldest known product of American ship- 
yards, though it is possible that stray craft 
of native birth are existent, unhonored and 
unsung, in more remote portions of the 
globe. 

Be that as it may, the clipper schooner 
Vigilant of St. Thomas, D. W. I., is suf- 
ficient testimony to the superiority of Yankee 
white oak and Yankee skill. The Vigilant, a 
vessel of ninety-nine tons, was built at Balti- 
more in 1790, and was very soon afterwards 
sold foreign. Nearly all the time since she 
has been employed in trading about the Dan- 
ish Antilles, though in the summer of 1909 
she came northward and made a voyage in 
command of Captain Jacobsen from Dysart, 
Scotland, to Spaniard's Bay, Newfoundland. 
This was seemingly an arduous under- 
taking for a schooner of her age and size, 
though Newfoundland vessels of equally 
small tonnage are regularly employed in 
transatlantic trade. During the war be- 
tween Denmark and Great Britain, in 1807- 
1814, the Vigilant was used with success 
as a privateer against the English. She is 
still in the pink of condition. 

As small vessels are apt to change hands 
with much frequency, it is not surprising 
that their ancestries are often lost sight of, 
especially if extending far into the past. 
This was the case with the little schooner 
Mary and Margaret, owned by C. W. 
Hand, of Port Norris, N. J., and engaged 
in the monotonous business of oyster 
dredging in Maurice River Cove. Her 
skipper, Captain Charles S. Peterson, has 



none of the air which might properly be 
worn by the commander of the oldest mer- 
chant vessel flying the Stars and Stripes, 
for it is doubtful if he, or the other sea- 
farers who daily rub elbows, so to speak, 
with the archaic craft, know her as such. 

The Mary and Margaret was built at 
Newport, N. J., in 1804, but when she was 
rebuilt at Bridgeton in 1864, the latter 
year in some manner was adopted as her 
official date of birth. The original figures 
gradually passed into oblivion, but accord- 
ing to a rule at Lloyds the ]\Iary Ann re- 
paired all out of the old into the new is 
still the Mary Ann. Thus, though the fa- 
mous frigate Constitution, except for her 
starboard mizzen topsail brace bitt, is not 
her original self, the year of her launching, 
1798, is preserved. 

The exploits of the little schooner Polly, 
built in 1805, at Amesbury, Mass.. and gen- 
erally considered the oldest American 
schooner, have caused her to be a much 
coveted craft in late years. Plans were 
made for exhibiting her at the Jamestown 
Exposition, but they were not carried out. 
Recently the Daughters of the American 
Revolution and Commander Peary have 
been negotiating for the possession of the 
famous vessel, but she has now been pur- 
chased by J. H. Welden, of Dighton, 
Mass., who also intends preserving her for 
her historic associations. 

The Polly was built for Captain William 
Spear, of Amesbury, Mass., and was named 
for his wife. Rigged as a sloop, she was 
fitted out as a privateer in the war of 1812, 
and being a fine sailer did yoeman service 
for her patriotic owner until she was cap- 
tured by the British frigate Phoebe and 
taken into Castine. Soon after she was 
cut out by Americans, and under Boston 
ownership was changed into a schooner 
and placed in the coasting trade, which 
has ever since been her employment. 

It was not the peaceful occupation which 
might have been expected, however, for 
she was again nabbed off Cape Ann dur- 
ing the second year of the war, when laden 
with lumber and fish on her way to Bos- 
ton. Her captor this time was the British 
privateer Wolverine, whose master forced 
Captain French and his crew of seven 
aboard of the leaky old Newburyport sloop 
Betsy, another prize, and left them to their 
own devices. The Betsy finally reached 
Plymouth in a sinking condition, and the 
Polly was recaptured by an American pri- 
vateer. 

She was rebuilt in 1864, thus starting 
again in life equally with the Mary and 
Margaret. Since that time she has been 
owned successively in Mt. Desert, Rock- 
land, Portland, Belfast and Rockland. For 
many years the Polly was sailed out of 
Belfast by Captain George F. Ryan, one 
of the oldest and best known of Maine 
coastwise skippers. Her last owner was 
Captain Walter V. Spencer, of Rockland, 
who plied in the lumber trade between 
Bangor and other Maine ports until he 
sold her this year. — Sailors' Magazine. 



LInilcd States Consul George Nicolas 
Ifft writes that the Nuremberg (Germany) 
breweries during 1911 produced 21,631,368 
gallons of beer, of which 7,589,656 gallons 
were brought into tiie city and 6,181,956 
gallons exported. The retail price of beer 
in Nuremberg averages 6 cents per quart. 



NOTICE TO SEAMEN. 



IMPORTANT. 



Any seaman who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above sta- 
ted reasons, or because of rules of the so- 
called "Welfare Plan," by any agent or 
representative of the Lake Carriers' Asso- 
ciation or any of its allied concerns, in- 
cluding the masters and officers of the 
ships. Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 
V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

Joseph Orlick, last heard of on steamer 
Santa Marie, in 1908, is inquired for by 
Carl Stocket, 71 Main street, Buflfalo, N. Y. 

Ed Jordan, No. 10415, L. S. U., is inquired 
for by his sister, Mrs. Raynor, 319 Caroline 
Street South, Hamilton. Any one knowing 
his whereabouts please notify the above ad- 
dress. 



LAKE DISTRICT, I. S. U. of A. 

HEADQUARTERS: 

L.AKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

570 West Lake Street, Chicago, III. 
BRANCHES AND AGENCIES. 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, 21 High Street 

Telephone 552. 

TOLEDO, OHIO 54 Main Street 

Telephone Bell East 756. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone, New, Broad 385. 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

CONNEAUT, 992 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 
HEADQUARTERS. 
71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone Seneca 48. 

BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 445 LaSalle Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1814 Fourth Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 

HEADQUARTERS. 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 2296. 
BRANCHES. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 314 N. Clark Street 

ASHTABULA, 74 Bridge Street 

TOLEDO. 54 Main Street 

DETROIT. MICH 7 East Woodbridge Street 

PORT HURON, MICH 617 Water Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 
MARINE HOSPITALS. 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 
RELIEF STATIONS. 

Ashland, Wis. Ogdensburg, N. Y. 

Ashtabula Harbor, O. 0.swego, N. Y. 

Buffalo, N. Y. Port Huron, Mich. 

Duluth, Minn. Manitowoc, Wis. 

Escanaba, Mich. Maniuette, Mich. 

Grand Haven, Mich. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Green Ray, Mich. Saginaw, Mich. 

Houghton, Mich. Sandusky, O. 

Lur".,igton, Mich. Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 

Manistee, Mich. Sheboygan, Wis. 

Erie, Pa. Superior, Wis. 

Menominee, Mich. Toledo. O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



THE SEA'S MYSTERIES. 



Ivverv year there is posted on a little 
hardwood ])oard in the offices of Lloyd's 
a list of names of ships — at the top of 
whicli the word "Missing" is neatly printed 
in Roman letters. TJttle or no attention 
is paid to tiiis list by the stream of busy 
men and women passing the board daily; 
yet each name represents a tragedy, the 
most per])le.\ing feature of which is that its 
cause and details are likely to remain a 
mystery. Each year brings its quota of 
such tragedies, and in spite of the many 
improvements introduced in recent years to 
make travel at sea better and safer the 
number of ships posted as "Missing, Fate 
Unknown" does not seem to lessen ma- 
terially. What causes these ships to dis- 
appear without leaving as much as a sign 
of wreckage to tell the tale, in many cases, 
is a difficult problem to solve. The ma- 
jority of them undoubtedly strain in heavy 
weather, through defective loading, and 
founder at sea. Collisions with icebergs, 
drifting derelicts, and uncharted rocks, fire. 
and the blowing up of boilers may be 
causes that prove fatal to these ships. Rut 
what ))ccomes of tiieir crew? Do tlioy. to 
(|Uote J>yron, "siids into tjic depths with 
liubbling groans"? or do they escajie shar- 
ing the same watery grave as their vessel — 
to die of hun.gcr, thirst, and exposure, be- 
tween sea and sky, with sharks and birds 
of prey to watch their agony? These are 
(|ucstions that friends and relatives of the 
missing men would like to have answered. 

Reports from IJoyd's Register reveal the 
astonishing fact that on the average sixty 
shi])s with their crews are annually blotted 
from sight. In 1911 not less than twenty- 
one sailing ships and twenty steamers dis- 
appeared and are today registered as "Mis- 
sing, Fate L'nknown." C^ne of the saddest 
disappearances in 1910 was that of the 
naval tug Nina bound from Hampton 
Roads to Boston. She was commanded by 
Chief Roatswain John S. Crogjian, U. S. 
Xavy, an I. C. S. student and a graduate 
of the Ocean Navigation Course. The Nina 
had a crew of 32 men. After leaving 
Hampton Roads in February she ran into 
bad weather and is supposed to have been 
swamped by licavy seas and gone down 
with men and all. None was saved, and 
the pieces of woodwork picked up by ves- 
sels sent out by the Xavy Department to 
look for the missing tug onlj' confirmed 
the tragic fate of the Nina. Rut no details 
of the immediate cause of her loss have 
been secured. 

Goin.g over the records of Lloyds for 
the last fifty years or more so many cases 
of missing ships are found that but a few 
of the more conspicuous ones can be men- 
tioned here. .Among the historic disappear- 
ances — because of the size of the ship and 
the great number of passengers she carried 
— was that of the City of Glasgow, the 
pioneer passenger steamer of the Inman 
(now the .AniericanV Line plying between 
.\cw York and Glasgow in the early fifties. 
Her displacement was 1600 tons and she 
was at that time considered as one of the 
stanchesl vessels afloat. In addition to her 
steam engines she was e(|uipped with a 
bark rig carrying an immense sjiread of 
canvas, more than enough to take caro of 
her in case of the breakdown of her ma- 



chinery. When starting on her voyage on 
March 1. 1854. she carried 480 passengers 
in addition to her crew of 70. .\fter lea\'- 
ing port she was never heard from again. 
Not c\cn so much as a splinter of her 
woodwork was ever picked up. 

.\ few years before, on May 1, 18.^0, the 
Rritish ship Lady Nugent set sail for 
Madras with a troop of 367 men aboard, 
bound for Rangoon. Weeks and weeks 
passed without any word of the ship reach- 
ing her flestination ; then month after 
month came and went, and still no hint of 
her fate. Other ships were urged to look 
for the Lady Nugent ; the shores of Madras 
were searched for wreckage because of re- 
ports that she had .been sighted off that 
coast, but no trace was ever found of her. 

On January 20, 1870, another Inman 
liner, the City of Roston, left Halifax for 
England with 191 people on board. That 
was the last heard of her. Not so mucli 
as a broken spar nor a w^ooden bucket 
identified as belonging to this missing liner 
was e\cr picked up. The cause of her dis- 
ajipcarancc remains a secret up to this day. 
It was as if .some gigantic monster of the 
sea had grabbed her, men and all, and sent 
her into the depths of the Atlantic. 

The same thing happened to the Erin of 
the National Line, which has never been 
sighted since she sailed in 1889 with 72 
people on board. Scarcely a year later the 
Thancniore, a Johnston Liner, with 43 ]ias- 
sengers, went the same way. 

In the early 90's the Naronic of the 
White Star line left port with 74 on board 
and was lost without lea\ing a single clue 
as to the cause of her disappearance. She 
was a twin-screw steamer, ably officered 
and manned. Her (Jisa])pearance created 
a profdund impression, 

.\liout the same time the l^urvie Castle 
sailed from Liverj^ool for .\nstralia. She 
should have made a final call at I'lyuKjuth 
for extra cargo; but she never came with- 
in sight of that port. If wrecked, it must 
ha\e been within sight of land: but never 
so much as a bit of wood was e\"er washed 
ashore. 

On April 9, 189.x the I'.ritish sailing ship 
Lord Spencer left San Francisco in com- 
mand of Captain Leahy, one of the best 
known skippers on the Pacific. The ship 
was loaded witli grain, carried a jiicked 
crew of 30 men and se\eral passengers, 
and was bound for Liverpool via Caj^e 
Horn. When she became overdue San 
Francisco brokers began to speculate on 
her. She was reinsured until the rate 
jumped to over 80 per cent., and while the 
Englishmen unloaded the .-\nierican under- 
writers took up the risks. lUit they lost. 
.\ year or more passed without news from 
the ship, and she was finally registered as 
".Missing" and remains so to-day. 

In 1904 the ship Lamorna sailed from 
Tacoma, Washington, with a cargo of 
wheat for Oueenstowm. A fierce gale fol- 
lowed on the heels of her departure. A 
little later pieces of wreckage were found, 
and the report was circulated that the 
Lamorna had been battered to pieces on 
the rocks off Cape Flattery. Soon, how- 
ever, came another report: she had been 
sighted badly damaged but was still afloat 
off Coos Ray. The owners and friends of 
the sailors gained ho|)e and came to be 
lieve it true that she had weathered the 
gale and would arrive in Oueenstown in 



LABOR'S ECONOMIC PLATrORM. 

Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
hy the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free te.xt books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hoiir day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less t^ian tiie prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anfi-child labor laws in 
Slates where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted into 
law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. .Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public batli 
system in all cities. 

IS. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation hy the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of United States Gov- 
ernment Postal Savings Banks. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEM'S UNION 
or AMERICA. 

(Continued from Page 5.) 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
S.\N FIJ.\NCISCO. Cal., 91 Stcuart St. 

Branches: 
SE.ATTLK, Wa.sh.. 1408% Western Ave.. P. O. Box 
S75. 

POUTKANI), Ore., 101 N. Front St. 

SAN PKIiRO, Cal., 123 Fifth St., P. O. Box 574. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST, 
Headquarters: 
S.\N FliANCISCO, Cal.. hi Stouart St. 

Branches: 
SKATTLK, Wash., 209-210 Powell Building, P. O 
Box KSS.'i. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 64. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC, 

Headquarters: 

ASTORIA, Ore.. P. O. Box 138. 

Branches: 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

LA CONNER, Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERHEE.V, Wash.. P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
C.EOKOICrOWN, Wash 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PRO.SI'ER. Ore. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 

KETCHIKAN. 
I.ORINO. Alask.i. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBURG. Alaska. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 93 Steuart St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE. W.ash.. 81 Seneca St.. P. O. Box 42 
ASTOIU.V, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 



The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can he procun^d hy seamen at 
any of the above-mentioned places; 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OP AVSTRALAii/ 

29 ERSKINE STREET. SYDNEY, N. 8. W. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



due lime. lUit weeks and weeks passed 
witliout news from lier. A long lime after 
this the German ship Artemis sighted a 
sailing ship far out at sea, with sails set, 
beating against head winds, hut with no 
display of any kind of signals. In conse- 
quence little attention w-as paid to her, as it 
was thought she must he able to take care 
of herself. Presently, however, the un- 
known ship began to execute a series of 
freak maneu\ers that looked queer to the 
captain of the Artemis. She behaved as 
if manned by a crew of crazy men. The 
Artemis bore down on the stranger close 
enough tf) make out the name Tvamorna. 
Consudting their shiiiping records the of- 
ficers of the .Artemis found that a ship b}- 
that name was long overdue and accord- 
inglv decided to investigate. The stranger 
was hailed, but no answer came. What 
had become of licr crew? Her hull, 
spars, and rigging seemed in good condi- 
tion. Suddenlv she swung her bow to- 
ward the west and ran (iff before the wind 
as steadily as if kei)t on her cnursc by a 
human being. I'eing convinced that the 
stranger was abandoned by her crew, the 
.\rtemis made no allcmi)! to follow her. 
That was the last seen of her. The 
chances are tliat when sci;d<ed wilh \va1er 
her cargo of wheat would swell and burs! 
flic hull. I'.ul the fate of her cre.v is still 
a mvstery that defies solution. 

The strangest of all deep-sea mysteries 
is ])erhaps the case of ihe brig Afarie 
Celeste, which was .nbandnncd nc;ir llic 
.\zores for apparcnll\' no reason at all, no 
trace e^■er being found of any one of her 
crew or ])assengers. So much has been 
written with the object of explaining this 
mvstcrv, the real facts of the case ha\'e in 
many accounts been forced to the l)ack- 
ground. l>ut from official records and the 
testimony of eyewitnesses the following 
is a fair account of this most per])lexing 
afYair: The Marie Celeste sailed from 
New A'ork on Novend)er 7, 187.3, bound 
for Genoa, carrying a cargo of pelroleum 
and alcohol. She had a crew of ten men 
and officers and was commanded by Cap- 
tain ?). S. Rriggs, who had as passengers 
his young wife and their two-year-old 
child. The Marie Celeste ])assed the island 
of St. Mary's, in the .\zores, on Novem- 
ber 24. So much is known from the entries 
in her log. The rest is mystery. In the 
forenoon of December 4 the ship Dei 
Gratia, which had left New York for 
Gibraltar several days later than the INIarie 
Celeste, sighted a vessel moving along in 
a rather eccentric fashion, under shortened 
sail, though the wind and weather were 
fine. She was the Marie Celeste. To the 
hail of the Dei Gratia no reply was given. 
.\ l)oat was lowered from the Dei Gratia 
and her second-mate was rowed across to 
the ]\Iarie " Celeste. lie made a hasty 
search. The cargo of alcohtjl and oil was 
undisturbed. In ihe forecastle the sailors' 
cliest. clothing, and f)ilskins were found, 
as if none had been carried away. In the 
cabin there was sheet music on the open 
melodeon, and upon the table were scis- 
sors, needle, thread, and cloth, as if a 
woman had hastily tossed tiiere the sewing 
on which she was engaged. .\ clock ticked 
on the wall. Toys were strewn carelessly 
about the floor. Nowhere was there the 
slightest sign of haste, of disorder, of inu- 
liudus struggle. ^'el every one h;id de 
serted the brig. Food and water were 



l)lenty ; e\"erything" was in good condition, 
'i'here had been no storm. The weather 
I'or several days had been fine and the 
sea smooth. Why, then, if there was no 
gale, no mutiny, no famine, no ])estilence, 
should the brig's occupants ha\'e vanished? 
Or. if they deserted the ship, why did 
the\' leave tlieir clothes, money, jewelry, 
etc.. behind them? If, on the other hand, 
the ship had been overhauled by latter- 
day ])irates that slaughtered ])asscngers 
and crew, why were not the valuables 
carried away-' In the mate's cabin was 
fiuind the log-slate. This slate was fidl 
(if ihe usual routine entries u]i to the 
da}' before she was hailed bv the Dei 
Gratia. Some accounts say that one of the 
ship's boats was gone. Others declare the 
l)oats were all in place, making the prob- 
lem of the wdiolesale disappearance still 
more ]:)er|)lexing. Since that time no news 
whalexer has come from any of the occu- 
pants I if the ]\Iarie Celeste. If thev left 
the ship it is certain they never reached 
the land anywhere. The Marie Celeste 
was sailed to Gibraltar by a prize crew 
from the Dei (^.ralia. From the dav the 
Marie Celeste was launched in 1869 to the 
dav she was finally wrecked in 188.^ her 
career was one long series of misfortunes. 

M;tny peo])le ?ire under the impression 
thai the majority of missing ships are rot- 
ten hulks unfit to sail the seas. .\s a 
matter of fact statistics show that 80 per 
i"enl. of such vessels are classed 100 .\1, 
the highest rating given by the Lloyds and 
the A^erilas Classification Societies, 'i'akc 
the well-known British ship, the Chipper 
Kyle, \vhich disai)y)eared in L'O.^ during a 
voyage froni Newcastle, N. S. W., to \'al- 
paraiso. Sshc was a new and splendidly 
ecpiijiped steel vessel, had a crew of 2S, 
and was in command of Captain D. Wil- 
son, considercfl one of the ablest among 
Uritish navigators. Yet she dropped out 
of sight and there is absolutely no in- 
formation asailable to aid one in ff)rming a 
safe conjecture as to the reason for her 
disappearance. The American ships .\rlliur 
Sewall and the .Macrifa, the schooner ]\Iary 
.\. Duff, the Japanese Goto Maru. the 
Genuan ship Euro]>a, and the British 
steamer I'rsida llrighl. which disappeared 
during the same year, were new. 

One thing that bids fair to reduce the 
number of missing ships in the future, at 
least so far as steamships are concerned, 
is the general adoption of wireless tele- 
graphy on ocean-going craft. No matter 
what ha]^])ens to a vessel in distress, if 
C(piip])ed with wireless outfit her chance 
1r) mrdce known her i^light and call for lu'lj) 
to (ilher shi])S within her zone is good in 
(\q<:(\. V>\ the aid of this marvelous in- 
N'ention the grim tragedies f)f missing ships 
will be made ordinar^' disasters of the 
sea. and Ihe element of cruel tuicertainl v, 
of allernale hope and despair of those at 
home, will lie eliminated. — Captain 1",. 1\. 
i-Joden. in ".Ambition." 



I'orty-one amendments to the Ohio con- 
stitution, including the initiative, Ihe re- 
ferendtnn, the abolition of the death i)en- 
alt\', workmen's compensation for acci- 
dental injuries, better i)ul)lic-road laws, 
an eight-hour day labor law, and direct 
])rim.'n'ies, were adopted at a recent special 
ck'ction. Woman suffrage was defeated 
b\- a sulislantial niajoritv. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 

(Continued from Page 3.) 



yields $22,631,200 as a record for one year. 
When it is taken into consideration that 
the total sum expended by the Brother- 
hood in the year under consideration was 
only $701,166.67, it is revealed that the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters is pay- 
ing a dividend to its members unparalleled 
by any corporate body engaged in the 
mercantile or any other business in the 
entire world. It is an argument in favor 
of the organization of the workmen thai 
cannot be controverted. 



Pressmen Return. 

Scjme two weeks ago the .\tlanla Web 
Pressmen's Union was locked out from 
the three Atlanta, Ga., dailies, the Consti- 
tution, the Georgian, and the Journal, after 
failing to reach an agreement with the pub- 
lishers for a renewal of their contract. 
The newspapers in question attempted to 
establish the open shop, but the pressmen 
refused to accept the dictum of the em- 
ployers. The pressmen, after endeavoring 
to reach an adjustment of the difficulty 
wilh the employers and, failing, sought the 
assistance of the Atlanta Federation of 
Trades. A committee was appointed from 
this latter organization, and after nego- 
tiations lasting two da)'S, a contract satis- 
factory to both the pressmen and the pub- 
lishers was entered into, and the pressmen 
have returned to their former positions on 
the papers involved in the controversy. In 
the Journal of Labor, published by Jerome 
Jones, an editorial compliments the wis- 
dom of the pressmen and the employers, 
and emphasizes the influence exercised by 
the central body in securing this settle- 
ment. 



\ bill introduced at the ciu'rent session 
of the Argentine Congress provides for the 
appointment of a special committee to 
carry out .an economic study on the fol- 
lowing jioints: Properties of the State 
and concession of same; private iirojierlies, 
including pastoral, agricultural, industrial, 
and commercial interests; credit, insur- 
ance, transport, money, economics, demog- 
raphy, crops. .A bill was also presented 
1o Congress to the effect that all employes 
of ])rivate railways are to be entitled to 
the benefits of the law providing for the 
pensioning of national cmploj'es ; tiie pen- 
sion to be earned after 2.^ years of service 
and Si) _\-ears of age, and to be 05 per cent. 
of the last year's salary. The Go\ern- 
mcnl is authorized to arrange with the 
coni])anies concerning the creation of a 
pension fund. 



The poi)ulalion of Sweden at the end of 
I'Ml is reported to have been 5.561,799, 
an increase of 39,396 for the year. This 
is said to be the lowest increase in any 
given year since 1905. It is estimaled that 
19,9*I8 ])eo]ile emigrated from the country 
last year, while 7,770 immigrated to Swe- 
den Din-ing 1912. however, there appears 
to be a decided decrease in the number of 
emigrants, at least up to June, for only 
4,500 people lefl Sweden during the first 
li\'e months of this year while 6,700 emi- 
;■;;■. lied in the same periml in 1*)1]. 



Demand tlu- union label u])on all purchases! 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




'Ln-r i j' i -n-nj- i _rL[~ i j~Lru~>~i~f'' i -- i - ---■---■*» ^* ■ > • ■ ■ 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



Residence Phone Ind. Green 185 



School Phone Ind. A 4484 



Tying up work on urgent Govern- 
ment orders for automatic rifles, re- 
volvers and machine guns for the 
army, 1,000 employes of the Colt 
Revolver Works went on strike at 
Hartford, Conn. 

Pending action on the proposed 
new wage scale prepared at a con- 
ference of mine owners and repre- 
sentatives of the United Mine Work- 
ers of America last week, every coal 
miner in Montana walked out on 
October 1. 

The call for the thirty-second an- 
nual convention of the American 
Federation of Labor, to be held at 
Rochester, N. Y., beginning Monday 
morning, November 11, 1912, has 
been issued. The meeting will be 
held in Convention Hall. A list 
of hotels and the per diem charge 
at each is given. Headquarters of 
the Federation will be at the Seneca 
Hotel. Reservations at any of the 
hotels can be secured by address- 
ing the secretary of the convention 
committee, Peter Bohrer, 179 Wil- 
liams street, Rochester, N. Y. 

At the next general State election 
in November the voters of Colorado 
are to pass upon the proposition for 
placing the playgrounds, recreation, 
neighborhood, and social centers, 
public baths, public libraries, and 
schools under the same authority, 
says the September number of the 
Survey. The proposed amendment 
also provides that except during 
school hours school houses shall be 
open to the people for the discus- 
sion of public questions concerning 
their civic, social, business, and po- 
litical affairs. 

It is reported from official sources 
that the President has determined 
to apply the salient features of the 
Workmen's Compensation Act, which 
passed the Senate during the last ses- 
.sion of Congress, to the Panama 
Canal Zone. Under the Panama 
Canal Act the President was em- 
powered to make the laws for the 
Zone by executive order. It is stated 
that the workmen's compensation bill 
referred to has been redrafted to 
suit the needs of the Zone, and has 
been sent to Panama for the approv- 
al of the officials there. 

The prosecution in the famous 
Danbury hatters' case has submitted 
all the testimony and the defense 
will now have an oportunity to pre- 
sent its side of the case. The trial 
is being held before Judge James L. 
Martin and a jury in the United 
States Court. Daniel Davenport, the 
attorney for the Anti-Boycott Asso- 
ciation, has conducted the case for 
the prosecution, as in the former 
trial, when the Loewe Hat Company 
secured a verdict under the Sher- 
man anti-trust law, which, when 
trebled, amounted to $222,000 and 
costs. 

A general strike of the employes 
of the Wall Paper Manufacturers' 
Association, which has thirty-five 
factories throughout the country, 
one of the largest of which is in 
Brooklyn, is threatened. It is stated 
that 500 members of the Machine 
Printers and Color Mixers' Union 
are on strike already in the factories, 
thus throwing into idleness between 
4,000 and 5,000 helpers and laborers. 
Unless a settlement is reached in 
the near future the entire wall paper 
manufacturing trade is likely to be 
brought to a standstill. The con- 
troversy is over the renewal of an 
expired contract. 



MARSHALL'S 
Navigation School 



Day and Night 
REASONABLE TERMS 
204 Grand Trunk Pacific Dock 



SEATTLE 



EUREKA, CAL. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 
UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



Seattle Navigation School 




Headquarters For 

Union Made Clothing 

FURNISHINGS, HATS AND SHOES 

At 

WESTERMAN & SCHERMER 

220 and 222 First Avenue, South 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



Bonney-Watson Co. 

UNDERTAKERS 
3rd and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 
Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or 
telegraph promptly attended to 
Phone, Main 13 
Independent: Elliott 254 



By CAPT. 



Open the entire year, 
and In touch with 
latest requirements. 
Candidates thoroughly 
prepared for License 
of any grade; Master, 
Mate or Pilot; Ocean, 
Coast or Inland, 



W. J. SMITH, 
Nautical Expert, 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical College, 
Licensed Master of Ocean steam and 
sail vessels (unlimited), and Master 
and Pilot for Inland waters. Author of 
"Self-Instructor in Navigation," Author 
of "Practical Compass Adjustment." 
Compass Adjuster. 

507 MARITIME BUILDING 
911 Western Ave., SEATTLE, Wash. 

Phones: 
School, Main 3300. Res. Queen Anne 664 





SMOKB 




The 


"Popular Favorite," the ' 


Little 


Beauty," the "Princess" and 


other 


high 


grade union -made cigars. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 




532 


Second Street - - Eureka 


, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG 
Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilla and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
.Mso bottlers and dealers In Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



ALASKA HOTEL 

Corner Western and Seneca 

The newest 25-cent house in town. 

New building, new furniture. 

Special attention to mariners. 

FREE BATHS 

Special Weekly Rates 

PETER DESMORE, Proprietor. 

Seattle, WoMh., Letter Lut. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Posiodlce, letters addressed in care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to call 
or have their mall forwarded during that 
period, they should notify the Agent to 
hold mall until arrival. 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St. 

Seattle, Wash. 



Herman Schulze 

- CIGAR MANUFACTURER - 
Cigars at Wholesale and Retail 

439 SECOND STREET 

Corner F EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only 



Vernon W. Buck Arthur C. McLane 

Carl G. Benson 

BUCK, BENSON & McLANE, 

Lawyers and Proctors In Admiralty 

Free .'\dvice to Seamen. 

1265 Empire Building, 

Seattle, Wash. 

Vi tala og skrifva de nordiska spraag. 



Jo- 



Aagaard, A. 
Abrahamsen, 

hannes 
Adalfsen, Oscar 
Andresen, Ingvald 
Anderson, Sam 
.\nderson, Halgar 

Thome 
.Anderson, Otto 
.■\ronsen. Half dan 
Alonzo, I. 



KneblikofC. I. 
I.acey, Thos. E. 
lyarson. Anton 
Larsen. Peter 
Larsen, Axel 
I>arsen, Henry 
Ijarsen, Eric J. 
Larsen, P. O. 
Lathi, J. H. 
T>ind. John 
Lievens. John 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squlre-Latlmer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



.\niler.son, Hjalmar Lindgren. L. 



;\nderson, Fred 
P.nushark, E. 
P.aam, R. 
Bakker, Hakow 
Rlair, Frank 
Poison, .Torgen 
Rnax, Henrlk 
BurRO.ss, M. 
Bonedlxon, Nick 
Rercntsen. Alfred 
Blommendal, J. 
Boyd, John 
CouRhlan, C. 
Christensen, H. T. 
Cotton. John 
Dickenson, D. 
Ponelly. J. H. 
Davidson, Jakob 
Dennett, .lohn 
Klsted, John 
F.rlandes. I/Ouls 
Eekhardt, Charley 
Eriksori. Edvard 
Fiek, John 
F.ielsted. K. M. 



M. 



Luhy, W. 
Ludwig, Jack 
Larson, E. G. 
Lorin, A. L. 
Lee. C. 
Martinsen. C. 
Mattson, Olaf 
Mabe, J. 

Martinsen. Ingvald 
Maat.son, Olaf 
Maniers. C. 
Magnusen, Lars 
Meisland. Hans 
Moller. J. R. 
Muir. .Tames 
Miller, James 
M.Trx. Thorvald 
Mait.nk. M. 
MrPher.son. .Tames 
MfCnrmaek, .T. 
McKeown. Thos. 
MeKittriek. J. 
Mikelsen. Peter 
Mikkel.sen. K. -1620 
Nelson. Rlrger 



Fredriksen. Berger Nielsen, H. J. 



Nilson. A. -902 
Nilsen. .Tack 
Nikander. A. E. 
Nolan, James 
Noshls, C. 
Nilson. Alfins 
Nel.son. Adolf 
Oberg. Oscar 
Oherbauser. John 
Oblson, Ben 
Olssen, Charles 
Olsen, C.ust 
Olsen, Hans P. 
Olsen, Trygue L. 
Olsen. Anton 
Otto. W. 
Owens, J. H. 
Oehmichen. Fred 



Frnmmes. Tvar 

Cehler, F. 

Cundersen. L. S. 

Oibbons, J. 

Oinis. G. 

Tlnnsen, H. O. 

lTan.>;en. Nels S. 

TTakonsen. Ingvar 

Hansen, Simon 

H.Tiult. W. 

TTallnoss. M. 

Hetrg, Martin 

TTolm, H. P. 

Hall, G. A. 

Tversen. Arthur 

Tves.sen, I. 

.Taeobson, A. John 

Jacobson. Johan 

Jacobson. .T. Martin Olsen, Nick 

Jensen, John G. Olsen. Edvln 

.Tensen, Jacob -419 Pederson. .Alfred 

Jensen. Hans Person. Charley 

-Tensen. .Tohn Plant. Rillie 

Johanson, H. Tobias J"'""'"'''- "'^1^;' 

Johnson. TTenrv Peder.son. John 

Johnson, n\ist-.' Powell. Gus 

Johnson, C. W. Rasmussen. R, 

.Tohnson, C. .L -1S06 Relnink. TL 

.Tohnsnn. Andrew Rosenwald. I 

.Tnhnnson, Einar 

.Tohansen. Aug. W, 

.Ton.spn, P. 

Jobanson. O. K. 

Kaiser, R. 

Tverr, Andrew 

Kermagorah, A. 

Kopatz, C. 



Tamke, Alfred 
Taylor, Ed. 
Tangeros. Ole 
Tliompson, Anton 
Thorsen, Torger 
Tessner, R. 
Wartnau, W. 
Werner. J. 
Wcdeking, W. 
Winzens, G. 



Zerkel, W. 
Zimmer, W. 

Registered Letter. 
Krager, F. 

Packages. 
Borjenson, C. A. 
Miller, L. 
Nilsen. L J. 
Petersen, M. 
Zeckel. W, 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates 

Front Street, between C and D 

EUREKA, CAL. 



For 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 

or 

A SQUARE MEAL 

Try 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



AMERICAN EXCHANGE HOTEL 
Headquarters for Scandinavians 

OLtJF KARLSEN. Proprietor 

GOOD BOARD AND LODGING 

By the Day, Week or Month. Meals 25c. 

First Street, between D and E 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Telephone Main 445 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

THE COSMOPOLITAN 

Furnished Rooms, Club Rooms, Bil- 
liard and Pool Tables, Reading Room 
with latest Swedish, Finn and Nor- 
wegian newspapers. 

BARBER SHOP 
125 D. St., Eureka, Cal. 

ED. SWANSON, Prop. 



Portland, Or., Letter List 

Erlck 



Anderson 

B. 
AndroHo, A. 
Anderson, Otto 
Alirams. Geo. 
Huckmer, — 
Brodig, — 
Balda. Alfonso 
Bergstrom, Paul 
Brodig, W. G. 
Blakstad, Charles 
Corty, C. 
Cordia, Peter 



Larsen. Engvald 
I.,ane, Charles 
Larsen, Soren 
Lerksher, Heinrich 
McMahon, Jack 
Mathisen, Harry 
Mattheu, J. 
Macrae, Alexander 
Matson, Ellis F. 
Meyer. Dick 
Morris, Frank 
Moninger, Joseph 
Neullng, Geo. A. 



Christensen, Peter Normen, John 



C. 

Colman, E. 
Dennis, Charles 
Dorff, William 
Dogroot, George 
Erickson, L. 
pjUgene, John 
Knglund, E. H. 
Engstrom, M. R. 



Norman, Ludwlg 
Nielson, Ed. 
Olsen, John A. 
Olsen, Andy 
Olsen, Severin 
Ohlsen, Charles 
Opheim, Lars 
Orlik. Joseph 
Pedersen, Rasmus 



Frederirkson, H. E. Petersen, Peter 



525 



R.-vtcliffe, L, 
Sack, J, -242.S 
Salonen, John 
Straus, W. 
Strand. Chas. 
Swenson, B. -1932 
Steen, T. C. 
Steen, Jens 



Fristrom. Ivar 
Gegnry, Jas. 
Grove, Al 
Galieberg. Martin 
Glaas, Waldemar 
Giannus, Alex. 
Heinas, Charles 
Hellsten, Gus 
Hiiltmaji, A. 
IlaKa. John A. 
Irwin, Robert 
.Taase, Warren 
Johnson, Jack 
Johnson, George 
Johnson, Chris 
Johnsen 
.Tohnsen, Ole 
Johnsen, John 
Jensen, Chris 
Johnson, Axel 
Johnson, H. 
Jensen. Robert 
Kealer, James 
Kutsberg. Gustaf 
Kenney, .Tames 
Kerrae. Fr, 
Lane, Chas. 
T,,eeh. Paul 
T,,arsson. John 
Lundqulst, A. 



Perouse, Andre 
Peterson, Maruets 
Post, A. 
Raetz, Aug. 
Rasmussen. R. Th. 
Roost. Otto 
Rasmussen. Pete 
Rennert, Fred H. 
Richter, Hans 
Rose, Luis C. 
Roche, John 
Sanders, Chas. 
Schmidt. Frits 
Smith. Ernest 
Shroder, Er. 
Halvor J. Sjoholm, W^aldemar 
Stephen. M. 
Swensson, John B. 
Splnessen, Kurwald 
Tamford, A. 
Turner, A. 
Turner, F. 
TTadren. G. F. 
Wall, A. 

Wenner. Edward 
Wold. Statius 
Wlckstrom, Gustav 
Young, Herbert 
Zunk, Bruno. 
Zimmerman, F. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN. 

San Francisco. 

Anderson, William 
Anderson, Agnes 
Anderson, Oscar 
l^arlson. Gust 
Erikson, John -86 
Erikson, Johan 
Gri.»s. Anton 
•lansson, Elias 



Knudsen, David 
I.,anberg, A. 
Lowberg, A. W. 
Nelson, M. 
Sandset, O. -117 
Smith, Phil 
Spooner, Soil 
Stromlierg. Erik 



When making purchases from our 
I advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



Johansen. S. Johan 'I'.TUson, Frank 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

Carl Herman Wesstrom, alias John 
Smith, aged 64, a native of Gothland, 
Sweden, last heard from at San 
Francisco, is inquired for by F. G. 
Klintberg, Point Reyes Life Saving 
Station, Cal. 

William Fayette White, whose 
mother died recently, is inquired for 
by his brother. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please address S. A. 
White, 106 W. Salem Ave., Roanoke, 
Va. 

Charles Olsen, No. 31, a member 
of the Sailors' Union, is urgently 
inquired for by his brother Chris- 
tian. Address Coast Seamen's Jour- 
nal. 

John Rcbbentad, who was in the 
.steamship Lukas in November, 1911, 
is inquired for by his brother. Ad- 
dress, Coast Seamen's Journal. 

John Kampe, born at Memel, Ger- 
many, who paid his last dues to the 
Sailors' Union on August 26, 1905, 
at Seattle, Wash., is inquired for by 
the German Consul at San Francisco, 
California. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 
HUOTARI & CO. 

Gents' Furnishings, Boots and Shoes 

Groceries and Notions 
We sell everything, and sell at right 
prices. Union-made Goods Specialty 

You Know the Place 
320 S. F. St., near Sailors' Union Hall 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service 
Phone 691 



At 



Stand: 
Sailors' Union Office 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



.WORKERS UNIONy 



UNIOIWfsrAMP 

Factoty 



Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 




Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



ROYAL CIGAR STORE 

Headquarters for Union-made Cigars 

and Tobacco. Red Seal Cigar a 

Specialty. The Place to get 

your Sea Stock. 

Agency for Gloss Union Steam 

Laundry. OLE LUND, Prop. 

S. E. Cor. of Herron and F Sts., 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 
Abreast of Sailors' Union Hall. 



When in Aberdeen Trade at 
BEE HIVE. 
Very best union made Hickey Shirts, 
Oil Clothing, Eureka Boots, Hats, Shoes, 
Underwear, Beddings, Tobaccos, and no- 
tions for seafaring men. 

JUKKA SAHLSTEIN 
304 South F St., Aberdeen, Wash. 
Near Sailors' Union Hall 
Open Evenings. 



OLD TOWN, TACOMA, WASH. 

hTiTmallek 

2320 NORTH 30th STREET 

Notice to our Customers: This place will be know/n as the "Red Front." 
Seamen's Outfitters, Shoes, Rubber Boots, "Saw/yer's" Oil Clothing, Flannel Shirts, 

Quilts, Blankets, Etc. 

"Boss of the Road" Overalls, 75c; Hickory Shirts, 50c; Everything Union Made. 

I will give you a square deal as I want your trade. 

Remember the "Red Front," one block north of Union Hall, Old Town. 



THE PIONEER 

Union Made Cigars and Tobacco 

a Specialty 

Wholesale and Retail 

Pool and Billiards 

412 Herron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

G. L. WILLISCRAFT, Prop. 



Headquarters for 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods 

Boots, Shoes, Hats, Etc. 

ALEXANDER'S WHITE HOUSE 

403 East Heron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

next to Burnett's Jewelry Store 

Phone 342 Box 843 

HOTEL OXFORD 

JOHN GRONOW, Prop. 

Rooms by the week $1.50 up. 

208-12 HERRON STREET 

Aberdeen, Washington 



PORTLAND, OR. 

WM. JOHNSON 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 

For Quick Service Call East 4441. Resi- 
dence Phone Tabor 3. I give you a Claim 
Check for your baggage at home. Give 
nie your work or we both lose money. 

Office: 
41 UNION AVE. - - PORTLAND, ORE. 

P. ROSENSTEIN J. G. WOOD 

Workingmen's Store 

Importers and Dealers in 
FINE CUSTOIVI AND READY MADE 

CLOTHING • 

Gent's Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, Etc. 
23 N. 3d St., nr. Burnside, Portland, Ore. 
Tel. Main 8295 ROSENSTEIN BROS. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Nik Gustof Svanberg Nelson, born 



Albert B. 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 

FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made CIGARS, 
TOBACCO, ETC. Call at his old Red 
Stand on Water Street, Port Townsend. 
Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 
around the corner from the Union Office. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In LIVE 
STOCK, FRESH MEATS AND VEG- 
ETABLES. Shipping supplied at 
lowest rates. :: Port Townsend, Wash. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Pres. 

Port Townsend Mercantile Co. 

(Inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED 
311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: 
Bartlett Wharf, Port Townsend, Wash. 



Tacoma, Wash., Letter List. 

Edward Jansson, John -2203 
Kesber, Karl 
Kirwan, Milton L. 
Knappe, Adolph 
Loren, A. L. 
Martin, Louis -1868 
Marikwardt, Carl 
Munster, Fritz 
Nielsen, C. V. 
Olsen, Martin 
Peterson, F. 
Sovig, Martin 
Swanson, Ben 
Veckenstedt, W. 



Anderson 

-1739 
Anderson 

-1568 
Anderson, Max 
Bausback, Erwin 
Behrins, Emll 
Benson, Charles 
Bloom, Charles 
Buckland, W:n. 
Carson, James 
Christensen, Albert 
Erikson, John 
Fors, Alfred 

Gronstrom, WilhelmWeerman, Wm 
Grove, Albert Zornig, Arthur 

Gustafson, Axel 

Eureka, CaL, Letter List. 

Alexander, G. L. Lindblom, Ernest 

Anderson, Otto Menz, Paul 

Benson, S. Menneky, Fred 

Carlson, Gust Nilson, Andrew G. 

Christensen, O. M. Nilsen, Julius 



Frykln, Gust 
Gottberg, Henry 
Grant, John 
Gulllksen, Lars C 
Hansen, Hans 
Hansen, J. P. 
Hass, H. 
Horlin, Ernest 
Ivars, Cal. 
Jacobsen, Edy 
Johnson, A. 
Johnsen, Arthur 
Johnson, Halvord 
Jensen, Fredrik 
Lane, Dick 
Larsen. K. L. 
Langevid. Emest 



Ogren, Harry 
Olsen, C. 
Paludan, Chas. 
Pedersen, Paul 
Pedersen, Martin 
Petterson, Oskar 
Ramsted, A. 
Rawke, Fred O. 
Sinyard, Walter 
Thomas, Joseph W. 
Thompson, Andrew 
Thoresen, Jens 
Wacksmann, Hans 
Wilson, John 
Wallen, L. 
Zebe, Gustav 



THE RED FRONT 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, ETC. 
Union Label Goods 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer In 

Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits 

315 Water St., next to Commercial Bank 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



RAYMOND, WASH. 

THE OLYMPIC CLUB 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, POOL 
and BILLIARDS 

All Daily Papers — Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 

RAYMOND WASHINGTON 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Richard Ryan, who left the British 
steamship Candida at San Francisco 
in July last, is inquired for by the 
British Consur-General. 

Lott Bartlett Walls, who has been 
sailing for years between San Fran- 
cisco and China, is inquired for by 
his brother, John M. Walls, 2721 
Thomas street, St. Louis, Mo. 



in Roguna Jamtland, Sweden, 44 
years of age, light brown hair, blue 
eyes, dark beard, last heard of on 
Standard Oil Company's ship Mat- 
toppa, is inquired for by his sister. 
Miss Elise Svanberg, 3953 Twen- 
tieth street, San Francisco, Cal. 

William McGrail, of Baltimore, 
Md., who sailed on the Atlantic and 
Gulf Coasts as cook for a number of 
years, is inquired for by his brother, 
George McGrail, 603 Decatur street, 
New Orleans, La. 

The following men, who made 
the trip on the bark Annie Johnson, 
leaving San Francisco on March 21, 
1910, and were paid off at San 
Francisco on June 1, 1910, are in- 
quired for by the Matson Naviga- 
tion Company, San Francisco: Ed. 
Benson, Norway, S3 years, A. B.; 
Nils Johansson, Sweden, 56 years, 
A. B.; Angelino Probaste, Chile, 30 
years, A. B.; F. Sunence, Norway, 
34 years, second mate; R. Kurella, 
Germany, 45 years, carpenter; Her- 
man Johnson, Sweden, 32 years, A. 
B.; P. Allen, France, 40 years, A. B.; 
W. Ellingsen, Sweden, 21 years, A. 
B.; Axel Henriks, Finland, 27 years, 
A. B. The first three named men 
made the round trip and were paid 
ofif in San Francisco, and the last 
six were paid off in Honolulu. 

Andrew John Anderson, who left 
Aberdeen, Wash., on lumber barge 
Washtura for San Francisco, is in- 
quired for. Any one knowing his 
present whereabouts please notify 
Mrs. Anna Anderson, Aberdeen, 
Wash. 

Salvage money is due to the follow- 
ing seamen, who were members of the 
crew of the steamer Washtenaw, when 
assistance was rendered to a British 
vessel, Leicester Castle, off the east 
coast of South America, during Octo- 
ber, 1908: A. Nessrig, H. Hansen, C. 
Johansen, R. Lewis, C. Alsager, E. 
Erickson, R. Ross, C. Anderson, S. 
Anderson, W. H. Crane, S. Johnson 
and A. Bosbury. Apply to Manager 
Marine Department, Union Oil Co., 
San Francisco. 

Will any of the crew of the John 
Palmer on the voyage from Aus- 
tralia to San Francisco or Pacific 
Coast port last year please call on 
or communicate with F. R. Wall, 
I 324 Merchants' Exchange, San Fran- 
I Cisco, telephone Kearny 394? 



'razil has decided to postpone the 
construction of the third scout, the 
Ceara, for financial rea.sons. 

The French armored cruiser Du- 
puy de Lome, which has been sold to 
Peru, has been re-named the coman- 
dante Aguirre. 

The British Admiralty has decided 
that, as soon as practicable, every 
battleship shall carry at least one 
20-ft. motor boat. 

It is reported that the President 
is preparing to call a special ses- 
sion of Congress to consider armed 
intervention in Mexico. 

Major John Miller Carson, for- 
mer chief of the Bureau of Manu- 
factures of the Department of Com- 
merce and Labor, died at Philadel- 
phia on September 29. 

The torpodo-boat destroyer Whip- 
ple arrived at San Diego on Septem- 
ber 29, making a record run from 
Santa Barbara Channel, covering the 
distance in five hours. 

Captain Henry Richardson and his 
crew of sixteen narrowly escaped 
death on September 27 when the 
steamer Culligan sank in Lake Supe- 
rior, twenty miles west of Grand 
Island. 

Germany is linking up by wireless 
telegraphy her possessions in the Pa- 
cific. Two large coastal stations are 
being erected in New Guinea, one in 
Samoa, and one in Nauru on Pleas- 
ant Island. 

Rear-Admiral Lucien Young, for- 
merly captain of the Mare Island 
Navy Yard, died at New York on 
October 1 after a brief illness. A 
ruptured blood vessel was given as 
the cause of death. 

Portugal has made up her mind to 
enter the Dreadnought arena, and 
the Armstrong- Vickers group are to 
divide the orders for three of these 
vessels, three scout cruisers, twenty 
destroyers and six submarines. 

Five thousand eight hundred and 
tliirty-four vessels of 2,461,717 regis- 
tered tons entered the port of Stet- 
tin, Germany, in 1911, against 5,486 
vessels of 2,063,010 registered tons 
in 1910, and 5,017 vessels of 1,958,- 
698 registered tons in 1909. 

In addition to four oil-carrying 
ships driven by internal combustion 
engines, which are to be built at the 
Government dockyards, the British 
Admiralty is about to contract with 
private firms for the construction of 
another four vessels of the type, 
two of them with a capacity of about 
10,000 tons. 

Headed by the flagship Connecti- 
cut, bearing the pennant of Rear-Ad- 
miral Hugo Osterhaus, 10 warships 
steamed up New York Bay on Octo- 
ber 6, the backbone of the battleship 
division in the naval gathering of 
which the harbor was to be Ihe scene 
for the next 10 days. With the (lag- 
ship were the battleships Ohio, New 
Jersey, Rhode Island, Nebraska, 
Kansas, Louisiana, Delaware, Utah 
and Florida. 

The regulations hitherto in force 
in New Zealand governing the car- 
riage of deck cargo and live stock 
on the decks of vessels arc reported 
have been amended somewhat. 



I Wh^n making purchases from our 
I advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



to 

Cargo may now be carried only on 
the main deck and the deck im- 
mediately above. Superintendents of 
mercantile marine in New Zealand 
are also empowered to restrict the 
number of live stock that may be 
carried on deck to a number less 
than that previously provided for. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




China has rejected the i)roposecl 
international loan of $350,000,000. 

The I'ir.st review ever held of a 
complete aeroplane armada took 
place Septemlier 21 in Villacoublay, 
France. 

Rev. .Augustus Orlebar, who was 
the original for Hughes' "■Tom 
Brown" in the fight witli slugger 
Williams, is dead at the age of 88. 

.\ great gathering took place at 
Shell Park, Liverpool, on September 
30, to protest against home rule in 
Ireland. The Assembly numbered 
not less than 100,000. 

An engagement has taken place 
south of ITarmanIi, a Bulgarian town 
thirty-seven miles north of Adriano- 
ple. The casualty list is placed at 
400 killed. 

Hundreds of lives were lost, 
scores of persons were injured and 
damage exceeding $20,000,000 was 
caused in the typhoon which swept 
Japan from end to end on Septem- 
ber 29. 

A cable message calling upon Bul- 
garians and Macedonians in this 
country to return home, was posted 
at the head(|uarters of the "Macedo- 
nian-Bulgarian Organization" in New 
York. 

A joint demand upon China for 
the immediate payment of arrears 
on the Bo.xer indemnity amounting 
to $50,000,000 has been proposed by 
Russia to the other five interested 
powers. 

The Greek Government has pur- 
chased four torpedo boats under 
construction on the Mersey from the 
.-Xrgentine Government. One of the 
vessels is ready to sail and the others 
are to be finished in a few days. 

Severe fighting between Turkish 
and Servian troops is reported to 
have occurred on the southeastern 
frontier of Servia. The Turks are 
said to have lost thirty killed and 
many wounded; Servian casualties, 
two killed and eighteen wounded. 

A great hunger sti-ike by women 
throughout Great Britain is the new 
move which Mary Gawthorpe, in a 
letter to a newspaper, proposed to 
initiate if the Government continues 
to ignore the suflfragettes' demands 
during the Parliamentary session. 

A seaman who died aboard the 
bark Fue Heng Suey, arrived at New 
York October 6, 136 days from 
Honolulu, has been identified as 
Louis Spitzer, the famous blockade 
runner, gentleinan adventurer, last of 
the American privateer skippers. 

The Italian navy will play a prom- 
inent role in the event of war in 
the Balkans, indirectly aiding the 
Balkan coalition by preventing Tur- 
key from moving troops out of Asia 
Minor. To this end the Italian 
fleet will keep its full strength in 
the vicinity of the Aegean Sea. 

The first large commercial crop of 
the infant Hawaiian Tobacco indus- 
try was destroyed by fire last week 
when the storage sheds of several 
companies on Hawaii went up in 
smoke. The loss is placed at $40,- 



San Francisco Letter List. 

Letters at the San Francisco Sailors, 
t'nion Onice are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail is advertised In 
these columns should at once notify 
P. Sella rrenherg, Headquarters Sailors' 
Union, San Francisco, to forward same 
to the port of their destination. 



Aga, J. 
-Alander, J. 
Alf 

Alltinson, S. 
Allen. J. M. 
Ailornian. I']. 
.Anders, F. 
Andersen, -1526 
Andfrsen -1C20 
Andersen -735 
.Andersen, C. 
Anderson. S. 
.Anderson, G. 
Anderson -1772 
Anderson, -992 
Anderson, -922 

Baore, H. 
Bahr, F. 
Hakker. H. 
Bang, M. 
Hardsen, J. 
Rarton. W. 
Rath. C. 
Rausback. E. 
Baxter, E. 
Beck, E. 
Rehr, Henry 
Rplrsen, A. 
B.-kker. Ch. 
Bengrtson. M. 
Benson, G. 
Bergman, L. J. 
BerKen, P. 
Berssten. R. 
BerKstrom, A. 
Berlin, W. 
Bernhardsen, C. 
Beugh, L. B. 
Bianca. F. 
Billington, M. 

Caen, O. 
Callan, J. 
C.Tplinger, O. 
CarLsen. C. 
Carlstrom. G. 
Carlstrum, J. 
Ceas}-, E. 
Chaler, B. 
Cherniav.sky, M. 
Christensen, H. 
Pahlgren. P. 
Dahlin, G. 
Haragher, J. 
'•arwin. Richard 
Day, H. 
Davlor, W. J. 
DeBaere, H. 
Dempsey, H. 
nevany, D. 
Fjaston, R. 
Ktken, M. 
i-/dnerton, J. 
Edwards, D. 
Ed wards, J. 
Edwardsen. J. 
Kpelhoff, F. 
Rhlert. A. 
Einardt, J. 
Ek, C. 
Fager, J. 
Farnen, W. 
Faulkner. J. 
Figved, S. 
Finck. J. 
Fischer, P. 
F'jellman, J. 
Geggus, Ch.- 
Ganzalez. D. 
Gerner, H. 
(^'.illliolm, A. 
Gjardahl S. 
GflMia. O. 
Goodrlge, M. 
Gorgensen, A. 
Gower. J. 
Gray, A. 

Haktin, E. 
Hallenberg, 
Ilalvorsen, A. 
Halvorsen, H. 
Ilannus, A. 
llannus, M. 
A. H., -lfi.->n 
Hanson, B. 
Hansen, Ch. G. 
Hansen, C. M. 
Hanson -2].'?S 
Hansen, H. 
Hansen, H. O. 
Hansen, H. P. 
Hanson. J. A. .1. 
Hanson, J. 
Hansen, J. M. 
Hansen, L. 
Hansen. IV. 
Hansen, O. 

Illlg, G. 
Illman. T. 
Inberg, J. E. 

Jacobsen, Ole 
Jacobson, J. 
.Jakahson, P. 
.lanotf. A. 
Janson. Fr. 
Jennings, G. 
.leii.-jen. <■. E. 
.lensen, F. 
.lensen. -2062 
.lensen, J. 
•feppson. P. 



E. 



entire 1911 crop. 

Spain is probably the only country 
in the world which possesses a ducal 
strike-breaker. The Duke of Sara- 
gossa telegraphed the Government 
last week, ofTering to run a daily 
express train from Madrid. The 
oflFer was accepted. The duke is an 
expert locomotive engineer and has 
often driven King Alfonso's trains. 
Other prominent men have oflFered 
their help against the strikers. 



000 and includes the value of the ''^'^^<^'^- '^• 

Jospersen, M. 
.lohansen. Hans 
.lohansen, G. W. 
.lohansen, K. 
.lohansen, Th. 

Kahlberg. W. 
Kallas, M. 
Iv.illasmann, E. 
Kallos, J. 
Karlson. R. 
Karlson, S. 
Karlsson, E. 
Kerl.s.son, E. 
Ivarlsson, -1442 
Kiolman, J. 
Kilpatrlrk. C. 
Klahn, Ch. 
iOarsen, A. 
Kleppe, T. 
Klick, A. 



Anderson, A. 
Anderson, A. P. 
Anilerson, Friz 
-Anderson, K. O. 
Anderson, Oscar 
Anderson, S. P. 
Anderson, V. 
Andorsson -1778 
.Andersson, I.,. 
Andreassen, -1130 
.Anis. .). 

Appelquist. Otto 
Arbrioks. A. 
Aspe, W. 
Austin, T. 



Bingiiam, T. 
Bjerk, G. 
BJornstad. M. 
Blachburn. G. 
Blaek. .1. 
Black, V. 
Bllkshaven, S. 
Block. W. 
Blomberg, G. 
Borgesen. H. 
Bowers. G. 
Bradley, A. 
Bragge, H. 
Brander. V. 
Brans, S. 
Hrofieiibach. .A. 
Bredesen, J. 
Broiuiar, — . 
Briggs, J. 
Bruce, O. 
Bruin. B. 
Bryde. Ch. 
Bulb. E. 

Christensen, t>. P. 
< 'liriston.>--pn. S. 
Christophersen, F. 
Classen, H. 
Clausen. J. 
Clever, H. 
Collins. F. 
Corneliussun, L. 
Cranby, .1. 
Curtis, R. 
Dobbs. W. 
Dobrlck. J. 
Dockrell, W. 
Donelly. W. 
Dornquist, O. 
nouglas, K. H. 
Drkcar, E. 
Dreger. J. 
Duis. J. 
Ekendahl. W. 
Eliassen, S. 
Ellingsen, I. 
Egeland. Olaf 
Engelhard. F. 
Erdmann. B. .1. 
Erickson. G. 
Erickson, E. 
Evans. E. 
Evensen, L. 
Flem, K. 
Flemens. P. 
Forsgren, K. 
Fox. R. 

Froderiksen, B. 
Fredrikstad 



R. 



Gregory. P. 
Groschefskie, F. 
Gudding, A. 
Gueno. P. 
Gundersen -785 
Guntcr, M. 
Gustafson, .1. 
Gusek. B. 
fiiitman, H. 



lianson. K. E. 
Hanssen, -1867. 
Harjes. Albert 
Harrhorson, H. 
Hartog, .1 
Hatter. W. 
Haugen, L. 
Hoiberger, B. 
Helen. P. 
Jlenningrcn, C. 
Hennlngsen. C. 
Jlonriokson. Cli. 
Henriksen, J. 
Henrikson, H. 
Henze. A. 
Hermansson, -1622 
Hesche, H. 
Hllsen. Ingvald 
Hofgaard. H. 
House, J. 

Ivordtsen. S. B. 
Iversen, C. 
Iversen, R. 

.lohanson, -2186 
Johansson, J. 
Johnsen, J. 
Johnsen, P. 
.lolmson. Alrik 
Johnson, E. S. 
Johnson, Geo C. 
Jolii^son. O. 
Johnson, W. 
Johnsson. -1452 
.lonos, H. 
Jordan, E. 
Jorgensen, A. 
.fortceiisiii. K. 
Jorgensen, -1840 
Jorgensen, T. 



O. 



Knudsen, B. 
Knudsen. I >. 
Kohlmeiste 
Kolbe. A. 
Koloston. J. 
Koop, F. 

Korsberg. Volmar 
Kramer. F. 
Krlle. B. 
Kristlansen. C. 
Kristoffersen. Olaf 
Kuhnert, W. 
Kvalvik. Oscar 
Kvassell. G. 
Kvestad, H. 



M. 



I.agerberg, Pete 
I..iinn. K. 
l-aizkowki, A. 
l-ange, P. 
l.apinsalo. O. 
I-ar.»en. E. 
l.ar.sen, H. 
I-arsen, H. M. 
T-arsen, J. 
Unson, C. H. 
r.arson. F. 
I.auritson. 
I.alwer. K. 
Leahy, W. 
Leidecker, E. 
I.orander. J. 
Maokey. H. 
Mackey, I. 
Magnussen. M. 
.Malising, W. 
Mainers, Ch. 
-Mansen, A. 
.\i.uison. M. 
Martin, H. 
Martinsen, I. 
Marthiassen. N. 
.Matliieson, L. 
Matthews, J. 
M.itsinger, 
Maves, J. D. 
M.I X nor. K. 
MrCallum, Ch. 
MoCormack, J. 
MeCoiirt, J. 
McFarland, J. M. 
McGahen. John 
McGune, .1. 
N'Mchtlgall, H. 
NVlsnn. A. B. 
Nelson. M. 
.Nelson -552 
.X'elson, W. 
.Vewman, A. 
.Nichols, F. 
Niederacher, 
Nielsen, A. 
.Nielsen. E. 
Nielsen, N. 
odeen, P. 
Oelerich. H. 
Ohlsen. -569 
Oilman, P. 
OI.ean. AV. 
Olsen. E. 
Olson. J. 
ol.sen. H. 



L. 



P. 



Lerstcrn, J. O. 
O. 

Liiid, G. 
I.indrolh. M 
Linrusi, J. 
T^owberg, A. 
I.ude, J. 
Lude. T. 
Ludwig. E. 
Lund, -5!l!) 
Lunde, Ole 
Lundgren. B. 
I-undin, -lO.'il 
l.iindriuist. H W. 
Lynch, J. -1586 

McKoating. R. 
McKeowen. 'I'h 
McMahon. J. T. 
Mectors, G. 
Melbv. O. 
Me.sak. !•:. 
Meyer. Ch. 
Meyer. 10. 
Meyer, M. 
Minter. 
Moen, H. 
Moen, R. 
Mohr, E. 
Momson. D. 

Lr.) 
Morrison, D. 
Muller. W. 
Murphy, J. A. 
Murphy. Michael 
Mynchmyor. 11. 

Nielsen, O. 

Nielsen. W. A. 'I 
Nikandor. 1), 
Nil.sen. H. 
-Nllsson, -1137 
Nisson, L. 
Nolan. G. S. 
Nordstrom. J. 
Norris. E. 
Norris. N. 
Nurgi. Peter 
Olsen, T. 
Olsen, AV. 
Olson, A. 
Olson, B. 
Olson. -.'•)62 
Olsson. O. -niO 
Olsson. G. M. 
O'Neill. J. 



Olsen. t'scar Efralm Opdorbcck 
Olsen, S. 



P.ackham. T. 
I'agel. -1216 
Papei.joglon. C. 
Pearson, A. 
I'earson, J. 
I'edeisnn, -1392 
Pelz, G. 
I'erkins, F. 
Peron. Edmond 
I'erron, ^. 
Perry. D. 
Peters, J. 
Petersen, A. R. 
Petersen, C. 
Petersen, -721 
T'etersen, H. 
Quezada, E. 
Ilandroppe, J. 
liasmussen, -497 
Rasmussen, E. 
Rasmussen, H. 
Ua.-^iniissen -980 
liasmussen. J. 
Kausche. Enill 
Reinier, P. 
Keinhnld. Ernst 
itesvoll, P. P. 
Sabels, F. 
.Sand, -2113 
Sanne, R. 
Sandset, O. 
.Santos. J. 
Sato, E. 
Schane. J. 
Schei, T. E. 
Schevig, B. 
Schlachter 
.Schneider. H. 
.•^choll, K. 
Schrej, G. W. 
.Schroder, F. 
Schroder. H. 
.Schuster, J. 
Soagnen. J. 
Soehusen. C. 
Selander, A. 
Sengen, G. 
Sergeys, M. L. 
Siovert. H. 
Simonsen, S. 
Thomas, H. 
Thomson, P. 
Thorssell, F. N. 
Thorsen, J. 
Toegersen, -TUS 
Tollefsen, A. 
Valles. A. 
Van Dusen. H. 
A"onoma, H. 
AValniar, E. 
Walters. Albert B 
Waiti, J. 
AVecliinann, P. 
Welirtens. H. 
AA'endel. E. 
Wergaard. J. 
Werner, Ch. 
West, H. 
AVetzel, M. 
Wiberg, J. E. 
Wickstrom 
Youngberg, H. 
Zechel, W. 



Peterson, J. G. 
Petersen. O. 
Peterson. J. 
Peterson, -1389 
Pettersen. -1154 
Pettorsen -1237 
Pettersson. E. 
Phillips, Geo. 
Piroise, E. 
Viterick. H. 
yittman, A. 
Plottner, F. 
Poolies, I.,. 
Poppe, G. 
Posa, T. 

Quigley. R. 
Richardsen. C. 
Riegel, W. 
Riley. R. H. 
P. Rippe. R. 
Roche, J. 
Rosbeck, G. 
Uosmalen. C. 
Koss, O. 
Rudlierg. Chas 
Rund. H. 
.Sjoblom, K. 
Sjogren, J. 
Smith, Ch. 
Smith, J. V. 
Sonnenberg. J. 
Sorger. E. 
Sparks, A. 
Spritsen. H. 
Stahlliauni. E. 
Stangeland, P. 
Stoan. Ch. 
Steenro.ss, — . 
Stein, -2099 
Stendhahn. F. 
Sting, Ch. 
Storm, Th. 
Strand, Ch. 
Strand. O. 
Sundberg, C. 
.Sundberg. R. 
Sundquist, E. 
.Svonssen, J. 

Torkildscn, M. 
Toinkvist. M. 
Townsenil. R. 
Tronsen, .J. M. 
'I'uppitz, E. 

A'ioreck, H. 
Vllhelmson. S. 

Wilen, J. 
Williamson, W. 
AVilsen, J. 
Winblad, M. 
AVinter, G. 
AVinther. Hans 
AVhito. G. 
AA'oUlhou.so. 
Wolter. J. 
AVerk. F. 
AVork, J. 



Zunk, B. 



J. 



Jenkins, Fred Pcdersen, J. -US.S 

.loosen. -2110 Priebcrg. P. 

.lohanssoii, -Hull 1 Punls, T. 

Johnson, J. N.. -2161 Uasmussen, E. 
lorcensen. Oluv Stolt, A. J. 



Kallberg, C. 
Marten, H. 
Mersman. A. 
Norris. Ed. 
Ol.sen, O. 



Sullivaji. John 
Thoresen, J. 
Tupplts. 
AValters. A. 
Waltti. H. 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Alexander. A. E. 
Andorsson, Ernest 
Anderson, Axel 
.Andre, Fred 
.Antonsen, John 
Aniler.son -1420 
Aulto -1780 
Bakker, Haakon 
Brancler, Wm. 
Coldwell, J. 
Clausen. Fred 
Cristiansen, O. M. 
I'reger, John 
Dickenson. Klchard 
Elenius, Axel 
Kllergaard, M. 
Gewold ^i. u. 
Graf, Otto 
Hansen. Jack 
Holm, Hans 
Hakiinssen, C. 
Hanssen. H. 
Herman. Axel 
Iverdtsen, S. B. 
Ingobrethsen. John 

A. 
Folia nnessen, J. H. 
lenson. J. F. 
lanes. Harvey 
lohnsen. Karl 
•lensen, George 
.lacohsen, -1486 
lohannson, -2077 
Johansson, C. R. 
Jor.qensen, Peder 
Johansson, C. A. 
Knudsen, B. 
Kallas. August 
Lindholm, C. 
I..oining, Herman 
Lanistsen, George 



Lundgron, K. B. 
Louis, B. J. 
Larsen. Johan 
l.indroos, A. W. 
MacManus, Hugh 
MacPherson. Fioberl 
Martin, John B. 
Mattson, K. A. 
oksanen. Juko 
Olsson, Fred 
T'eiitz. Otto 
Pedersen -1054 
Pearson, Charles 
Petersen, Christian 
Robertson, A. 
Rudt 

Uosenfeld. Paul 
Rasehlun. Franz 
Sundnian. Emil 
Siren, Frans 
Strom, -2340 
Siven, Wlktor 
Schneider, H. 
.Sandby, James 
Schevig, A. B. 
Strasdin, IL 
Tollefsen, Andreas 
Tvede, Jens 
Vejada, -190 
Weber, AValter 
Wilson, P. S. 

PACKAGER. 
Anderson -1283 
Glaff, Otto 
Hansen, John 
Julius, P. 
l/ohtinen Kaarlo 
Otto -1780 
Pedersen. Peder 
Polison, Tom 
■Uggia, Fred. 



MARINE COOKS' LETTER LIST 
Seattle, Wash. 



Adams, H. 
Andraca, AU. 
Baker. J. 
Bailey, Wm. 
Barboner. G. N. 
Barker. A. E. 
Bridges, Noel 
Cahlll. John 
Champion, Eric 
Claer, Harry 
P'e Bruin, Tac 
Earl. A. 

Engstrom. Swan 
Flones. Fortunda 
fJandy. Jas. 
Gray. R. 
Hardy, Jack 
Howard. Jas. 



Kenealy, E. 
King, R. G. 
Mills, Geo. 
Meyer. Julius 
Mongan, H. E. 
McMullen. T. J. 
Nielsen, Peter S. 
Pestell. Stiinley 
Piers, Claude 
Redfern, R. 
Rollan. M. 
Smithers. J. 
Smith, Marcus 
Snleder. G. J. 
Stacy, Frank 
Thayer. Chas. 
Third. B. 
TInoco, Joe 



PACKAGES 

Apply to Secretary of Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific. 



Apple. A. 
Andersen. A. 
Balda. A. 
Berlin, W. 
Rlirhnvn. S. 
Block. Wm. 
Burgqulst, G. A. 



Chrlstoffersen, 

Evensen, M. 
Guntlier. J. 
Hall, G. A. 
Halvorsen, H. 
Hansen. Karl 
Hartmere -1245 



Olof 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Paul Edmund Fictsch is imjuired 
for by relatives. Address, Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 

Charles Edward Latham, native of 
Auckland, N. Z., age 23, last heard 
of at Callao, September, 1911, is in- 
quired for by his brother. Address, 
Henry Thomas (No. 550), Sailors' 
Union of the Pacific. San Francisco, 
Cal 

Bernard A. Lindholm, No. 891, a 
member of the Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific, is inquired for by his mother. 

Fred (Albin) Swanson, a native of 
Malmo, Sweden, aged about 25, is 
iiujuircd for. Address, Coast Sea- 
nun's Journal. 

.Mexander Benson, a native of St. 
Johns, N. F., supposed to be on Pa- 
cific .Slope, is inquired for by his 
mother. .Any one knowing his pres- 
ent whereabouts please communicate 
with Mrs. A. Benson, Kings Bridge 
St. Johns, N. F. 

ROBERT ROLLO'S 
Watch Club 

WATCHES, CHAINS, RINGS, 
PINS, DIAMONDS 

And all other precious stones at very 
reasonable prices. 

.Ml watch repairing guaranteed 2 years 

506 Market Street, San Francisco 

Office Hours Saturdays, 7 to 8 p. m. 



THE HARBOR HOTEL 

Formerly "The Mohawk" 

132 EAST STREET 

Opposite Ferry 

STEAM HEAT, HOT AND COLD 

WATER IN EVERY ROOM 



F.lcvator Service Free Baths 

.uid a Large Reading Room 

Rates: 

$2.00 PER WEEK AND UP 

50c PER DAY AND UP 

T. L. SELCHAIT P. N. NANSEN 

Proprietors 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY -AT- LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and IVlarket Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 

(THE GERMAN BANK) 

Savings Incorporated 1868 Commercial 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

(Member of the Associated Savings 

Banks of San Francisco.) 
The following Branches for Receipt 
and Payment of Deposits only: 

MISSION BRANCH, 2572 Mission St., 
between 21st and 22nd. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, 601 
Clement St., corner 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, 1456 
Haiglit St., near Masonic Ave. 

June 29th, 1912: 

Assets $51,140,101.75 

Capital actually paid up in 

Cash 1,000.000.00 

Reserve and Contingent 

Funds 1,056.403.80 

ICniployees" Pension Fund.... 140,109.00 
Number of Depositors 56,609 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock A. M. to 3 
o'clock P. M., except Saturdays to 12 
o'clock M. and Saturday evenings from 
6:30 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. M., 
for receipt of deposits only. 



DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
$2 to $2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bells and Hot and Cold Water in 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager. 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front St. and Broadway, op- 
posite Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier 
400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c 
per niglit up; $1.25 week; $5.00 
month. Baths, Reading Room. Office 
open all night. Best place near 
waterfront. Investigate. 



HOTEL SANTA FE 

684 FOLSOM STREET 
Near Third Street 

100 all sunny furnished rooms. Elec- 
tric light, hot and cold water. Rates, 
25c to 75c per day, $1.50 to $3.00 per 
week. Baths. Phone Home J 4230. Open 
all night. 

Phone Kearny 2503 

HOTEL COLCHESTER 

259 East St., Cor. of Jackson 
Rates: 30c per Day up, $1.75 per 
Week up. 

Hot and Cold Water In Every Room. 
Free Baths and Showers. 



PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 
We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 
Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia— All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Union Label Paper and Envelopes 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

Union-made Shoes 

HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING 

GOODS, ETC. 
Fair Prices. Reliable Goods. 

50 East St., and 4 Mission St.. 
San Francisco 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



UNITED STATES WATCH CLUB 

FINE WATCH REPAIRING 



E. F. COLLINS, Manager 



10 EAST STREET S. W. Corner Market 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Kelleher & Browne 

THE IRISH TAILORS 

716 MARKET— Opposite Third— 33 GEARY 

NEW FALL SUITINGS 

ALL SUITS ARE MADE IN OUR OWN 
SHOP BY SKILLED UNION TAILORS. 




They are paid by the week. 
No piece work. 
SUITS TO ORDER FROM $30.00 TO $50.00 

c;. BREINING, Marine Representative 



JORTALL BROS. EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 
206 EAST ST., San Francbco 

Phone Oougia* 5348 

INFORMATION WANTED. 



Furniture Moving by Motorcar 

San Francisco and 
Suburban Towns 



FORSMANN & HUSEBY 
55 Market St. Phone Douglas 4400 

Anchor House 

S. PETERSON, Prop. 

FURNISHED ROOMS 

Reading Room. Electric Lights. 
495 THIRD ST. San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5390 



C. Hansen, G. Oisen, J. Johnson 
and J. Nolan arc requested to call 
at the P. C. S. S. Co.'s office for 
money due for clothing lost in steam- 
er Queen. 

William Moran, who left Buffalo 
forty-two years ago, at the age of 
12 years, is inquired for by his 
sister. Address Mrs. Catherine Mo- 
ran I'"ossett, 421 Normal avenue, Buf- 
falo, N. Y. 

Charles Harold Allen, who has 
served as an apprentice in a British 
ship, age about 21 years, medium 
height, brown hair, last heard of in 
San Francisco November 9, 1911, is 
anxiously inquired for by his father. 
Please notify British Consul-General 
at San Francisco. 

Nils Nielsen, No. 204, a native of 
Norway, born 1862, on the Pacific 
Coast since 1892, was last in the S. 
S. Wilhelmina. Inquired for by Mrs. 
Lina Svensen, 852 Treat Ave., San 
Francisco. 

Will John O'Brien, Walter Sin- 
yard J. Halvossen, Fred Weber or 
W. Hansen, who were on the 
schooner "Albert Meyer" last Janu- 
ary when W. Blodsing got hurt 
leaving Santa Rosalia, please commu- 
nicate with F. R. Wall, attorney for 
Blodsing, at 324 Merchants' Ex- 
change, San Francisco. 

W. Kahlberg, No. 688, and C. Mon- 
.sen, No. 1964, are inquired for at 
the Standard Oil Company's office, 
at San Francisco. 

Nils Johnson, who was wrecked 
in the American bark Oasis, Sept. 2, 
1887, is inquired for by W. F. Ho- 
hcnschild, Berkeley, Cal. 

Duncan Carmichael, a native of 
Glasgow, last heard of in San Fran- 
cisco about three years ago, is 
anxiously inquired for by his father. 
Address, Seamen's Institute, San 
Francisco. 

Fred Victor Ford, a native of Eng- 
land, aged 35, of medium height, is 
very anxiously inquired for by his 
mother and little daughter. Please 
notify British Consul General at San 
Francisco. 

Albert Smith, a native of Cork, Ire- 
land, who left the American ship 
John C. Meyer, on Feb. 20, 1911, 
is very anxiously inquired for by 
his wife. Please notify British Con- 
sul General at San Francisco. 



C. J. SWANSON 

CLASSY CLOTHIER 

HATTER AND FURNISHER 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

UNIFORMS 

Gold Braids and Gold Wreaths of 
.Ml Descriptions 

119 EAST STREET 

Between Merchant and Wasliington 

SAN FRANCISCO - CALIFORNIA 

Phone Douglas 1082 
Home Phone C-3486 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION riADC 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUf ACTURERS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Douglas 1660 




AT 



JOHNSOiM'S 

2358 MISSION ST. 
San Francisco 



Honolulu Letter List 



Amundsen, Albert 
Albrecht, Clarence 
Bredsen, John 
Berthold. Willy 
Christensen, Tlieo- 

dor 
Dou^la.s, Sam 
Darlin, Harry 
Uahlin. H. 
Ekstrom. Geo. 
Fredrlksen, Rudolf 
Greenace, Charles 
Hahn, John H. 
Hansen. L. 
Holm, H. John 



Langer, Itobert 
Lundguist, Alex. 
Matheson, Ijouia 
Munze, Dick 
Mol'hersoii. Louis 
Morsan. Hugh 
Nystrom. R 
Norris, Ned 
RooR, B. 

Rosbeok, Gu.stav 
Simonsen, Fred 
Saunders, Wm. .1. 
Slevert. Hcnnatin 
Swanson. Martin 
Smith, John 



AGENTS— $3.00 TO $9.00 PER DAY. 

Selling lii.tih-gi'adc Knives and 
Razors, with Photo liandles. ICxpcri- 
cnce unnecessary, we show you how 
to make money. Write for i)articu- 
lars and special outlU offer. United 
Ckillery Co., fiOO !•:. l''ourth St., Can- 
ton, Ohio. 

INFORMATION WANTED. 



W. A. Goodrich, who left the Brit- 
ish ship Puritan at San I'rancisco, 
February 6, 1911, is inquired ''or by 
the British Consul (kneral at San 
Francisco. 




TIu' W-rmont Legislature has elect- 
ed I'ictcher, Republican, as Governor. 

The Mississippi cotton yield this 
year is estimated at 1,200,000 bales, 
or practically the same as last year. 

The New York Democratic State 
Convention has nominated Congrcfs- 
nian William Sulzer for Governor. 

A. E. Chapman, the municipal tly 
catcher of Redlands, Cal.. has killed 
approximately 3,7.50.000 flics in 24 
(lays. 

Richard George, son of the late 
Henry George, died on September 28 
at the home of his brother-in-law, 
Richard Roberts, in Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Corporal I'rank S. Scott and Sec- 
ond Tj'cutenant Lewis C. Rockwell 
were killed by the falling of an acro- 
jdane at College Park, Md., on Sep- 
tember 28. 

John L. Longstaff, a former Eng- 
lish army officer, died from injuries 
received on September 28 while fly- 
ing with his mechanician at Hemp- 
stead, N. Y. 

J. Pierpont Morgan told the Senate 
Campaign Contributions Committee 
that he had contributed $180,000 to 
the last two Republican Presidential 
campaign funds. 

Out of the fifty-two California 
Presidential electors — thirteen each 
from the Prohibition, Socialist, Dem- 
ocratic and Progressive parties — ■ 
eleven are women. 

Judge Loren W. Collins, former 
Justice of the Minnesota Supreme 
Court, and a man of national note in 
the G. A. R., died at his home at 
Minneapolis on September 27. 

Professor Thaddeus S. C. Lowe, 
designer and builder of the Mount 
Lowe Railway, inventor of water gas 
and pioneer aeronaut, is near death 
at the home of his daughter, at Pasa- 
dena. 

The California Supreme Court has 
decided that only Roosevelt electors 
can go on ballot as Republicans; 
Taft \<)tcrs must choose between 
Wilson and Roosevelt or refr;iin from 
voting. 

l'"ivc thousand anti-vice crusaders 
paraded in the rain at Chicago on 
September 28, while 50,000 people 
crowded the line of march, in a 
iliMuonstration against conditions in 
the city's tenderloin. 

.\rrangements ha\e been liiade for 
the engraving and manufacturing of 
a scries of twelve stami)s, unique in 
size and nii\cl in design, for exclu- 
>i\'c use in forw.irding packages by 
ilic parcels post. 

I'lidcr the heading, "Mr. Hearst's 
I'orgcrics." the charge is made in the 
current number of Collier's Weekly 
that "certain of the fac simile Stand- 
ard Oil letters which are being pub- 
lished in Hearst's Magazine are 

Tuberculosis is the cause of more 
than 80 per cent, of the destitution 
in Xcw ^'ork, according to the re- 
sults of ;in investig.alion just con- 
cluded by the ;iss()ci;itioii for im- 
proving the condition of the poor. 
The 6.500 families that sonylit .aid of 
the association during the la--t year 
were made the b.asis of study. 

With butter selling at 41 cents a 
l)ound .-ind Hour .at $6 a barrel, the 
hotel men of New York recently de- 
cided that their patrons will h;ive to 
"come .across" and p.iy for their 
bread and bultei' nnw by the i)ortion. 
just as though it were .an entree, 10 
cents extra being the price agreed 
upon by members of the Hotel As- 
sociation. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 



Furious. — First Deaf Mute — He 
wasn't so very angry, was he? 

Second Deaf Mute — He was so 
wild that the words he used almost 
blistered his fingers. — Pittsburg 
Leader. 



Dr. Marcus Herz, of Berlin, once 
said to a patient who read medical 
books diligently in order to prescribe 
for himself: 

"Be careful, my friend. Some day 
you'll die of a misprint." — Youth's 
Companion. 



Safe. — Son — Papa, what is a safety 
match? 

Mr. Henpeck (looking carefully to 
see if his wife is within hearing). — 
A safety match, my son, is when 
a bald-headed man marries an arm- 
less woman. — Illustrated Bits. 



Got $2 Husband.— "I know a girl 
who made a $2 graduation gown and 
captured a husband on the strength 
of it." 

"That's a good argument for $2 
gowns." 

"The trouble is she caught a $2 
husband. He has expected her to 
dress on that precedent ever since." 
— Kansas City Journal. 



A Happy Married Life. — "I married 
a suffragette," said Cholmondely Rip- 
pingate of Hyde Park, "and for five 
years have found unspeakable hap- 
piness." 

"I'm glad to hear it," said the suf- 
fragette leader. 

"Yes," said Rippingate, "Mrs. Rip- 
pingate has been in jail four years 
and three months altogether." — Har- 
per's Weekly. 



Not Poor.— First Coster— Well, 
pore old Bill's gone. 

Second Coster (scornfully) — Pore, 
indeed! Luckiest bloke in the mar- 
ket. Couldn't touch nuflRnk wifout 
it turned to money. Insured 'is 
'ouse — burned in a month. Insured 
'isself agin haccidents — broke 'is arm 
fust week. Joined the burial society 
last Tuesday, and now 'e's 'opped it. 
Pore old Bill, indeed!— Punch. 



Children's Accounts 

Tour children should be taught to 
save. Open an account for each of 
them to-day. Show them by example 
that you believe In a savings account. 

They can not start too soon. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

783 MARKET STREET, near Fourth 
8an Francisco 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 
Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 
House, San Francisco, Cal. 
THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
Is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equip- 
ped with all modern appliances to Illustrate 
and teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation In the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always In view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and Is now. In addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how ignorant the seaman may be, even in the rudiments of 
common education. Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of Ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man. and in a 
comparatively short interval of time. WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY 





Agent U. S. Government Charts and Nau- 
tical Publications. Hydrographlc and Geodetic 

H. J. H. LORENZEN 

12 MARKET STREET 

Comer of Sacramento and Market Streets 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Dealer In 

Watches Chronometers Clocks 

Solid Gold Goods Diamonds 



MARINE & FIELD GLASSES 

NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 

EXPERT REPAIRING 

Watches, Chronometers and Jewelry 

Rates Determined by Transit Observations 

Chronometers and Sextants Rented 



J. COHEN S. CO. 

Baltimore ClotKing Co. 

72 EAST STREET, S. F., Next to SAILORS' UNION HALL 

Have Your Suit and Overcoat Made by Them. WHY? 
UNION LABEL IN COAT, VEST AND PANTS 

OUR CUSTOMERS ARE UNION MEN. WE SELL UNION MADE 

GOODS ONLY. 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 



When Drinking Beer 
See that this Label is 
on the Keg or Bottle 



S>> wo«*'»».^ ',^ 



Union J^^^ "Ale 

MADE l^^^fiS AND 

Beer l^^^ Porter 

^fe^ Of America r^ci^ 

COPYRIGHT &TRAOE HARK REGISTERED 1903 



Bagley's Navy 
Plug 

A FINE CHEW 
Give It a Trial 



luoni SyttjAuttantj ol th« -^^ ■G 





Eyes Examined Free 



^^ 



Repairing Our Specialty 



Jamts ^. Sorensen 

jy«« and Jz-ttfj. 



JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 

715 MARKET STREET - - - Near CaU Bldg. 

2593 MISSION STREET - - - Near 22nd St. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

The Largest Jewelry Store, with the Largest Stock, at 
the Lowest Prices 

ALL WATCH REPAIRING WARRANTED FOR TWO 
YEARS 



^1^1. fg ^^-^^ -g .^'W-^^'T^^ £7^ See that this label (in light 
^^[^^|C ^ l^r r"^ l^^^^^blue) appears on the box in 



which you are served. 



IStPl<880jl 



Isvjed by AuUioill/of me Ciga/ MiKers' Iniernatloful Union of America 

Union-made Cigars. 

3lliS (In1ifif;J. IW «• o^m^ oM»m miNj v>> im bait MM bya FIIS-QK MMUM 

jHlHtCROF THt OGMUAAEn'INTLRIuriOIUI UNION c/Amtki. 1a orulBiaboi d«voted tDtAaad 
MntHBiliiltlitlluWiMAILtWjrilhmaCIlUIWUIAMOfTHCOiArr. II»ittore««f « Ml l« 
Uttu C>94n U) til »ixAin UiroMriout Itit worid 






^ }1C (/ii/(Uu4. PKodent, 
V CUfUtfA 



. yS«s,>,Haii/iH5S*b-^i%'^5e»»><e9^y^!<6/.-*«^.-*«^ 



SHOP AT 



/^movalSaie) 
VCnow^ 

AND SAVE MONEY ON 
READY-TO-WEARS, 
MILLINERY, SILKS, 

DRESS GOODS, 

DOMESTICS, TOYS, 

HOUSE FURNISHINGS, 

MEN'S FURNISHINGS, 

FANCY GOODS, ART 

GOODS, NOTIONS, ETC. 



Busy now at Market and Sixth 
Streets. 

Busy soon at Market and Fifth 
Streets. 



LUNDSTROM HATS 

Are made in San Francisco and sold 
in 5 Stores: 

72 MARKET STREET 

1178 MARKET STREET 

605 KEARNY STREET 

2640 MISSION STREET 

26 THIRD STREET 

ALL UNION HATS 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



H, SAMUEL, 

Also known as Sam, 

610 THIRD STREET 

Between Townsend and Brannan Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Gents' Clothing 
and Furnishings 

Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Trunks, 
Valises, Bags. Etc., Boots, Shoes, Rubber 
Boots and Oil Clothing. Seamen's Out- 
tits a specialty. 

If you want flrst-class goods at the 
lowest market price, give us a call. Do 
not make a mistake — Look for the Name 
and Number. 



OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 



IS 






FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXVI, No. 6. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1912. 



Whole No. 2196. 



AWARD FOR SHORTAGE OF FOOD. 



That a "man must eat" at sea as well as 
on shore seems to be the unanimous opin- 
ion of the Federal Judges at San Fran- 
cisco. 

Two cases in which seamen sued to re- 
cover compensation because they did not 
receive the allowance of provisions to which 
they were entitled have just been decided 
in favor of the crew. Mr. F. R. Wall of 
San Francisco was attorney for the seamen 
in both instances. 

The first case was an appeal in the U. S. 
Circuit Court of Appeals, which affirmed 
the judgment of the District Court in the 
following opinion : 

IN THE UNITED STATES CIRCUIT COURT 

OF APPEALS, NINTH CIRCUIT. 
Billings, Claimant of "W. H. Talbot," Etc., Ap- 
pellant, vs. P>ausback, et als., Appellees. 

Before Gilbert, Ross and Hunt, Circuit Judges. 

Hunt, Circuit Judge. 

The libel was brought by appellees, seamen, 
who alleged that during the voyage referred to 
the allowance of provisions to which each sea- 
men was entitled under Sec. 4612 of the Revised 
Statutes of the U. S. was reduced in certain 
specified ways (specifying the allegations of libel 
as to shortage). The libel further alleges that 
the provisions furnished were bad in quality and 
unfit for use. 

The claimants answered, denying the aver- 
ments pertaining to any reduction of food to 
which libelants were entitled under Sec. 4612 
of the Revised Statutes, and they allege that 
libelants accepted the fare (of) the master pro- 
vided during the voyage, and that none of them 
at any time demanded the scale of provisions 
set forth in Sec. 4612 of the Revised Statutes. 
It is admitted that the potatoes gave out about 
three weeks before the ship arrived at San 
Francisco, but it is averred that canned peas, 
canned beans and canned corn were furnished 
as substitutes; that after the canned peas gave 
out, canned string beans and corn were fur- 
nished; that the canned string beans gave out 
about 7 days before the arrival of the ship, etc. 
It is alleged that fresh bread was served at every 
meal, and that in addition to the various articles 
of food mentioned in the Government schedule 
under Sec. 4612, libelants were furnished with 
(other articles specified). Claimants deny that 
the biscuit were bad or had weevils or maggots, 
or that the flour used in the bread was sour 
or bad, and admit that no substitute was pro- 
vided for the bread that was served other than 
the biscuit referred to. 

(Statement that releases signed were pleaded 
as full defense). 

The shipping articles referred to, after settmg 
forth the provisions of Sec. 4612, of the Revised 
Statutes of the United States referring to the 
scale of provisions to be allowed and served out 
to the crew during the voyage, quoted the pro- 
vision in the law that seamen should have the 



option of accepting the fare the master might 
provide, but the right at any time to demand the 
scale provided by law. 

It is alleged that during the voyage each of 
the libelants was supplied with food sufficient 
for all purposes both in quality and quantity, 
and that no demand ever was made of the cap- 
tain of the vessel or any other person for the 
allowance of food set forth in said shipping 
articles or in Sec. 4612 of the Revised Statutes, 
and that each of the libelants accepted the fare 
which the master provided without complaint, ex- 
cept in one or two cases, when one of the 
libelants requested the captain to provide him 
with some canned meat, which request was com- 
plied with. 

The case was heard by the District Court, 
which decided (the time when the different ar- 
ticles gave out). The Court was of the opinion 
that none of the substitutes provided for in the 
statutes was furnished in place of any of these 
provisions, and that there was nothing aboard 
the ship which could have been furnished as sub- 
stitutes. The Court held . . . that flour and 
bread were served as substitutes for biscuits; 
that the bread was of good quality for the first 
half of the voyage, but that during the latter 
part it was very poor, because the flour out of 
which the bread was made had been wet and 
was moldy and lumpy. 

(Agrees with the findings of the District 
Court as to the facts). 

The argument made by the claimant is that a 
lien will not lie against a ship through the filing 
of a libel against her, on the ground that the 
food supply was not in accordance with the 
scale, when the seamen had every opportunity 
to make known their grievances concerning the 
food to the captain, and the right to demand of 
him the Government schedule, and when it ap- 
pears that no demand for the Government sched- 
ule was ever made. Section 4612, as amended 
by the Act of Congress of Dec. 21, 1898 (Vol. 
30, U. S. Stat. L., 762), after providing for a 
regular schedule of provisions and substitutes, 
contains this language: 

". . . The seamen shall have the option of 
accepting the fare the master may provide, but 
the right at any time to demand the foregoing 
scale of provisions. 

"The foregoing scale of provisions shall be in- 
serted in every article of agreement, and shall 
not be reduced by any contract, except as above, 
and a copy of the same shall be posted in a 
conspicuous place in the galley and in the fore- 
castle of each vessel." 

The same section, Rev. St. U. S., Sec. 4612, 
in its general provisions giving the form of 
Articles of Agreement, provides: 

"And it is also agreed that if any member 
of the crew considers himself to be aggrieved by 
any breach of the agreement or otherwise, he 
shall represent the same to the master or other 
officer in charge of the vessel, in a quiet and 
orderly manner, who shall thereupon take such 
steps as the case may require . . ." 

Now the primary right of the seaman is to 
have provisions as called for by the scale. The 
law was plainly enacted for the purpose of as- 
suring to the seaman a kind and quality of food 
well adapted for the preservation of his health, 
and the requirements of a seaman's life. But 



he may choose to accept such fare as the master 
may provide. However, before the seaman can 
exercise an option as between the fare provided 
by the master, and that included within the scale 
of provisions fixed by the statute, he must have 
opportunity of selecting an alternative diet. That 
is to say, the option can be exercised only 
where it can be fairly said the seaman had had 
an opportunity for choice. 

Under the evidence in the record, the libelants 
herein never were ofTered any choice. Nothing 
was ever said to them about such a thing. They 
had no option, nor an opportunity to make ef- 
fective a formal demand for the Government 
schedule. The articles called for in the Gov- 
ernment schedule were not on the ship. The 
master, of course, knew this; hence a formal 
demand would have availed nothing. The sea- 
men did complain at different times, telling the 
master that the food was not fit to eat, and 
that there was not enough food. One of the 
witnesses testified that the captain knew he 
picked weevils out of the pudding which was 
before them. They told him that there was not 
enough sugar, that the meat was not good, and 
that they wanted the sugar weighed if they could 
not get "full and plenty." The master knew of 
the justice of these complaints, and while when 
made they were not accompanied with formal 
demand for the Government scale, they were so 
plain in expressing disgust at the food the master 
was providing, that by every reasonable intend- 
ment he should have treated them as demands 
for the regular scale. Under the circumstances, 
it would be very unjust to hold that the sea- 
men, by eating such as they could of the food 
provided by the master, exercised the option to 
accept it. The real situation simply required 
libelants to accept what was provided by the 
master or to go without food. 

The suggestion that if a "demand" for the 
Government schedule had been made, the master 
might have gone to a port for provisions, and so 
made it possible to comply with the demand, is 
not very forceful in this instance, for we may 
judicially know that a sailing ship on the last 
part of a voyage from Newcastle, Australia, to 
San Francisco, could not well go to port without 
sailing great distances, thus consuming weeks of 
time. But, however that may be, inasmuch as no 
option was ever exercised, and as the master 
knew that the men were dissatisfied with the 
food, it was his duty to relieve the situation or 
stand the legal consequences. The Mary C. Hale 
case, 132 h'ed., 800; Schr. H. E. Thompson vs. 
Martin, 16 Appeal Cases, D. C, 222. 

(The decision is against the contention that 
the releases constitute defenses against claims 
of this nature. The Court adds): In providing 
that such compensation shall be recoverable as 
wages, the statute has provided a convenient and 
inexpensive manner, by which a seaman may 
avail himself of the benefits of the law. No 
bond is required of a seaman who sues for his 
wages in an admiralty court, although generally 
a bond for costs is required before a libel can 
be filed in such court. It is thus apparent that 
the purjjose of the statute was to enable the 
seaman to recover compensation for short allow- 
a»'.ces or bad provisions, by just such a simple 
process as he employs to recover for services 
(Continued on Page 7.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



GREETING TO BRITISH SEAMEN. 



Walter Alacartlmr, Fraternal Delesjale 
from the International Seamen's Union of 
America to the Annual General Meeting 
of the National Sailors' and Firemen's 
Union of Great Britain and Ireland, held 
at London, Eng., September 23-26, ad- 
dressed that gathering at its opening ses- 
sion. Comrade Macarthur spoke in part 
as follows : 
To the Annual General IMeeting, National 

Sailors' and Firemen's Union of Great 

Britain and Ireland: 

Mr. President and Delegates — I thank 
you for the kindness with which you have 
received me, and extend to you the hearty 
fraternal greetings of- the seamen of the 
United States, with best wishes for the 
success of your work. 

My visit is the second formal exchange 
of greetings between the seamen of the 
United Kingdom and the United States. 
That ceremony, which, let us hope, will 
grow in significance and fruitfulness as 
time passes, was established by the visit 
of your representative. Comrade Thomas 
Chambers, to the convention of the Inter- 
national Seamen's Union of America, held 
at Baltimore, December 4-16, 1911. 

I can not forbear to express, on behalf 
of myself and the American seamen, the 
high esteem in which we hold the services 
and character of Comrade Chambers. His 
presence at our convention was valuable 
not only as an expression of the good will 
of the British seamen, but also as an ex- 
ample of personal conduct at once helpful 
and inspiring. 

Permit me to recall the fact that al- 
though the exchange of fraternal greet- 
ings through the medium of delegates 
commissioned for that purpose is of recent 
origin, the object thus sought to be at- 
tained, has long been a prominent consid- 
eration in the minds of the seamen of the 
United Kingdom and the United States. 

Probably it is natural that that object 
should first be sought by the seamen of 
Great Britain and Ireland. At any rate, to 
them belongs the honor of first giving 
practical expression to the desire for closer 
relations between the seamen of the two 
countries. 

More than twenty years ago the seamen's 
unions in the United States were invited 
by the National Sailors' and Firemen's 
Union, through the then and present Gen- 
eral President, Joseph Havelock Wilson, 
to send representatives to a conference to 
discuss plans for more effective co-opera- 
tion. The invitation was accepted ; the 
conference took place, and the proceedings, 
whatever else may be said, brought out 
very clearly the position occupied by the 
members of the respective organizations 
upon certain points of fundamental im- 
portance to all concerned. 

During the intervening period the sea- 
men of both countries have waged many 
struggles for the improvement of the craft. 
We have experienced tTie usual fortunes of 
war; we have suffered defeat and we have 
achieved victory. Yet we can truthfully 
say that our defeats have been but tem- 
porary, while our victories have been in 
the main permanent. 

The true course made by the seamen's 
unions in the United Kingdom and the 



United States during the past twenty years 
shows a great advance toward the goal 
for which we are striving — reform of the 
legal and industrial status of the seamen. 
The seamen's condition in this respect is 
still very far from ideal, but it is much 
better than even the most sanguine among 
us dared to hope for a few years ago. 

This change has been wrought by one 
means, and by one means alone, namely, 
by the power of organization. Without 
organization the seaman is the most help- 
less of men ; with organization he is among 
the strongest. The seamen by the aid of 
their unions have accomplished greater re- 
forms, and that against greater opposition, 
than have any other class of labor. 

The seamen of the United States have 
progressed by virtue of adherence to con- 
viction upon certain all-important points. 
The law under which they lived, espe- 
cially in its bearings upon their personal 
movements, was a relic of barbarism, jus- 
tifiable, it may be, in the period of its 
origin, but long since outgrown, and ab- 
solutely fatal to all hope of independence 
and self-help. 

Only a few years ago the highest court 
in the land, in a decision upholding the 
law of imprisonment for desertion, de- 
clared that the Thirteenth Amendment to 
the Constitution of the United States, 
which gave legal effect to the victory of 
the Union forces in the Civil War, ap- 
plied only to the Negro, the Chinese 
coolie, and the Mexican peon and was not 
intended to alter the condition of the sea- 
men, who had always been regarded as a 
"peculiar class." 

Thus the Fugitive Slave law, which had 
been modeled upon the maritime law, was 
abolished, but its pattern remained. The 
seaman remained to all intents and pur- 
poses a slave. When he ran away — that 
is, deserted — he became a fugitive. He 
was hunted down, and when caught was 
returned to his ship in irons. At the end 
of his period of servitude he was com- 
pelled to pay the cost of his own capture! 

The seamen learned by experience that 
progress was impossible under such con- 
ditions. Both as a matter of necessity to 
material improvement and as a matter of 
moral right, it was determined that the 
laws should be altered so as to give the 
seaman that measure of personal liberty — 
liberty to dispose of his own person — 
which is his right as a human being and 
which is absolutely essential to real and 
permanent progress. 

As you know, this reform in the mari- 
time law of the United States has already 
been accomplished to a great extent. The 
American seaman is now as free to leave 
his employment in any port of the United 
States or near-by foreign country, as any 
other man in these countries. However, 
the seaman who leaves his vessel before 
the expiration of his agreement still re- 
mains subject to forfeiture of wages due 
and clothing left on board. 

The penalty for desertion in foreign 
ports has been reduced from three months 
to one month's imprisonment. One of the 
features of the Seamen's bill, now pend- 
ing in Congress, provides for the entire 
abolition of imprisonment for desertion in 
foreign ports. There is no doubt that this 
provision will shortly be enacted into law. 
Then, for the first time, the American sea- 



man will be able to ])roclaim himself a 
freeman. 

I may add that the same measure con- 
tains a clause for the abrogation of that 
provision of the treaties with other mari- 
time nations under which the United States 
is obligated to act as the slave-hunter for 
other countries. 

Should the bill be passed, as we hope 
and believe it will be, the seamen of all 
nations will be freemen while in the waters 
of the United States. Let me express the 
hope that the seamen of other countries 
will not long remain slaves in the waters 
of their own ports. 

Liberty brings with it responsibilities 
and dangers. It is liable to be abused. 
However, we must learn to discharge these 
responsibilities and avoid these dangers. 
We must have confidence in ourselves. If 
we would be treated as full-grown men, 
rather than as "minors" and "wards," we 
must prove ourselves men. It is to be 
noted that the number of "desertions" and 
"failures to join" among American seamen 
has materially diminished since the pas- 
sage of the Act fl895) abolishing impris- 
onment for desertion in the American 
coastwise trade. 

To us it seems quite clear that there 
can be no hope of permanent progress un- 
der a system of law based upon the prin- 
ciple of the shipowner's property right in 
the person of the seaman. The evils of 
such a system may be palliated, they may 
even disappear for a time; but so long as 
the system itself remains the seaman's 
hope of progress will be liable to disap- 
])ointment even when it is brightest, and 
lo destruction even when its consumma- 
tion seems assured. We must be foot- 
loose at the start if we would win in the 
end. 

Second only in importance to the matter 
of personal liberty, is that of the right of 
the seaman to receive his wages in full. 
To this end we have worked for the aboli- 
tion of allotment to "original creditor" 
(that is, the crimp). This we have ac- 
complished in the coastwise trade, at the 
same time reducing and limiting the 
amount of allotment which may be paid 
by seamen engaging in foreign-going ves- 
sels. The Seamen's bill, already referred 
to, provides for the entire abolition of al- 
lotment, except to parents or other depend- 
ent relatives. The enactment of this pro- 
vision will protect the seamen against the 
evils of the crimping system. Experience 
under the law as already enacted shows 
that when the crimp is denied the power 
to lay his hands upon the seaman's earn- 
ings, he goes out of the crimping business. 
Exemption of the seaman's clothing from 
attachment for debt is, of course, a corol- 
lary of the abolition of allotment. 

In the matter of our relations with other 
crafts, we have found it necessary to in- 
sist upon the right of the seaman who is 
engaged as a member of a ship's crew to 
perform any and all work "inside the 
rail," including loading and discharging 
cargo. The exercise, or otherwise, of this 
right is determined by our members in 
the respective districts, but the position, 
or principle, is everywhere maintained that 
that right inheres in the seaman's calling 
and may be exercised wherever and when- 
ever in the judgment of the seamen them- 
(Contimied on Page 7.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



"Industrial Unionism." 

That the International Cigarmakers' Un- 
ion can not be swayed by illusory pronun- 
ciamentos or induced to accept abstract 
theories in the conduct of its affairs was 
evidenced by the action of the convention 
in dealing with a resolution committing the 
organization to so-called "industrial union- 
ism." The champions of industrial union- 
ism prescribe no boundary lines, but use 
the euphonious term with abandon. The 
cigarmakers in dealing with this "ism" took 
the only practical position possible, declar- 
ing in effect that the process of amalgama- 
tion must come in the orderly manner of 
evolution, allowing the unions of workmen 
the greatest freedom possible in reaching a 
state of solidarity. The declarations of the 
convention are emphatic, and were unani- 
mously adopted. They are as follows : 

"The Cigarmakers' International Union of 
America declares that the American Trade 
Union Movement is one of constant growth, 
development, and expansion. 

"The American Federation of Labor since 
its inception has been the most practical 
and beneficial general organization of the 
wage workers of the continent. It has 
taken cognizance of the constant change 
ami transition in industry, and by every 
means within its power sought to influence 
and persuade, not only the organization of 
the unorganized workers, but the unity, 
solidarity, and fraternity of the organized 
workers, and stimulated further, by every 
means within its power, the necessity for 
closer co-operation, federation, and amal- 
gamation of existing trades unions, to the 
end that each may be helpful to all. 

"The American Federation of Labor 
realizes that a chain is no stronger than its 
weakest link, that the grand army of or- 
ganized labor cannot advance nuich further 
than its most backward column. It realizes 
the fact that the labor organizations are 
made up of human beings who are not cast 
in plastic molds or can be placed in rigid 
forms. It therefore must concede the 
largest amount of authority to be vested in 
the affiliated unions and their members, 
consistent with the general progress and 
the welfare of the entire wage working 
masses. 

"The American Federation of Labor has 
organized central bodies in hundreds of 
cities, and State federations in nearly all 
the States in America. It has instituted 
large numbers of international unions and 
numberless local unions. It has developed 
the system of Industrial Departments in 
which the organized workers of the differ- 
ent crafts, trades, and callings are fed- 
erated and which co-operate for the com- 
mon protection and advancement of the in- 
terest of all. 

"The American Federation of Labor 
realizes that there is still much to do, but 
it repudiates the insinuation which is im- 
plied by the term 'Industrial Unionism' as 
it is employed in antagonism to 'Trade 
Unionism.' The advocates of so-called 'In- 
dustrial Unionism' imply in their slogan 
that the trade unions are rigid and do not 
advance, develop, or expand, whereas the 
whole history of the trade union move- 
ment in the past thirty years has demon- 



strated beyond successful contradiction that 
there is not a day which passes in the 
trade union movement in America but 
which witnesses the highest and loftiest 
spirit of sacrifice in order to co-operate 
with our fellow workers for their interest 
and common uplift. 

"The stigma which advocates of so-called 
'Industrial Unionism' would attach to 
'Trade Unionism' is of a par with the 
stigma which the enemies of organized la- 
bor apply to the union shop when they 
designate it as the 'closed shop.' 

"In line with the historic, intelligent, and 
comprehensive attitude which the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor has pursued since 
its inception, and which the Cigarmakers' 
International Union has for itself and its 
delegates to the conventions of the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor have advocated 
and pursued. 

"The delegates to the forthcoming con- 
ventions of the A. F. of L. be and they 
are hereby instructed to continue to do all 
in their power to have the work of more 
thoroughly organizing the unorganized 
workers pursued to its fullest extent ; to 
urge upon the organized workers a more 
thorough co-operation ; to advocate amal- 
gamation of organizations of kindred trades 
and callings to a more thorough federation 
of all organized labor, to the end that 
economic, political, moral, and social jus- 
lice shall come to the toilers, the wealth 
I)roducers of America." 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD, 



Organizer Shot by Thugs. 

The lengths to which antagonistic em- 
ployers will go in resisting the organiza- 
tion of their men is depicted in a situa- 
tion now in effect in the vicinity of Spring- 
field, Mass. Organizer Charles A. Miles 
has been endeavoring to interest the em- 
ployes of the various mills throughout this 
district, and has been successful to a con- 
siderable extent. The Hartford Carpet 
Company is bending every effort to prevent 
the organization of its employes. It is re- 
ported that spies have been installed in 
various portions of the factory, and private 
detectives employed on the outside. Much 
difficulty has been experienced in obtain- 
ing a meeting hall in which to hold the 
gatherings of the employes of this com- 
pany, and the police apparently are work- 
ing with the officials of the factory men- 
tioned. At an open air meeting, recently 
held, the police attempted to prevent Or- 
ganizer Miles from speaking, and there is 
no doubt that agents of the company did 
their best to create a disturbance with a 
view of discrediting the movement. Threat- 
ening letters have been sent to those pro- 
moting organization, these letters bearing 
the marks of red paint, skull and cross- 
bones. The writer professes to be an 
Italian, but it is such an obvious fake as to 
leave no doubt but that these letters have 
been directed by agents of the company. 
At Thompsonvillc recently Organizer Miles 
was threatened with serious harm. While 
proceeding to a street car quite a crowd 
composed of a mixed element, together 
with many overseers for the company, fol- 
lowed Miles and threatened to throw him 
(Continued on Page 11.) 



International Seamen's Union of America, 570 
West Lake St., Chicago, III. 

Atlantic District. 

Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union, 51 South St.. 
New York, N. Y. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
Atlantic, 42 South St., New York. 

Inland Seamen's Union, Whitehall, New York. 

Harbor Boatmen's Union, 214 West St., New 
York, N. Y. 

Lake District. 

Lake Seamen's Union, 570 West Lake St., 
Chicago, 111. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Great Lakes, 71 Main St., BufTalo, N. Y. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Union of Great 
Lakes, 55 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 
Pacific District. 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 44-46 East St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
the Pacific, 91 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of the 

Pacific, 51 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Alaska Fishermen's Union, 93 Steuart St.. San 
rrancisco, Cal. 

Uriited Fishermen of Pacific, Box 42. Seattle 
Wash. ' 

Bay and River Steamboatmen's Union 51 
Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia: 
29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S W 
1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 
Queens Chambers, Wellington, N Z 
Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z 
Carrnigton, Newcastle, N. S. W. 
Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria 
Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 
25 Arcade, Brisbane, Queensland 
Dredge Platypus, Cairns. Queensland. 
Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 
Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland 
Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland 
iatriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Road, London, E, 
Lngland. 

Hull Seamen's and Firemen's Union 1 Rail- 
way St., Hull. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, Dubois- 
straat 12, Antwerp, Belgium. 

GERMANY. 
Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband. Engel- 
ufer 21. Berlin P. O. 16, Germany. 

FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts Maritimes de France, Marseille, 11 Place 
de la Joliette. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Quay Videcog, Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Sjomands Forbund, 15 Rosenberg gar- 
den, Bergen, Norway. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Kobenhavn, Toldbod- 
gade 15, Denmark. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, Kobenhavn, St. An- 
napalads 22, Denmark. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond. Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2. Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 

ITALY. 

Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare. Geneva, Tiazza L. Marzellino 6-2. Italy. 

AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Cesterreichs. Trieste, 
Via Boschetto 5. Austria. 

SPAIN. 
I'cderacion Nacional de Obereros de Mar de 
Buqucs v Puerto, Barcelona Mayor, 44, 2, 1 
(Barceloneta), Spain. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad de Resistencia de Foguistas, Monte- 
video, Calle 25 de Agosto No. 219, Uruguay. 

ARGENTINA. 

Federacion Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



The West Australian Government 
has promised to introduce a bill to 
establish a 44 hours' week in all 
industries. 

Twenty thousand rug-spinners in 
the Lancashire cotton trade, chieHy 
females, have obtained a 10 per cent, 
increase in wages. 

Keir Hardie has declared that the 
British Labor party would not shrink 
even from declaring a revolutionary 
strike to keep the army in Britain 
as a hindrance to war. 

A great general strike will be at- 
tempted in Belgium in November as 
a means of forcing the Government 
there to abolish plural voting and in- 
troduce universal suffrage. 

The Amalgamated Railwaymen's 
Union of Great Britain dispensed 
with clerks who recently protested 
against the rate of wages they were 
being paid. The latter are picketing 
the society's oflices to prevent black- 
legging. The situation is compli- 
cated by the National Union of 
Clerks declaring the picketers them- 
selves to be blacklegs for usurping 
the position of qualified clerks. 

It is computed that one-third of 
the adult workers of Great Britain 
are getting not more than 25s. 
($6.08) a week, rather more than 
half not more than $7.30 a week, 
and one million less than $4.90 a 
week. Food for a family of five 
persons, on the lowest scale, costs 
$3.35 a week and rental $1.22. Cloth- 
ing, coal, cleaning materials, light- 
ing, and household replacements is 
estimated at the minimum of 89 
cents per week. Total expenditure, 
$5.45. 

In Berne, Switzerland, a society of 
women has just been formed to for- 
ward an original scheme on behalf of 
girls and women. The object of the 
society is to prevent girls entering 
factories, cafes and trades which are 
already overcrowded with women 
workers, and where the wages are 
therefore cut down to the lowest 
limit. The Berne Society wants 
girls to learn men's trades, and to 
become bookbinders, carpenters, sign 
painters, chemists, farmers, mas- 
seurs, travelers, etc. 

According to a new law which has 
recently come into force in Holland, 
young persons under 17 are not al- 
lowed to work at the printing trade 
before 6 a. m. or after 7 p. m., 
either in or out of the establishment 
where they are employed — i. e., they 
can not, after having put in an ordi- 
nary day's work, be called upon to 
attend technical classes in the eve- 
ning. Thirteen years is the mini- 
mum age at which any person can 
be employed in the trade, and no 
one under 17 can be engaged unless 
furnished with a permit by the local 
burgomaster. 

A series of conferences has been 
arranged by the British Independent 
Labor party and the Fabian Society 
in support of a demand that the 
whole of the next session shall be 
devoted to the "consideration and 
passing of measures that will perma- 
nently raise the standard ^of life of 
the large masses of the working 
people who are suffering from the 
evils of poverty." Among the de- 
mands made are: A legal mini num 
wage, reduction of the hours of labor, 
complete provision against sickness, 
a national minimum of child nurture, 
prevention of unemployment, healthy 
homes for all, the abolition of the 
poor law. 



Cannon's Clothing Store 

Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

Special Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

Men's Suits Made to Order 
515 FRONT-516 BEACON STS. .... SAN PEDRO 



m. BROWIN 

THE SAN FRANCISCO CLOTHING STORE AND OUTFITTER 

EXCLUSIVE AGENT FOR 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

-*27 p-ROrsT STRE313T SAIN PEDRO 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Angeies Beers 
All goods sold at lowest San Francisco prices. We buy direct from Kentucky 
Distilleries and our California Wineries. Seafaring men Invited to Inspect our stock. 
Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

CLOTHES ! ! ! 

Tailored to SUIT YOU at a reasonable price is what you get 
when you leave your order with 

S. G. SWANSON 

641 SOUTH BEACON STREET 
Next door to the Postoffice San Pedro, California 

Union Label Tailoring and satisfied customers is our best advertisement. 
NOTICE! — Why not you, be one of our pleased patrons. Blue serges and 
the season's late styles in woolens always to be found here. 




him. Loose labels 



UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 

When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
retail stores are counterfeits. 



JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary. 11 Waveriy Place. Room 15. New York, N. Y. 



WILL BE A MOTHER TO YOU 
Fix your clothes, sew the rips, re- 
pair the tears, fasten the buttons, etc. 
We really clean your clothes by our 

French Dry Cleaning Process 

which is entirely different from the 

mere "sponging and pressing" method. 

We Call and Deliver 

The French Dye WorKs 

612 BEACON STREET 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Martin Olsen, height 6 feet, weight 
225 pounds, missing since Christmas, 
is inquired for by Riggers' and 
Stevedores' Union, Steuart and Fol- 
som streets, San Francisco. 

John Moen, born 1878 in Norway, 
height 6 feet, is inquired for by his 
father, John Olson Moen, of Lansing, 
Iowa. 

Ole Jenson Lovig (sometimes writ- 
ten Oluf Jenson Lovig), a native of 
Norway, born at Stavanger, Hogs 
ijords; about 54 years old; height, 5 
feet, 9 inches; weight, about 170 
pounds; light complexion; blue eyes; 
last seen at Vancouver, B. C, in 1905. 
Any one able to give any information 
kindly communicate with his brother, 
Jonas Lovig. No. 2414^4 30th St., 
Tacoma, Wash. 

Charles S. Barker, born near St. 
Peter, Nicollet County, Minn., wishes 
to hear from his father, Charles Wm. 
Barker, who left Brookings County, 
S. D., for Oregon, and was going 
sailing again in 1889, and was last 
heard from in Coos County, Ore. Is 
fond of hunting and trapping; has 
been master; sailed out of New York 
City and Boston. Age about 80; 
height about 6 feet; bald headed, 
eyes gray, hair dark. 



San Pedro News Co. 

Sixth and Beacon Streets, San Pedro, Cal. 

Dealers in 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Agents 

Harbor Steam Laundry 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



The United States Shipping Com- 
missioner at Philadelphia, Pa., re- 
quests the following named seamen to 
communicate with him: Gust Leyrle, 
arrived at Philadelphia, October 2, 
1908, on ship Dirigo; Gustav Mattson 
and Victor Wilson, on schooner 
Charles Davenport, March, 1911. 

George Albert Vaughan, aged 47, 
of Handsworth, Birmingham, Eng- 
land. Was in New York city in 1902; 
worked as steward on New York and 
South American boats. Important. 
Address, Rev. R. C. Cookson, 96 
Monroe street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Herman Bjorckbom Eknas, a na- 
tive of Finland, born 1874, is inquired 
for by his Drother Evert. Address, 
Sailors' Union, San Francisco. 

Alexander Benson, native of St. 
John, N. F., last heard of in Canada, 
now supposed to be on the Pacific 
Coast, is urgently inquired for by his 
mother. Address, Mrs. A. Benson, 
King's Bridge, St. John's, N. F. 

John West, who was on the 
steamer Horatius in June, 1912, is 
in(|uired for by P. Ivers, River Dar- 
ling, via Wenthworth, Australia. 
Please notify Sup't., No. 1 State 
street. New York. 

The United States Shipping Com- 
missioner, at New York, is desirous 
of locating the relatives or heirs of 
James Clark, a native of Maine, born 
1854. The deceased has a balance of 
$41.10 due him. 



San Pedro Letter List. 

Antrosen. Karia Larson, I>aurits 

Anderson, Otto -1738Lar.sen, Einar A. 

Airo, Oscar Larson. Louis -1008 

Andersen, Ben. Latz, K. 

Anderson, J. -1099 Lai-sen, C. 

Anderson, Victor Mlciiel, Bertlieli 

-1630 Moulas, Nick 

Alexandersen, P. Meyer, William 
Andree, E. A. -1410 Malmgren, Eric 

Aspe, T. Machada, Enrique 

Anderson, G. Mikelelt, E. (Reg. 
Anderson, Gust -1534 Letter) 

-Anderson, S. Mark, Frank 

Anderson, Fred Markman, H. 

Anderson, J. G. Mauchada, Henry 

Andersen, Harald McGuire, Owen T. 

Brusbard, Ewald Mattson, J. -13S8 
Bengtsson. C. -1924 Markwardt. Carl 

Beyerle, Rupert Murphy, Ambrose 

Bohnhoft, Harry Matlsen. Hendrik 

Benson, Charlie Mellerup. Jens 

Bredberg. Henry Matsen Hemming A. 

Ban, Martin Nordman, John D. 

Bredesen, John Nilsen. Anders 

Berg, H. Y Nelsen. C. J. 

Bulander, B. B. Nutman, Harry 

Bergman. E. Nielsen, P. W. 

Bloom Frank A. Nordman, Jon 
Bodahl, Hans -1746 Nielsen, Alf -1054 

Boardsen. Ed. Nurken, Herman 

Broders, Hajo Nordstrom. Ben 

Buchtman, F. Nystrom, Ragnar E. 

Conners, Jack Nelson, Nils S. 

Clausen, J. Nelson, Anton 

Carlsson, A. -1220 Nelsson. Emll -552 

Christensen, H. P. Norman. L. 

Carlson, Dick Nielsen, Sivert 

Christophersen, R. Nelson, Nils 

Doyle. William Olson, P. 

Daugul. Alfred Olsen, Nick 

Eristrom, Karl Olsen, Wm. 

Ellis, Jack Olsson, Hans 794 

Edgerton, Jack Olssen, H. -714 

Eichel, Erlck Olsen. Martin 

Elllngsen. Eduard Olsen, O. P. -1141 

Edwards. Walter Owen. Fred 

Erickson, Edward Olsen, George 

Frandsen. L. M. Osterhahn, J. W. 

Fasig, Don Peron, Edmund 

Glencross, Harry Petterson, Viggo 
Guthre, Raymond -1322 

Gusek, B. Peterson, Henry 

Green, Frank Peterson, Olof (Reg. 
Glasse, Gust. Lr.) 

Geiger. Joseph Pede'rsen, Peder 

Gotz. Rudolf Potet, Emile 

Gustafson. J. Peterson, Loul 

GroszewskI, Fritz Peterson, Patrick 

Hjort. Knud Pommer, John 

Hellnius, Oscar Petrich, Theodor 

Hannus, Alex Penningrud, L. 

Halto, Waine Rasmussen, Arthur 

Hoft, Hans Richardson, E. E. 

Hakonsen. John Reuter, Cliarles 

Hansen, Berger Rajala, Victor 

Hendenskog. John Retal. F. O. 

Hart, Philip Risbeck. Gustav 

Holgren, G. J. Rasmussen, Rasmus 
Hendersen, V. -1631Remerd, J. 

Halvorsen. H. -595 Rutter. Fritz 

House, James E. Swensen. C. E. 

ITaggar, F. W. Stammerjohan, Hans 

Ingebretsen. Ingolf Sorensen. J. 

.Tones, Auber B. Selklng. Ben 

Jones. Harry Schafer. Ernest 

Jones, Arthur SIgnard, Walter 

Jersh, Billy Schmld. John -2579 

Johnsen. Gunnar Schmld. F. 

Jen.=en. J. Frank Sassl, Wilhelm 

Jolin.son, Arthur Scott, Ed. 

Johanssen. Fritz Sorensen. Michael 

Johnsen, Walter Sandstrom. Ivar 
Johnssen, C. -2016 Strahle, Chas. 
Jacobsen, John (Reg. Letter) 

Johason. Ole Sides. William 

Jacobsen, Anders Sievers, G. 

.Johansson. A. -1874 Schmld, J. 

.Johnson, Axel J. Swanson, Julius 

Jonassen, C. Sasson. John 

Johnsen. John Smith, Henry 

Johnson, Axel Smith, J. S. 

Johnsen, J. K. -1715 Smith. John V. 
Johnson, O. (Capt. Svanson, Ben 

Starr, Reg. Lrr.) Tammi, Emll 

Irwin, Robert Tomsen, Peder 

Kohlmeister, O. Thorn. Arvid 

Klaessen, Karl A. ToUefsen, R.. 

Karlsen, Jacob Torbjornsen, Andrew 

Kumm, Chas. V. Thorsen, J. 

Kopatz. Oscar Togersen. Anton 

Kern. Max Wilson. Harry 

Kilman. Gunnar Ward, H. 

Karlson, R. TMappa, Kostl 

Kuhne. W. Wahrenberg. Otto 

Kerloau. Alex Ziebel, Albert 
Kosze. Franz (Reg.Zoe, Francois 

I>) Younggren, E. 
Lundmark. Helge PHOTOS AND 

J.arson, Martin -1710 PACKAGES. 

Lewis, George H. Mikelelt, E. 

Larsen, Martin Axelsen, W. 

Jjange, Ingolf de Boy. Geo. 

I^udewipr. Edmond Kees. Jj. 

Leino, Fred Manners. C. 

Lister. W. Schroeder, Ernst 



^^^A^^A^/wv^^^^^^^v^v^/v>^wv>^<^v^^N»v^N^^^ 



YOU NEED NOT BE BROKE 
WHEN IN SAN PEDRO 

I buy and sell new and second- 
hand goods that have any value. 

I also do Gun and Locksmithing, 
Upholstering and Mattress Making. 

N. MANN 

335 BEACON STREET, San Pedro 
Near 4th Street 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Emanuel Nyreen, a native of Abo, 
Finland, was member of crew of 
revenue-cutter Dexter, in 1908. Please 
communicate H. H. Rohrbach, New- 
ton Theological Institute, New Cen- 
ter, Mass. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



After several days of continued effort the sub- 
marine F-1 was finally pulled off the beach at 
Port Watsonville on Oct. 19 and was brought in 
tow of the tug Iroquois to the navy yard at 
Mare Island. There the damaged deep-sea 
fighter will be docked and undergo extensive 
repairs. 

The steamer Multnomah was launched by 
Charles R. McCormick at St. Helens, Ore., on 
October 12. The steamer, the largest sea going 
vessel constructed on the Columbia River, was 
built by the St. Helens Ship Building Company 
and is wholly a St. Helens product. The timber 
for the hull was logged and sawed by the St. 
Helens Lumber Company. 

The barge "Two Brothers," formerly one of 
the fleet of barges owned by the Dunsmuir Co., 
has been sold to a Puget Sound company to 
be used as a floating cannery and will be 
equipped with machinery at Seattle. The "Two 
Brothers" was one of the old Maine built sail- 
ing ships, haviftg been constructed at Farming- 
dale, Me., in 1868. She is a wooden vessel 
of 1,383 tons, with two decks. 

Prospects of a coal famine along the Pacific 
Coast have begun to give shipping interests no 
little concern, particularly time charterers of 
tramp steamers fixed to transport wheat, lumber, 
flour to Europe and the Orient. On account of 
the coal strike at Comox, Nanaimo and Lady- 
smith, B. C, there has been a heavy drain on 
the supply at Seattle, Portland, Tacoma and 
other North Pacific ports, and the situation has 
taken a serious aspect. 

September was an exceedingly good month 
for foreign shipments, from Grays Harbor, ac- 
cording to a statement given out by the United 
States officials, during the month. Fifty-five 
vessels loaded lumber on Grays Harbor, the 
cargoes amounting to 43,317,000 feet, and about 
11,000,000 feet were shipped foreign, while the 
remainder went to California. The month of 
October has so far kept up and even ahead 
of last year's shipping record. 

In addition to the "Ucayali," which has always 
been an oil-burner, the "Urubamba" and "Hual- 
laga" of the Peruvian Steamship Company have 
now been converted for the use of liquid fuel, 
which is fast coming to be the fuel of the West 
Coast. The Pacific Steam Navigation Com- 
pany is studying the project of changing the 
coasting steamers over, as soon as the series 
of tanks along the coast is completed, to ensure 
a' constant supply in the South as well as the 
North. 

The International Steel Corporation, which 
recently filed papers at Tacoma with a capitali- 
zation of $20,000,000, proposes to build a steel 
plant on Puget Sound. Ore will be brought 
from Mexico and southern California, and a 
line of German steamers through the Panama 
Canal and touching Mexican ports will provide 
transportation. German capitalists are said to 
be behind the corporation. The project has 
no connection with the Western Steel Corpora- 
tion. 

The steam-schooner J. J. Loggie went ashore 
ofif Point Arguello, Cal., on Oct. 19. It is re- 
ported that no lives were lost, but, that the 
vessel has broken in two and will be a total 
loss. The J. J. Loggie is principally owned by 
parties in Eureka. She is but four years old, 
having 'been built in 1908. The vessel is 145 
feet long, 34 feet beam and 12.6 feet deep, and 
of 404 gross tons. Insurance to a considerable 
amount is said to be carried on the steamer, 
which is valued at about $40,000. 

In tow of the steam-schooner St. Helens, the 
schooner Dauntless was brought back to San 
Francisco on October IS in a waterlogged con- 
dition. The St. Helens and the Dauntless were 
in collision during a dense fog at 7:30 o'clock 
Sunday evening. The St. Helens left San Fran- 
cisco on Sunday for Portland, and the schooner 
was bound out from Fort Bragg for Honolulu 
lumber laden. The sailing craft has been par- 
ticularly unfortunate, as she was only recently 
in collision with the steamer Roanoke ofif the 
south coast. 

Acting under information received from spe- 
cial agents in the Orient that there were a 
number of smuggled Chinese coolies on hoard 
the Pacific Mailer Siberia, which arrived at San 
Francisco during the past week, immigration 
sleuths made a close search of the vessel. The 
raid was under the personal direction of General 
Backus, Commissioner of Immigration, who was 
assisted by twenty inspectors. In order to de- 
tect any possible substitution, the inspectors 
who examined the Chinese crew and the Asiatic 
passengers were unusually stringent in their 
work. The search failed to reveal _ anything 
to substantiate the "advance information." 

Guillcrmo Gonzales, engineer in the Mexican 
lighthouse service, is visiting San Francisco 
for the purpose of examining the system of 
compressed-air fog signals in use in this de- 
partment, with the view of introducing a similar 
system on the Pacific Coast of the Mexican re- 
public. He was taken to the Farallones by 
Cantain H. W. Rhodes, superintendent of the 
United States Lighthouse Service on this Coast, 
to inspect the system of compressed-air horns 



worked by kerosene internal combustion engines. 
The visitor expressed himself as highly pleased 
with the efficiency of the service in and around 
the Bay of San Francisco, both as to fog 
signals and automatic flashing lighthouses. 

Telegraphic advices from Dutch harbor re- 
port that the little power schooner Elvira, Cap- 
tain F. Schroeder, has made the biggest whale 
catch of the season in the far north. The 
schooner took twelve mammals, and, in ad- 
dition to the prosperous returns from this 
industry, the outfitters will reap a good harvest 
from their trading operations in skins and furs. 

United States Local Inspectors James Guthrie 
and Joseph P. Dolan on October 18 suspended 
for ten days the license of Captain A. M. 
Panzer, master of the steamer South Coast, for 
negligence on the occasion of the collision be- 
tween his vessel and the steamer Marshfield on 
August 2L "We are satisfied," say the in- 
spectors, "that had you kept your course and 
speed the collision would have been avoided." 
J. H. Ahlin, master of the Marshfield, was 
exonerated. 

Harry Olson, sailor, distributer of the typhoid 
germs and thus considered to be one of the 
most dangerous and unique characters on the 
Coast, has been placed on probation for six 
months by the State Board of Health and the 
United States Marine Hospital Service. At the 
end of that time he must prove that he is free 
of typhoid or he will again be incarcerated. 
Olson was discovered last February to have 
been the direct cause of infecting twenty-eight 
cases of typhoid fever, four of which proved 
fatal. Since that time he has been confined 
in the Marine Hospital at San Francisco. A 
peculiar phase of Olson's case is that while his 
system is said to be a veritable hotbed for 
typhoid germs, they do not seem to afifect him 
in the least. He is what is known among 
medical men as a "carrier." 

By the plucky work of the crew of the 
steamer Brooklyn, the steam schooner Gualala, 
which was adrift off the Coast bottom up and 
with the hull just showing above the waves, 
was brought into San Francisco Bay on October 
17. Captain Svenson nearly ran down the dere- 
lict in the thick fog thirty-five miles northwest 
of Point Reyes and finally picked it up after 
three attempts to find it. As he was coming 
along for San Francisco in extremely thick 
weather he ran across the Gualala less than 
fifty feet ofif his beam. He turned back to 
find the wreck, picked it up and lost it three 
times before he finally lay alongside and got a 
line fast. As it came so near causing him 
serious damage he thought he would try to 
bring it to San Francisco and came along at a 
slow rate until ofif the Heads. There the tug 
Ida W. met him, having been sent out by his 
owners to help bring in the waterlogged tow. 

Two seamen were seriously injured and 
several others had a narrow escape from being 
mangled or drowned when the Union Oil Com- 
pany's big tanker Argyll rammed the steam 
schooner Gualala at 3:05 p. m,, on October 15, 
twenty-five miles south of Point Arena, during 
a dense fog. The crew of the Gualala, which 
capsized after the prow of the oil tanker had 
cleft through her port bow, was brought into 
port by the Argyll, which stood by and took the 
mariners off the wreck after the collision. It 
is reported that within ten minutes after the 
impact the steam schooner rolled over on her 
port side until she was almost turtle, and the 
fact that she was laden with ties and bark was 
the only thing that saved her from plunging 
to the bottom immediately. In this short space 
of time the eighteen members of , the crew 
were safely transferred to the Argyll, which 
then remained by the derelict until the steam 
schooner Daisy Mitchell hove in sight. 

Dr. Barton W. Evermann, chief of the Alaska 
Fisheries Service of the United States Bureau 
of Fisheries, has begun a hearing at Seattle, 
Wash., to determine the advisability of setting 
apart certain waters in Alaska as preserves for 
salmon spawning and the limiting or prohibition 
of all commercial fishing in those waters. The 
.Secretary of Commerce and Labor is authorized 
by act of Congress to set aside any Alaska 
rivers or lakes at his discretion, with the 
proviso that before issuing an order he shall 
give a public hearing to persons interested. At 
(his hearing it is proposed to i)rohibit com- 
mercial fishing in all streams tributary to Cook 
inlet; in the Eyak River, near Prince William 
Soimd, and in Humnback Creek, on Cleveland 
peninsula. Representatives of the three packing 
associations operating in Alaska favor the res- 
ervations. Dr. Evermann will also confer with 
fur dealers who buy Alaska pelts relative to 
conservation of the fur-bearing animals. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America. 

Afflliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF L.ABOR 
and 
INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' FED- 
ERATION. 



THOS. A. HANSON, 
570 West Lake St., Chicago. 111. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK. N. Y., 51 South St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON. Mass.. 1%A Lewis St 
PORTLAND. Me.. 377A Fore St 
PHILADELPHIA. Pa., 206 Moravian St 
BALTIMORE. Md.. 802-804 South Broadway 
NORFOLK. Va., 221 Water St 
MOBILE. Ala.. 4 Conti St 
NEW ORLEANS. La., 535 St. Ann St 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an offi- 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims 
of all seafarers careful attention. 324 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg., Third Floor, California St., near 
Montgomery. Telephone, Kearny 394; Home, 
C 3832. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF' THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 4 South St. Telephone 1879 

Broad. Night Call 8374 Spring. 
New York Branch, 400 West St. Telephone 5153 
Chelsea. 

Branches: 
BOSTON. Mass.. 2.58 Commercial St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 63 St. Ann St. 
BALTIMORE, Md.. 802-804 South Broadway 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 ContI St. 
PHILADELPHIA. Pa.. 206 Moravian St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION OF NEW YORK 
AND VICINITY. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y.. 214 West St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKES DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO. 111.. 570 West Lake St. 

Branches: 
BUFFALO. N. Y.. 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR. O., 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND. O.. 1401 W. 9th St. 
MILWAUKEE. Wis.. 133 Clinton St. 
TOLEDO. O.. 54 Main St. 
N. TONAWANDA, N. Y.. 152 Main St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR. O.. 992 Day St 
ERIE. Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
DETROIT. Mich.. 7 Woodbridge St.. East 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich.. 108 Fifth Ave. 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y.. 70 Isabella St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, III.. 9142 Mackinaw Ave 
PORT HURON. Mich., 517 Water St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO. N. Y.. 71 Main St. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND. O., 1185 W. Eleventh St. 
CHICAGO, 111., 445 La Salle Ave. 
DETROIT, Mich.. 7 Woodbridge St.. East. 
MILWAUKEE. Wis.. 151 Reed St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis.. 1814 Fourth St. 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y.. 70 Isabella St. 
BAY CITY. Mich., 108 Fifth Avfi. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y.. 55 Main St.. Tel. Seneca 2295. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O., 1401 West Ninth St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 151 Reed St. 
CHICAGO, 111., 314 N. Clark St. 
ASHTABULA, O., 74 Bridge St. 
TOLEDO, O., 54 Main St. 
DETROIT. Mich., 7 East Woodbridge St 
PT. HURON. Mich.. 517 Water St 
CONNEAUT. O.. 922 Day St. 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y.. 70 I.sabella St. 
N. TONAWANDA, N. Y.. 152 Main St 
SUPERIOR. Wis., 1721 N. Third St 
BAY CITY, Mich.. 108 Fifth Ave. 
BRIE. Pa.. 107 E. Third St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO. 111.. 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 

PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 44-46 East St. 
Branches: 

VICTORIA, B. C. Old Court Rooms, Bastion 
Square. 

VANCOUVER. B. C. Labor Temple, Cor. Homer 
and Dunsmuir. P. O. Box 1365. 

TACOMA. Wash.. 2218 North 30th St. 

SEATTLE. Wa.sh., 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 65. 

PORT TOWTMSEND. Wash., 114 Quincy St.. P. O. 
Box 48. 

ABERDEEN. Wash.. P. O. Box 6. 

PORTLAND. Ore. 51 Union Ave.. Box 2100. 

EUREKA, Cal., 227 First St., P. O. Box 64. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal.. P. O. Box 67. 

HONOLULU, II. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts., 
P. O. Box 314. 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBUSHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



WALTER MACARTHUR Editor 

PAl'L SCHARRENBERG Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six months - - $1.00 
Advertising Rates on Application. 

Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To insure a prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the S.nn Francisco Postofiice as second- 
class matter. 



Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
44-46 East Street. San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
publislied In the JOURNAI-, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The .TOURNAI., Is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23. 1912. 



SAILORS' RECEIVE TROPHY. 



The Sailors' Union of the Pacific, in its 
reg-ular mectins): at Headquarters, on last 
Monday, had two welcome visitors whose 
object was to formally present to the 
L^nion the special prize awarded to the 
organization for the splendid showing made 
in the late Labor Day parade with the 
"Float" which represented a full-rigged 
ship, perfect in every detail. 

The men delegated by the General Labor 
Day Committee to present the trophy were 
John I. Nolan, Secretary of the San Fran- 
cisco Labor Council and James B. Bowen, 
Vice President of the State Building Trades 
Council of California. Brother Nolan, who 
was introduced by Chairman Andersen as 
the next Congressman from the Fifth Dis- 
trict, made a neat presentation speech in 
which he paid several graceful compliments 
to the Sailors' Union. In the meantime 
Brother Bowen had unwrapped the beauti- 
ful silver loving cup, which was placed 
upon the Chairman's stand while the mem- 
bers present showed their appreciation of 
the jinnor conferred upon them by enthus- 
iastic applause. 

The special prize, which is as fine a 
specimen of the silversmith's art as could 
be produced, bears the following engraving: 

SPECIAL PRIZE 

for 

M.\GXIFICENT APPEARING FLOAT 

in 

LABOR DAY PARADE, 1912 

Awarded to 

S.-MLORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Donated by 

^rORGEN JEWERLY COMPANY 

Brother Bowen then briefly addressed 
the meeting, stating, among other nice 
things, that while this was his first appear- 
ance in a Sailors' Union meeting he had 
been familiar with the good work and char- 
acter of llio iirganization for many years. 
Comrade .Vndersen responded in a few 
well chosen words and then the visitors 



(le])artc(l, leaving the coveted prize in the 
meeting. 

This is the second trophy to grace the 
I k'a(l(|uarters of the Sailors' Union of the 
I'acific and both were carried home by 
liie men of the sea in keen competition 
with hundreds of organizations whose 
membership is composed of land-lubbers ex- 
clusively. 

Someone may .say that this is too much 
like blowing our own horn — ! Well, per- 
haps it is, but why not? Have we not 
every reason to do so? 

Here's to the men who worked so loyally 
and faithfully to enable us to capture that 
beautiful cup which will be admired by 
present and future generations of seamen 
of the Pacific Coast. 



LEARN SWIMMING! 



The most remarkable argument yet offered 
by a representative of shipowners against a 
sufiicient complement of lifeboats on steam- 
ers plying within five miles of the shore, is 
that made by Mr. N. L. Cullin, who is quoted 
in the daily press as follows : 

Ninety per cent, of the people can swim or 
float near shore until they reach land or are 
rescued. Water in and around New York doesn't 
get much colder one month after September 15 
than on that date. . Then why should 

the owners be compelled to burden their boats 
after September IS with so many more life- 
craft? It is a hardship. 

We will not at this time dispute the point 
made by Mr. Cullin as to why owners should 
be compelled to do anything which imposes 
a hardship upon them. However, issue is 
hereby taken with his assertion that "ninety 
per cent, of the people can swim or float." 
I'n fortunately, that statement is far from the 
truth. In any ordinary gathering in this 
country the average number of swimmers is 
much smaller than that of those who are 
unable to keep themselves afloat through 
their own efforts. Swimming ought to be a 
part of the required training of every child, 
but it is not regarded of sufiicient importance 
in many cities to provide free or nearly free 
facilities for acquiring that accomplishment. 
San Francisco, for an instance, is almost sur- 
rounded by water, yet there is not one free 
public swimming place on the peninsula. 

In all the large and most of the small 
cities of Germany, public baths have been in 
existence for many years. In that country 
a shower or a dip in a swimming tank may 
be enjoyed by any one for a merely nominal 
charge. 

Denmark is another country in which the 
interest in the children is not confined to the 
school system, but the idea of the free bath 
and gymnasium has been carried out to per- 
fection. On the sound near Copenhagen — 
easily reached by the car — are many baths 
practically free. Vacant land which slopes to 
the sea has been turned over to the boys, 
where they run and tumble in the fresh air 
and sunshine. A dip in the sea completes 
their hour of recreation. 

In many Eastern cities of this country 
splendid bathing facilities have been provided. 
Public school children in Chicago, for exam- 
ple, are oflFered free instruction in swimming 
at the tanks located in the four Y. M. C. A. 
buildings in different i)arts of the city. Fif- 
teen hundred children can be instructed at 
one time, and it is estimated that in three 
or four lessons they will be able to swim the 
width of the tanks, or about 25 feet. 

However, San Francisco, sometimes called 
the metropolis of the Pacific, has in this re- 



spect (lone absolutely nothing for her poor 
children, although everybody knows that all 
inhabitants of this globe, except perhaps the 
desert dwellers, are likely to have practical 
and urgent need of the art some time in life. 
By all means, let us give every one an op- 
portunity to learn swimming. Those philan- 
thropic shipowners of San Francisco who are 
so earnestly opposed to the Seamen's bill and 
similar legislation which will provide suffi- 
cient boats and competent seamen to save 
life on the waters when necessary, will i)rob- 
ably be willing to head a subscription list for 
public swimming tanks. Still, that may be 
considered another hardship ! 



-A. New York exchange, in a recent issue, 
discus.sed the possibility of training monkeys 
to do a good deal of the mechanical work 
on shipboard and states that there has never 
developed any reason why it should not be 
done. Our contemporary also vouches for 
the fact that a dog has often proved a val- 
uable member of a watch on deck, especially 
in thick weather, when his keen sense of 
smell and hearing will, detect the proximity 
of another vessel or boat invisible to man. 
Continuing, the New York editor says: 

There is no telling what other animals might 
develop in similar value if studied. It is in- 
teresting, therefore, to note that at Galveston re- 
cently visitors to the steamship Louisiana, from 
I.iverjjool, saw a big African monkey, the ship's 
mascot, washing sailors' clothes. The seamen 
say that they have been training the monkey 
for si.\ months, and it not only proves a good 
washer but is expert in polishing brass and 
scrubbing decks. 

All of which is respectfully called to the 
attention of Mr. R. P. Schwerin and other 
lovers of cheap .Asiatic labor who may find 
it to their (financial) advantage to substitute 
monkeys for Chinks and Japs. 



The management of the San Francisco 
Bulletin, always enterprising and progres- 
sive, has arranged to send its Labor Editor, 
Frederick W. Ely, to Rochester, N. Y., 
next month to report the proceedings of 
the American Federation of Labor conven- 
tion. Each day Mr. Ely will tell of the 
proceedings of the great labor convention 
through the columns of The Bulletin, pay- 
ing particular attention to matters of 
special importance to trade-unionists of 
California. At the close of the conven- 
tion Mr. Ely will write a general review 
of the entire convention. Mr. Ely's wide 
experience and established reputation as a 
Labor reporter are a sufficient guaranty 
that his stories will be accurate and un- 
biased. The Bulletin is to be congratu- 
lated for this splendid service to its trade- 
unionist subscribers. 



One of President Taft's pets, I'nited States 
District Judge Cushman, at Seattle, Wash., 
recently made permanent a temporary injunc- 
tion restraining residents of Renton, a coal 
mining town near Seattle, from interfering 
with certain non-union men. \\'ith reference 
t(i the use of the term "scab" his Honor 
made the following comment : 

Complaint is made that the strikebreakers have 
lieen called "scabs." The name "scab" is cal- 
culated to provoke assault, and this Court can 
not countenance any attempt to cause violence. 

It is difficult to understand why it should 
be made a crime to call a strikebreaker by 
another perfectly proper name as defined in 
the dictionary. It would certainly be just as 
logical to i)unish a person for calling a pawn- 
broker a "shylock," or for calling a highway- 
man a "robber." 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



GREETING TO BRITISH SEAMEN. 

(Continiicd from Page 2.) 



selves such a course is necessary to insure 
reasonable continuity of employment. 

We do not assert the right to work 
cargo, or to perform any other particular 
kind of work "inside the rail," merely for 
the sake of the work itself, least of all for 
the purpose of depriving any other class 
of workers of the opportunity to earn a 
livelihood. We do, however, insist upon 
the exercise of that right where such is 
the only alternative of walking ashore at 
the end of each passage. 

As to our obligation as trade-unionists 
to assist our fellow-workmen, as in the 
case of a strike, we hold to the position 
that we ought to be consulted before a 
strike is declared, and that, in any event, 
we must determine for ourselves what our 
course shall be. This we believe to be 
the best rule of action among any class 
of trade-unions associated with each other. 
In the case of the seamen's unions this 
rule is imperative. To surrender to any 
delegated body the right to say whether 
or not we shall go on strike, or whether 
or not we shall be assessed, would be to 
place our unions and our funds at the 
disposition of a majority composed of land- 
workers, who, being unfamiliar with the 
conditions of our calling, are unable to 
weigh the circumstances which seamen 
must consider if they would act wisely in 
their own and other people's behalf. 

We hold ourselves ready to render any 
assistance within our power to the work- 
ers in every calling. But such assistance 
must be rendered voluntarily, as a free ex- 
pression of our confidence in the cause at 
issue; it can not be forced from us as a 
tribute to any power higher than ourselves. 

Such, in brief, are the views of the In- 
ternational Seamen's Union of America 
upon some of the matters most intimately 
afifecting its work. The success thus far 
achieved by that organization is due chiefly 
to the carrying into efifect of these views 
in the everyday practice of the Union. 

Great as our progress has been, we en- 
tertain the strongest hope of still greater 
advancement for the maritime calling. 

We hope that the work of organizing 
the members of our craft will prosper un- 
til every man who goes to sea, whether 
on deck, in the fire-room, or m the galley 
and cabin, shall be brought within the 
fold of unionism. 

We hope that the seamen's unions 
throughout the world will unite in what- 
ever form may be deemed most effective 
for the promotion of our common inter- 
ests and for the purpose of giving expres- 
sion to that sentiment of brotherhood 
which characterizes the men of our craft 
under every flag that flies on the sea. 

We hope that the seamen of the world 
may soon regain their former position of 
honor among men, and thus again be en- 
abled to live the lives of men, to gratify 
every manly instinct, to follow every man- 
ly impulse, to discharge every manly obli- 
gation — to move freely and upon terms of 
equality among their fellows in every other 
walk of life. 

We hope for the Brotherhood of ihe 
Sea, and a Union in Every Port ! 

IIoi)ing thus, and working thus, the sea- 
men of the ITnitcd States greet the sea- 
men of Great Britain and Ireland. May 



your work prosper under firm hands, clear 
heads and the favor of the All-Seeing One ! 

We extend congratulations upon the 
s])lendid victories of the past, coupled with 
the hope that these may shortly be fol- 
lowed by other achievements of equal, if 
not greater advantage to the men of the 
British Mercantile Marine. 

To you, Mr. President, we extend our 
token of appreciation for the great services 
you have rendered the seamen, not only 
in your own country, but also in the 
United States. We trust that your health 
may shortly be fully restored, and that you 
may long be spared to keep up the good 
figlit. 

Delegates and Comrades, on behalf of 
the International Seamen's Union of 
.America, I wish you God-speed in your 
work. 

I thank you. 



AWARD FOR SHORTAGE OF FOOD. 

(Continued from Page 1.) 



pcrfoniicd during the voyage. It follows that 
tlie release under examination being merely for 
wages, was only good for the purpose for which 
it was given, and therefore has no reference 
to additional allowances for failure to furnish 
good and sufficient food. Flanders on Shipping, 
page 70, refers to the Act of July 20, 1790, as 
authorizing recovery for short allowances in the 
same manner as one of the crew recovers "stipu- 
lated wages." The allowance of the compensa- 
tion in addition to wages imports a penalty, re- 
coverable as a wage, yet not in fact a wage. 
Peterson et al. vs. J. F. Cunningham Co., 11 
Fed., 211. 

P.y Sec. 4554 of the Revised Statutes of the U. 
S., a shipping commissioner shall hear and de- 
cide any question whatsoever between a master, 
agent, or owner, and any of his crew, which 
1)oth parties agree in writing to submit to him, 
and every award so made by him shall be bind- 
ing on both parties. Inasmuch as it is not 
contended in this case that there was any agree- 
ment in writing to submit to the commissioner 
any question of compensation in addition to 
wages, or that the question of allowances was 
placed before the commissioner by the release 
given libelants did not relieve the master and 
the owners from liability for claims which they 
may have had und'r Sec. 4568, heretofore re- 
ferred to. 

Affirmed. 



Another recent case in which the seamen 
won their point is as follows: 

IX THF DISTRICT COURT OF THE UNI- 
TED STATES, FOR THE NORTHERN 
DISTRICT OF CALIFORNIA. FIRST 
DIVISION. 

(In Admiralty.") 
Robinson, et al,, vs. The Am. Schr. "Americana." 

No. 15,248. 

This is a lilicl by seven seamen to recover 
compensation on account of the failure to serve 
the amount of provisions to which they were 
entitled under Sec. 4612 R. S., on a voyage of 
the schr. "Americana," from Australia, to the 
p(H-t of San Francisco. The vessel was 128 days 
making the voyage referred to, and the libel 
alleges: That for a period of 121 days, neither 
of the libelants had any flour, or any substitute 
therefor: and that during the whole period of 128 
days, each of the libelants' allowance of pork 
under said section 4612. was reduced more than 
one-third, and during the same period the al- 
lowance of bread to each was reduced more 
than one-third the quantity allowed by said sec- 
tion, and that no substitute was furnished; and 
that during the same period, each of said libel- 
ants' allowance of rice was reduced more than 
one-third, and no substitute was furnished; that 
no molasses was furnished; no salt for 114 days; 
no corn meal, and no sugar for the last 5 days. 

T find that the crew were not served with 
molasses for 128 days. I further find that the 
crew were not furnished during some portion of 
the voyage with the amount of biscuit, salt jmrk, 
rice, and corn meal, to which they were entitled 
under Sec. 4612 of the Revised Statutes, but 
it docs not appear that there was any suffering 
among the crew bv reason of the failure of the 
vessel so to provide. 

My conclusion is, that each of the libelants 
should be awarded the sum of fiftv cents per 
day for 128 days, the allowance to be in full 
compensation for all the matters alleged in the 
libel. The libelants to recover costs. 

October 9, 1912. 

JOHN J. De HAVEN, 

Judge. 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



1 1 eadquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 21, 1912. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7:30 
p. m., Va\. .'\ndersen presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping fair. Shipwreck Benefit was 
ordered paid to members wrecked in the steam- 
schooners Daisy Freeman and Gualala and the 
schooner Dauntless. 

ANDREW FURUSETH, Secretary. 

44-46 East St. Bell Phone Kearny 2228. 
Home Phone J 2228. 



Victoria, B. C, Oct. 13, 1912. 
Shipping poor. 

ARCHIE KING, Agent. 
Old Court Rooms, Bastion Square. 



Vancouver, B, C, Oct. 1.5, 1912. 
Shipping fair. 

JOHN PEARSON, Agent. 
Labor Temple, cor. Homer and Dunsmuir. 
P. O. Bo.x 1365. 



Tacoma Agency, Oct. 14, 1912. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping dull; pros- 
pects uncertain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 14, 1912. 
Shipping dull; prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 

84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Port Townsend Agency, Oct. 14, 1912. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping poor; 
prospects uncertain. 

WALTER MOLLER, Agent. 
229^< Water St. P. O. Box 48. Tel. 141 J. 



.\berdeen Agency, Oct. 14, 1912. 
Shijiiiing good; prospects uncertain. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
P. O. I?ox 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Oct. 14, 1912. 
Shipping poor. 

O. DITTMAR, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2100. 51 Union Ave. Tel. East 
4912. 



Eureka Agency, Oct. 14, 1912. 
No mcclin.L;; no quorum. Shipping medium; 
prospects uncertain. 

JOHN W. ERICKSEN, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 553 R. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct, 14, 1912. 
Shipping dull: prospects uncertain. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
P. O, Box 67. Tel. 137, L. 



Honolulu Agency, Oct. 7, 1912. 
Shipping good; prospects uncertain. 

CHAS. TAUCER, Agent. 
Cor. Oueen and Nuuanu Sts. P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



I leadc|uarters. San Francisco, Cal,, Oct. 17, 1912. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order 
at 7 p. m,, Ed, Andersen in the cliair. Secretary 
reported shipping slow, plenty men ashore. The 
Shipwreck Benefit was ordered paid to two mem- 
bers wrecked on the steam-schooner Gualala. 
The proposition of establishing an agency in 
Portland, Ore., was ordered placed on the ballot 
of election of officers, to be voted upon in the 
same for?n as for officers. 

EUGENE STEIDLE. Secretary. 

42 Market street. 

Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle .\gency, Oct. 9, 1912. 
Xo meeting, Shiiiping slow. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER. Agent. 
P O. Box 1335. 1003 Western Ave. Phone 
Sun Main 2233. 



DIED. 

iM-ank Monsen, No. 2080, a native of Sweden, 
age 39, drowned from the schooner Robert 
Lewis at sea, on September 9, 1912. 

Carl Isak Isacson, No. 140, a native of Imu- 
land. age 32, died at San Pedro, Cal., on ()cto- 
ber 17, 1912. . „ , • 

John Verdonk, No. 72, a native of iUdgnim, 
age 49, drowned at Xushigak, .Alaska, on June 

6. l'^12, 

Peter O. Olscn, No. 581, a native of Norway, 
age 53, died on the ship Star of India, at sea. 
n;i May 7. 1912. 

Robert Rohdc. No. .361, a native ol GcnnrMiy, 
.-ige 30. (lied in \laska, .August 13, 1912, 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



*^^* 



ON THE GREAT LAKES, 



Contributed by the Lake Seamen's Union 



•^^* 



A CHANGE IN HELLFARE. 



The continued agitation of the Seamen's 
Union against the notorious "welfare plan" 
has again stirred the Lake Carriers' Asso- 
ciation to make further changes in its 
rules, in a vain hope of giving the mon- 
strosity some faint color of decency. The 
latest change occurs in Article IV, under 
the heading "Record Discharge Books," 
governing methods to be used in applying 
the blacklist to seamen. Until recently 
the rules in that Article provided that if the 
ship's officer did not see fit to give the sea- 
man a "good" or "fair" character mark in 
the discharge book, the book should be re- 
tained by the officer and the seaman black- 
listed. Now a new mark has been origi- 
nated, to be used when the marks "good" 
or "fair" are not considered descriptive of 
the officer's opinion of the sailor. The 
section amended by the Lake Carriers 
originally was as follows : 

"If this entry be 'good' or 'fair,' the book 
shall be returned direct to the man, but when, in 
the best judgment of the officer with whom the 
book is deposited, such entry cannot justly be 
made, and in every case of desertion or failure 
to serve after engaging, the book shall be re- 
turned by the master to the secretary of the as- 
sociation, together with a statement of explana- 
tion from the officer with whom the book is 
deposited." 

When the book was "returned by the 
master to the secretary of the associa- 
tion" the seaman was, of course, on the 
blacklist and could not thereafter obtain 
employment on any association vessel. In 
the amendment to this rule the Lake Car- 
riers have succeeded in making the black- 
listing feature of the "welfare plan" even 
more vicious and irresponsible than for- 
merly. The following is the new rule : 

"The entries for convenience may be 'good' 
or 'fair' as the case may be, in the best judg- 
ment of the master or chief engineer, based upon 
actual performance of duty, and the book re- 
turned to the person named therein where the 
entry is good or fair, and where service cannot 
be so described, the space for description of ser- 
vice should be canceled with strokes of the 
pen, without comment in the book. In cases of 
desertion or violation of the pledge or other 
gross misconduct, the master shall return the 
book to the secretary of the association, to- 
gether with his or the chief engineer's explana- 
tion." 

Perhaps it is true, as claimed by its 
officials, that the Lake Carriers' Asso- 
ciation intended, by the adoption of the 
new rule, to make the blacklist less dras- 
tic. If that was really the intention of the 
association it is another example of the 
truth that shipowners can not, in the very 
nature of things, legislate in the interest 
of seamen. The amended rule is worse 
than the old. Ships' officers who would 
not like to actually deprive a seaman of his 
discharge book, because such a proceeding 
was too much like common robbery, will 
not hesitate in putting a little pen scratch 
in the character column. 

"Canceled with strokes of the pen." 
What a world of meaning there will be in 
those little ink scratches. When the sailor 
presents the Ijook for future employment, 
as the rules of the "welfare plan" require, 
he will find his chances for earning a living 
have been "canceled." But he is not to be 
told this openly and squarely. Such is not 
the way of "welfare plan" schemers. In- 
stead he is to be kept waiting around the 
shipping offices, hoping against hope that 



he will get a chance to ship. But, so far 
as the Lake Carriers' Association is con- 
cerned, his very existence has been quietly 
"canceled with strokes of the pen." Black- 
listed, branded as an outlaw from his trade, 
compelled to carry and exhibit the tell-tale 
mark that bars him, when he is finally 
starved out, discovers the truth, and recog- 
nizes that he is on the blacklist, his case 
will serve to put fear into the hearts of all 
the other men. Such is "welfare" work and 
methods. And this is to be done "without 
comment in the book." What mockery! 
As though the canceling "strokes of the 
pen" were not comment of the most effect- 
ive and deadly nature. Right here let it 
be remembered that the way sailors pro- 
nounce "welfare" is H-E-L-L F-A-R-E. 

V. A. Ol.ander. 



TOO MUCH "FRIGGING." 



Among the many letters of inquiry re- 
ceived at the offices of the Seamen's Union, 
from men who are sailing on non-union 
ships, is one of particular interest because 
of certain details it furnishes regarding 
working hours. It is addressed to V. A. 
Olander, the general secretary of the Lake 
Seamen's Union, and is dated from Con- 
neaut, Ohio. For reasons plain to all who 
know of the Lake Carriers' blacklisting 
methods, everything that might serve to 
identify the writer, including his name and 
the name of the ship, is omitted from the 
following copy of the letter: 
Dear Sir: 

I have made up my mind to join the Union. 
Please let me know how I can join. It's getting 
fierce on some of these boats. I quit the . . . 
at Ashtabula yesterday . . . Last trip we 
made Ashtabula about 4 o'clock on Thursday 
morning. I was on watch, came on at midnight. 
We didn't get tied up until 6 o'clock. After 
breakfast we were turned to at painting. At 
noon wc shifted under the rigs. After dinner 
more painting. About half past 8 that night we 
got unloaded. By the time the tug let go the 
tow line outside the piers, it was nearly 11 
o'clock. I had been on deck over 22;/^ hours. 
At midnight I went on watch again until six in 
the morning. So you see out of thirty hours 
I got only about one hour's sleep. Saturday 
afternoon we went through the Soo and the 
other watch got soaked a couple of hours there. 

We made Duluth right after breakfast on Mon- 
day morning, got loaded by noon, outside by 2 
o'clock. Standing my watch from 12 to 6 in 
the morning, working on deck all morning until 
noon while loading, and then going on watch 
again until six in the evening made it an 
eighteen-hour stretch for me. We had to batten 
down and the other watch didn't get turned in 
until about half past 4, and had to come on deck 
again at 6. They also got it at the Soo on 
their watch below. 

We hit .'\shtabula again about 1 o'clock Sat- 
urday morning, got docked at about 3, called for 
breakfast at 6, and then worked until noon. 
Then I got my money and quit. I figure it out 
this way: out of 9j/ days, which is 228 hours, I 
worked 134 hours. That is an average of over 
14 hours a day. The deckhands got it worse 
and so did the mates. 

Now, I heard something about the Seamen's 
Bill that you are trying to get through Congress. 
\Vill it stop some of this everlasting frigging? 
I saw some circulars about it. My partner just 
told me he heard that the Union delegate will 
be here in Conneaut on Tuesday, so I will see 
him about joining the Union. 

Yours respectfully, etc. 

Comment is unnecessary. The writer 
has described conditions familiar to all men 
on the Great Lakes. The reply to his let- 
ter informed him that the Seamen's bill 
aims to put a stop for all time to just such 
"frigging" as he refers to. The present 
methods of working the crews are mani- 
festly unfair to the men and decidedly un- 



safe to navigation. It is time for a radical 
change. 



LIFEBOATS ON DUTCH STEAMERS. 



The Government of the Netherlands has 
just issued new regulations concerning the 
eciuipment of emigrant steamers and the 
safety appliances to be carried by them. 
Out of this long list of regulations only a 
few may be cited which are of general in- 
terest. Every vessel, whatever may be the 
size, has to carry a minimum of six safety 
buoys, of which at least one must be pro- 
vided with a lighting apparatus to ignite 
automatically when emerged in water. All 
these buoys must be in the form of a 
horse shoe, and have openings from 35 to 
40 centimetres. The number of lifeboats 
to be carried by every vessel is indicated 
by the following table : 

Capacity 

Size of vessel Number In cubic 

In Brit. reg. tons. of boats. metres. 

1,000— 1,500 6 42.5 

2,.=^00— 3.000 6 59.0 

3,000—3,500 8 70.5 

4,000—4,500 8 80.5 

4,500— 5,000 10 93.0 

6,000—6,500 12 116.0 

7,.500— 8,000 12 133.0 

8.000—8,-500 14 141.5 

9,500—10,000 14 155.5 

10,500—11,000 16 164.0 

For every 500 tons above this four addi- 
tional cubic metres have to be provided. 
If the total capacity of the boats is not 
sufficient to accommodate all the persons 
aboard the deficiency has to be made up 
by folding boats, rafts, or other appliances. 
At least one-half of all the lifeboats must 
have sharp bows and sterns, and be 
equipped with airtight tanks, which are to 
increase the carrying capacity by 10 per 
cent. 

Of the other boats, two may be ordi- 
nary ones, but the carrying capacity of 
the remainder must be increased by 5 per 
cent, by an installation of some kind or 
another. In case of the vessel being pro- 
vided with watertight bulkheads thus ar- 
ranged that the flooding of the largest com- 
partment is prevented (like the new boats 
of the Holland-America Line), then the 
additional appliances for safety may be 
reduced by one-half. Every lifeboat must 
be swung out, lowered to the water, and 
overhauled at least once within four 
months. On board all vessels appliances 
to throw lines must be carried, and fire- 
extinguishers and smoke-tight helmets 
have to be placed at easily accessible sta- 
tions. 



.-\ million-shilling aviation fund has 
been inaugurated by the Aerial League of 
the British Empire "to devote special at- 
tention to efforts being made to render 
machines safer. Money prizes will be 
offered to manufacturers with the view of 
promoting that object." 



The "Japanese Contractors' Association" 
is said to have been formed at Honolulu 
by fifty of the leading Japanese builders 
in Hawaii. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



AMERICA'S FUTURE. 



The United States has to-day an area 
nearly four and a half times as great as it 
was in 1783. In 1803, with the Louisiana 
purchase, the territory of this country was 
more than doubled. Steadily we have 
grown until in 1904 the Panama Canal 
zone of 448 square miles was acquired. 
This latest acquisition will mean more to 
the United States than the mere saving of 
time in transporting freight. It will some 
day figure significantly in commanding the 
Pacific Ocean, the future battleground of 
the world, for in this arena Russia, Japan, 
China and the United States will determine 
whether the world is to be dominated by 
the Anglo-Saxon race or by a nation which 
is foreign to most of the ideals which have 
made America great and powerful. 

Says Ward Piatt in "The Frontier": 
"World navigation and world history may 
be divided into three stages : the Mediter- 
ranean, which stands for past history, the 
Atlantic, which means the present, and the 
Pacific, which holds the future. History 
was shifted from the Mediterranean to the 
Atlantic in an attempt to find an ocean 
route to the Orient. ... In the light 
of modern history we are able to appre- 
ciate the immense importance of our every 
accession of territory bordering on the Pa- 
cific. Hawaii in its location is providential. 
Our trade with the Orient steadily increas- 
es. We are sure to dominate the Pacific 
and to exert over the Orient a correspond- 
ingly great influence. The importance of 
the development of the West as a basis of 
this new world influence is apparent." The 
Orient may not be quite so sure about its 
future disposition. It may protest against 
being dominated by the United States even 
to the extent of being "influenced" by it. 
When giant China awakes — -watch out. 
And the Japanese are still to be reckoned 
with. Therefore, let us not be over-con- 
fident. It is exceedingly important that we 
first of all build up our own western fron- 
tier in point of manhood and morals, as 
Ward Piatt suggests, before we calmly talk 
about dominating great and powerful coun- 
tries. We might better learn how to pos- 
sess our own land. 

Rapid has been the growth of our coun- 
tr}^, and many have been the "frontier" 
lines which we have crossed. Just now we 
are thinking and talking much of the "new 
South" and the "new West," with their 
tremendously significant developments. The 
next decade will witness marked advance in 
the growth of cities and the opening up of 
new territory in these modern El Dorados. 
Great wealth will be accumulated and many 
powerful institutions established. Shall 
these be dominated by the spirit of right- 
eousness, or shall mammon reign supreme? 
I?rimarily, it is for the men and the women 
who shall occupy these territories to say, 
but it is incumbent upon the entire coun- 
try to see to it that such development 
shall l)e upon a thoroughly sound basis. 
For America's future development must not 
be entrusted to those who may be influ- 
enced merely by those things which shall 
advance their own itnerests. 

Thomas Carlyle once said, "Ye may 
boast o' vera democracy or any ither 'cracy 
or any kind o' poleetical roobish, but the 
reason why yer laboring folk are so happy 
is that ye have a vost deal o' land for a 
verra few people." Rut the day has gone 



by when the poor man can secure free 
land. We have reached the limit in this 
respect. We are facing a situation similar 
to that in many foreign lands. We have 
become land impoverished through our fool- 
ish generosity in giving railroads, and 
speculators, and land-grabbers the choicest 
sections of our national domain. To-day, 
by the mere fact of his arrival, every imi- 
grant increases the value of the land in 
the United States by $500. Every newborn 
babe has the same eflfect upon land values. 
Rents for the workingmen in our big cities 
have become exorbitant. The percentage of 
the renting farmers is increasing. In spite 
of our remarkable growth in land area 
there is a famine of land for the poor, and 
the poor — the people on the margin — de- 
termine the status and the standards for 
the whole people with regard to national 
prosperity and happiness. 

But if we have failed in the fair and 
equitable distribution of our vast public do- 
main, let us beware of sacrificing our cities 
and our industries and our homes to the 
unscrupulous and the self-seeking, to whom 
the future of America means simply per- 
sonal power and self-aggrandizement. The 
reign of mammon is America's greatest 
peril. — Rev. Charles Stelzle. 



Lloyd's Register statistical sununary of 
vessels totally lost, condemned, etc., during 
the year 1911, shows that the total loss 
from the register from the above causes 
during the year was 629,326 tons, spread 
over 636 vessels, of which 305 of 447,087 
tons gross were steamers, and 331 of 180,- 
239 tons net were sailers. The causes 
were : Steamers — abandoned, 7 of 9,063 
tons gross ; burned 18 of 26,881 tons gross ; 
collision, 47 of 56,042 tons gross; foun- 
dered, 49 of 49,594 tons gross; lost, etc., 3 
of 2,879 tons gross ; missing, 28 of 36,410 
tons gross; wrecked, 153 of 268,218 tons 
gross. Sailers — abandoned, 44 of 22,125 
tons; condemned, etc., 23 of 12,900 tons; 
burned 10 of 9,056 tons; collision, 33 of 
11,961 tons; foundered, 26 of 13,629 tons; 
lost, etc., 10 of 3,855 tons ; missing, 16 of 
8,916 tons; wrecked, 169 of 97,797 tons. 
Percentages of tonnage lost to tonnage 
owned were as follows : Norway 3.02, 
Spain 2.90, Sweden 2.35, Russia 2.25, Brit- 
ish Colonies 2.07, Italy 2.07, United States 
2.03, United Kingdom 1.18, France 0.99, 
Holland 0.94, Germany 0.81, Denmark 0.81, 
Austria 0.16. 



For the first time in the commercial his- 
tory of the Philippines copra led all local 
exports during the fiscal year ending June 
30. But its margin over hemp was a nar- 
row one, as $16,514,749 worth of copra was 
exported as against $16,281,830 worth of 
hemp. Next to copra and hemp came 
sugar, with an exportation of $10,400,575. 
Of cigars, $2,660,000 was exported, a bet- 
ter showing than last year, but somewhat 
behind the record for 1910. A half mil- 
lion dollars' worth of hats was exported. 
Rice led all the imports, more than $10,- 
000,000 worth being brought into the is- 
lands. Manufactures of cotton were a close 
second, $9,000,000 worth being imported. 



There were 91,296 swarms of bees in 
Chile at the end of 1911 that produced 
1,452,259 pounds of honey and 236,614 
pounds of wax during that year. 



NOTICE TO SEAMEN. 



IMPORTANT. 



Any seaman who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above sta- 
ted reasons, or because of rules of the so- 
called "Welfare Plan," by any agent or 
representative of the Lake Carriers' Asso- 
ciation or any of its allied concerns, in- 
cluding the masters and officers of the 
ships. Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 
V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Joseph Orlick, last heard of on steamer 
Santa Marie, in 1908, is inquired for by 
Carl Stocket, 71 Main street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Ed Jordan, No. 10415, L. S. U., is inquired 
for by his sister, Mrs. Raynor, 319 Caroline 
Street South, Hamilton. Any one knowing 
his whereabouts please notify the above ad- 
dress. 



LAKE DISTRICT, I. S. U. of A. 

HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

570 West Lake Street, Chicago, III. 
BRANCHES AND AGENCIES. 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, 21 High Street 

Telephone 552. 

TOLEDO, OHIO 54 Main Street 

Telephone Bell East 756. 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbrldge Street, East 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone, New, Broad 385. 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

CONNEAUT, 992 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO. ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 
HEADQUARTERS. 
71 Main street, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Telephone Seneca 48. 

BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 445 LaSalle Avenue 

MILWAUKEE. WIS 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbrldge Street, East 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1814 Fourth Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 
HEADQUARTERS. 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 2295. 
BRANCHES. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 314 N. Clark Street 

ASHTABULA, 74 Bridge Street 

TOLEDO. 54 Main Street 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Bast Woodbrldge Street 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 162 Main Street 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 
MARINE HOSPITALS. 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 
RELIEF STATIONS. 

Ashland, Wis. Ogdensburg, N. Y. 

Ashtabul.a Harbor, O. Oswego, N. Y. 

BufTalo, N. Y. Port Huron, Mich. 

Duluth, Minn. Manitowoc, Wis. 

Escanaba, Mich. Marquette, Mich. 

Grand Haven, Mich. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Green Bay, Mich. Saginaw, Mich. 

Houghton, Mich. Sandusky, O. 

I.,i'^;ngton, Mich. Sault Ste. Mnrle, Mich. 

Manistee, Mich. Sheboygan, Wis. 

Erie, Pa. Superior, Wis. 

Menominee, Mich. Toledo, O, 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



SECRETARY HANSON'S REPORT. 



Officers and Members, International Seamen's 

Union of America. 
Comrades: 

In conjunction with the Quarterly Financial 
Report for the third quarter of 1912, which has 
been audited, as usual, I submit for your infor- 
mation the following: 

I. T. F. Control-Card. 

This oHice has received from the International 
Transport Workers' Federation, with which the 
Union is affiliated, about 15.000 "control-cards." 
These cards are evidently intended to be issued 
to all members of the International Union for 
the purpose of showing the affiliation of each 
individual with the I. T. F., and to credit dues 
paid by such members. It is not intended to 
replace the regular membership books with these 
cards, but to use them as additional credentials. 
Opened to full length the "control-card" meas- 
ures 16 by 5'/i inches. It is in one piece with 
three folds (measuring 4 by 5!4 inches when 
folded), each side being printed in the form of 
four pages, thus making it equivalent to an 
eight page uncut booklet. The language de- 
scribing spaces for entries of dates, names, sig- 
natures, transfers and the stamping of monthly 
dues are printed in German, French and English. 
The rules appear in German, French, English 
and Scandinavian. Each card can be used for 
one year only and the material from which it is 
made is not very durable. 

I do not know whether the rules of the I. T. 
l'. actually require the issuance of these cards, 
or whether their use is optional with affiliated 
unions. I have written to the headquarters at 
Berlin. Germany, for information on the subject, 
so that I may lay the matter before the Union 
in proper shape for action. 

International Membership Book. 

On June 12, 1912. I submitted to all District 
Unions the report of the Committee on Inter- 
national Mcmbcrshi]) Book (Universal Member- 
ship Rook^ as presented to the Baltimore Con- 
vention, and also copy of a similar proposition 
from the Sailors' Union of the Pacific. I re- 
quested that each union compare the two re- 
ports careful!}', and to report to this office not 
later than August 1, 1912, such changes as. they 
might deem necessary, or to submit any new 
proposition on the subject which they believed 
should be considered. I have had no response 
to that request. 

I respectfully suggest, therefore, that each 
District Union which has not alreadv acted on 
the matter, immediately select a Committee on 
International Membership Book, for the purpose 
of considering whether any part of the reports 
submitted thus far appear impractical under the 
laws or rules of their respective unions, or to 
draft new suggestions on the same subject. 
The report of such committees, as approved by 
the respective District Unions, should be for- 
warded to the International office not later than 
Nov. 20, 1912. 

Convention. 

For reasons stated below the following reso- 
lution, relating to date of next convention, \vas 
acted upon and approved by the Executive 
Board: 

"Resolved, That the action of the Board set- 
ting Dec. 2, 1912, as a date for convention be 
and is hereby rescinded; further 

"Resolved, That owing to the present legisla- 
tive situation the 17th convention of this Union 
shall convene on a date to be set by the Execu- 
tive Board after the convening of the United 
States Congress in December; further 

"Resolved, That all district unions are hereby 
requested to elect their delegates to said con- 
vention, having said delegates in readiness and 
subject to call, before Dec. 1, 1912." 

In connection with this it should be remem- 
bered that the Baltimore Convention omitted set- 
ting the date for the next convention (see 1911 
Proceedings). The matter was afterwards taken 
up in an Executive Board meeting and the date 
selected was the first Monday in Dec, 1912. 
Later developments have made that date imprac- 
tical. The Seamen's Bill, which was passed by 
the House of Representatives, was laid over in 
the Senate for further hearings until one week- 
prior to the convening of Congress in December. 
The action of the next session of Congress will 
have a far-reaching effect upon all seamen. If 
the Seamen's Bill is enacted into law, and our 
status as workers and citizens raised accordingly 
we must prepare to do our share in securing 
the enforcement of the new laws. If, on the 
other hand. Congress fails to take final action we 
must lay plans for greater and more persistent 
agitation to secure the legislation needed. In 
either event no intelligent action can be taken 
by our organization until it is known definitely 
what Congress will do on our bill. 

The District Unions shoubl elect delegates to 
the 17th Convention before December 1, and 
such elected delegates should thereafter keep in 
touch with the headquarters of their respective 
district unions, so that all can respond to the 
convention call v^'hen notification of the date is 
sent out. I feel safe in saying that such notice 
will be forwarded to the Unions at least two 
weeks in advance of the date which will be se- 
lected for meeting at Seattle. Immediately upon 
the adoption of the resolution above quoted I 



notified the secretaries of all district unions, by 
letter, under date of Sept. 23, 1912. 
Charters. 

Three applications for charters have been re- 
ceived since my last report. The first is from 
the Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders' 
Union of the .-\tlantic and Gulf, Mr. Oscar Cor- 
neliuson. Secretary pro tem., Boston, Mass. I 
referred this application to the Atlantic District 
Unions in accordance with .\rticle II, Sec. 2, of 
the International Constitution. I have since been 
advised of the following action on this matter: 
The Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
the .Atlantic has approved the application; the 
Harbor Boatmen's Union of New York has not 
yet acted; the Sailors' Union of the .Atlantic has 
notified this office that action on the application 
had been deferred one month. 

The second application for charter is from the 
Tidewater Boatmen's Union of New York, and 
the third application is from a Sailors' Union at 
P.ilmas .Altas, Porto Rico. These will also be 
referred to the .Atlantic District Unions for ac- 
tion in accordance with the International Con- 
stitution. 

District Unions. 

All the District Unions appear to be making 
fair progress, and there have been no very 
important developments since my last report. 
Only one organizer is now being paid by the 
International, and his services will probably be 
discontinued within a month. 

Some of the affiliated unions still fail to send 
reports to the International Secretary-Treasurer, 
evidently assuming that it is sufficient to send 
such documents to the Secretary of the district 
union at this address. But that does not furnish 
copies for the International files. 

\\ith best wishes to all comrades, I remain, 
Fraternally yours, 

T. A. HANSON, 
Secretary-Treasurer. 



LABOR'S ECONOMIC PLATrORM. 



WORKING HOURS IN FRANCE. 



The first edict fi.xing the duration of hours 
of labor in France was the decree of Sep- 
tember 9. 1848, the first section of which was 
as follows : "The day of the laborer in 
manufactures and workshops shall not exceed 
12 hours effective work." 

On November 2, 1892, an elaborate statute 
was enacted governing the labor and employ- 
ment of children, women, and girls in indus- 
trial establishments, but without changing the 
existing regulation as to the duration of daily 
labor for vvorkingmen and adult male oper- 
atives. 

Then catne *,he law of March 30, 1900, 
which provided that in factories, machine 
shops, quarries, or work.shops of whatever 
nature, public or private, which employ on 
the same premises adult men, together with 
women and minors of either sex. as specified 
by the law of November 2. 1892, the labor 
day of no ernployce should exceed 11 hours. 
Paragraph 2 of the same law provided in 
respect to all employees covered by the pre- 
ceding paragraph 1. that at the end of two 
years from the promulgation of the present 
act (March 30. 1902) the legal day of labor 
shall be reduced to 10^ hours, and at the 
end of two years thereafter (March 30, 1904) 
to 10 hours. 

Such has been the process by which the 
working day of the French industrial em- 
ployee was reduced from 12 to 10 hours. But 
it was found in practice that the strict en- 
forcement of this limit entailed difficulties in 
the management of certain industries, and on 
March 28, 1902, an important decree was 
issued providing that in certain specified cases 
the duration of the day's labor of adult male 
workmen might be increased from the pre- 
scribed limit by the addition of one, two. 
or more hours, according to the nature of the 
labor and the requirements of the case. 



British railway tire and axle exports 
show great increases, and reached 12.063 
tons, worth $1,135,000, during the first half 
of 1912. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

'11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted into 
law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
sj'stem in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, 'that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of United States Gov- 
ernment Postal Savings Banks. 

INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OP AMERICA. 

(Continued from Page 5.) 



MARfNE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
S.\N FRANCISCO, Cat, 91 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SE.-VTTLE, Wash., 140S% Western Ave.. P. O. Box 
875. 

PORTLAND. Ore.. 101 N. Front St. 

SAN PEDRO. Cal.. 123 Fifth St.. P. O. Box 574. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 
Headquarter^: 
.^.\.S FRANCISCO, Cal.. 1:; Market St. 

Branches: 
SE.\TTLE. Wash., 209-210 Powell Building, P. O 
Box 1335. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 54. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 13S. 

Branches: 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

I..\ CONNER, Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN, Wash.. P. O. Bo.x: 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGErO\\'N. Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER. Ore. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2). 

KETCHIKAN. 
I.ORING. Alaska. . ,, 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PE'IERSBL'RG. Alaska. 



Demand the union, label upon all purchases' 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. 93 Steuart St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, Wash.. 84 Seneea St., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA, Ore.. P. O. Box 138. 



The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be procured by seamen at 
any of the above-mentioned places; 
also at the headtjuarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASIA 

29 ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY. N. S. W. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 

(Continued from Page 3.) 



into a stream called Freshwater Brook, and 
he was given five minutes in which to get 
out of town. Recently on his way to a 
meeting hall Organizer J\Iiles was accosted 
by a plain clothes policeman and asked if 
he had a permit to carry firearms, to which 
he replied that he had not, neither did he 
carry any. Upon leaving the hall he was 
forcibly seized by the police and searched 
for firearms, although none was found. 
During the process of searching missiles 
were thrown at the organizer, and after 
the search he returned to the hall. After 
remaining at the hall for a time the or- 
ganizer proceeded to a street car to return 
to Springfield, ^^'hile on his way some 
one fired a bullet from a catapult or air- 
gun, grazing his forehead and passing 
throiigh his hat. Two workmen accom- 
panied the organizer to the car and were 
afterwards badly beaten up, one of their 
assailants being a special constable, who, 
when recognized, ran away. While Or- 
ganizer Miles is not seriously injured, his 
rough treatment left him somewhat bruised. 
Efiforts are being continued to organize 
these people, and the American Federation 
of Labor has, through the State Federa- 
tion, demanded that an investigation be 
made of the conditions existing whereby 
organizers cannot receive the same treat- 
ment as do other citizens of our country. 
The foreign element in these factories wel- 
comes organization, and no doubt exists but 
that an effective union will finally be se- 
cured by the organizers of the American 
Federation of Labor. 



Miners Victims of Greed. 

The Intelligencer, published in Wheeling, 
\y. Va., in commenting upon the contro- 
versy now existing between the coal miners 
in the Paint and Cabin Creek coal fields, 
says in part : "One of the most serious 
complaints of the striking miners is against 
the 'pluck me' store system. In these mine 
communities the maintenance of a store by 
the mine companies is almost a necessity, 
but it is not necessary to charge exorbitant 
prices for all goods sold to miners, oi is it 
necessary to compel miners to buy of the 
company store should they be able to buy 
elsewhere. The following is a list of prices 
charged in the company stores, and is 
sworn to by the miners before the investi- 
gating commission : Flour, $9.25 per bar- 
rel ; breakfast bacon, 25 cents per pound; 
tomatoes, 20 cents a can ; peaches, 30 cents 
a can; corn, 15 cents a can; apricots, 25 
cents a can; beans, loose white, LS cents 
])er quart; jiotatoes, $2.40 a bushel; lard, 
15 cents per pound; 12j/ cents per pound 
for sugar ; miner's oil, $1 a gallon ; powder, 
$1.75 per keg; miner's squibs, 15 cents per 
box. It will be seen that this partial list 
of prices averages from 10 per cent, to 50 
per cent, higher than the average market 
price of the same goods generally. The 
company store selling at such prices robs 
those who buy of it. Miners compelled to 
buy of it lose a considerable portion of 
their wages. . . . Legislation reaching 
the 'pluck me' store evil might very prop- 
erly be enacted. The industrial interests 
of West Virginia are too important and 
the cost of such disturbances as now jire- 
vail in the mine regions is too great to 
permit a continuance of the reckless, hap- 



hazard methods that seem to exist in our 
mine sections. The 'pluck me' store and 
the armed guard must go. Decent living 
conditions can be introduced in our mine 
regions. Men must be paid living wages 
and be allowed to spend the wage free and 
independently. The plea against organized 
labor is unjust and foolish. The miners 
of West \'irginia are not going to play into 
the hands of the miners of Ohio and 
Pennsylvania. They have ample intelli- 
gence to protect their own interests, and 
if organized into a union they will not 
only be able to protect themselves against 
unfair operators, but they will be equally 
able to protect their interests in their dis- 
trict against the demands of competing dis- 
tricts." 



For Mine Safety. 

The I'ureau of Mines has just issued a 
bulletin in reference to devices for life- 
saving. H. M. Wilson, engineer in charge 
of the Pittsburg experiment station of the 
bureau, says: "Experience indicates that 
the best re.sults are effected by turning into 
first-aid work at least one mine worker in 
every ten. This precaution insures the 
presence near the place of accident of 
enough first-aid men to give prompt relief. 
Public exhibits and contests stimulate the 
interest of miners in organizing a first-aid 
corps and keeps them prepared for eflfect- 
ive service. Such exhibits and contests 
have for several years been held annually 
by groups of coal companies in the anthra- 
cite region, and within the last year they 
have been held by the employes in various 
other coal mining sections. The interest 
thus aroused promotes prompt treatment 
of injuries by persons skilled in first-aid 
methods and reduces the miners' loss of 
time by about 90 per cent. Where mine 
operators take an interest in and encourage 
first-aid work a better feeling develops, 
resulting in improved hospital and sanitary 
conditions, improved living and housing 
conditions, and the general advancement 
of tlie miner and mining industry." 



In the Maw^ of Mammon. 

Reports from the financial center of New 
York show that as a general thing the rail- 
roads in this country are increasing their 
earnings and net revenues. It is reported 
that the gross earnings of the Northern 
Pacific are expected to show an increase 
in gross of about $800,000 for the last 
quarter. The increase of the Great North- 
ern was $1,500,000, or 16 per cent. Last 
year's gain for the latter road over 1910 
was $254,000. September was the biggest 
month in the road's history, with gross 
earnings at the rate of $90,000,000 per an- 
num. The Central of New Jersey, Read- 
ing's gold mine, showed an increase of 
about $500,000 in gross, of which $384,985 
was saved for net, a gain of more than 25 
per cent. The Norfolk and Western, Penn- 
sylvania's protege, which may soon be ab- 
sorbed by the larger road and have its 6 
])er cent, dividends guaranteed, showed a 
gain of $383,961 in gross and $143,692 in 
ncl. The Pennsylvania and its subsidiaries 
own something more than a majority of 
the Norfolk and Western stock, which is 
to say that they draw about $2,500,000 
frf)m it in dividends every year. Larger 
gross and net earnings for the year have 
been re])orted by the American Telephone 
and Telegraph Company, but the surplus 



for the stock is only 8.84 per cent., against 
9.83 per cent in 1911. Payment, however, 
had to be made on $57,000,000 more capital. 
Income from holdings of other companies 
is $26,500,000, an increase for the year of 
10 ])er cent. The October unfilled tonnage 
orders of the Steel Corporation sho\vs an- 
other increase. An indication of the great 
activities in the iron and steel trade is the 
amount of the monthly pay roll for the 
Pittsburg district. In September this 
reached $35,000,000, compared with $30,- 
000,000, the largest previous month in the 
historv of the trade. 



Arraigns Contract System. 
(iovernor Francis E. McGovern recently 
opened the fourth annual meeting of the 
American Institute of Criminal Law and 
Criminology in Milwaukee, Wis., with an 
address, in which he discussed criminal 
trials and penal institutions in Wisconsin, 
paying especial attention to the system of 
contract convict labor employed at the 
State prison at Waupun. "Under the con- 
tract system, as we have it, this State re- 
ceives 65 cents a day for the labor of the 
prisoners at Waupun. Under the present 
arrangements with the contractor, the Para- 
mount Knitting Company, the public fur- 
nishes some buildings, heat, lights and pow- 
er, in addition to the labor of the pris- 
oners. Subtracting these items there re- 
mains only about 40 cents a day as com- 
pensation for the work of the convicts, 
many of whom, at ])roper employment, are 
capable of earning from $1.50 to $3 per 
day. It is not strange, therefore, that 
the Legislature, at its last session, was 
compelled to appropriate $50,000 a year to 
maintain this institution. There can be 
little doubt that this plan is wasteful and 
unjust to the taxpayers of the State, unfair 
to free labor, and outside manufacturers, 
and discouraging to prisoners. There is, 
indeed, little to commend it except that it 
furnishes steady employment. This is one 
of the subjects now under investigation by 
the Wisconsin Board of Public AfTairs, and 
I trust when the inquiry is finished some 
action will be taken by the Legislature 
respecting it." 



New Rules in Force. 

On October 1 the new regulations affect- 
ing safety equipment of sea-going, coast- 
wise, river and bay craft, which were 
framed by the Department of Commerce 
and Labor, following the Titanic disaster, 
and modified recently, went into effect. 
( )ccan-going vessels all year round are re- 
f|uired to carry life-saving equipment suf- 
ficient for everybody on board. All boats 
except those plying on rivers must have 
in winter lifeboats and rafts enough to 
take care of all the crew. Summer coast- 
wise crafts must carry sufficient safety 
equipment for 60 per cent, of all on board, 
and vessels on lakes, bays and sounds must 
carry equipment sufficient for 30 per cent, 
of all on board. 



A Renter dis])atch from Wellington says 
that 16,000 Europeans and 665 Maoris have 
been granted old-age pensions during the 
l)ast year, amounting to $1,975,000. The 
( )ld-.Age I'ensions Act first came into 
oi)crati()u in 18W, since when 35,000 pen- 
sions have been granted, totaling $17,310,- 
140. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Labor News. 



The 3000 employes at 'the mines of 
the Nevada Consolidated Copper 
Company at Ely went on strike Oc- 
tober 2, executing as complete a 
tie-up as that at Bingham, Utah. 

Division 594, Amalgamated Asso- 
ciation of Street and Electric Rail- 
way employes at Springfield, Ohio, 
a local recently organized, has se- 
cured an agreement increasing the 
schedule of wages 1 cent and 2 cents 
per hour. This agreement will bring 
to the 130 motormen and conductors 
in that city an additional wage ag- 
gregating $5,500 per year. 

The Winston-Salem, N. C, branch 
of the Granite Cutters' Association 
has suspended work in the employ- 
ment of one firm against the "task- 
ing" system. The shed foreman, act- 
ing for the firm, laid down a certain 
task that men must do to retain em- 
ployment, and when the firm, through 
the foreman, refused to withdraw 
the notice all of the union men re- 
fused to continue at work, they re- 
belling against this system of eco- 
nomic slavery. It is doubtful if non- 
union men can be found to take the 
union men's places, for even to non- 
union granite cutters, if any can be 
found, the tasking system does not 
look good. 

What portended to be the biggest 
strike in the building industry that 
New York has ever encountered was 
recently averted by an agreement 
to refer to arbitration the demands 
of the Sand and Excavation Team- 
sters against the Contractors' Pro- 
tective Association. .'Xs a matter of 
fact, the strike was already in 
progress, and work on the new sub- 
way and many buildings throughout 
the city had been stopped, placing 
in idleness between 30.000 and 40.000 
building mechanics. The strike was 
for the renewal of an agreement 
which expired last November, in- 
cluding a slight increase in wages 
and changes in working conditions. 

As a result of the street car strike 
in Boston an indictment charging 
coercion has been returned by the 
Suffolk county grand jury against 
the Boston Elevated Railway Com- 
pany. The indictment contains four 
accounts. The first two charges the 
coercion of two employes into an 
agreement to become members of an 
organization of "loyal" employes as 
a condition to their continuing in the 
employ of the corporation. The 
persons, whose names were unknown 
to the jurors, were coerced into an 
agreement not to join a labor union 
as a condition precedent to securing 
employment with the company. 

A new line of work has been dis- 
covered for women. The Rapid 
Transit Company of Philadelphia is 
experimenting with women conduct- 
ors on the new pay-as-you-enter 
cars. Two women have been de- 
tailed as conductors on the new cars, 
and while the officials of the Transit 
Company have not commented on 
the result of the experiment, it is 
said that they are pleased. The 
usual reasons are assigned by those 
who were instrumental in making the 
experiment. One official made the 
statement that "the chief aim of the 
company is to do away with as many 
of the causes of labor difficulties as 
possible." In other words, the of- 
ficials of the company not only de- 
sire that their employes shall be 
docile, but also satisfied with a wage 
below the usual : '.andard. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



Residence Phone Ind. Green 185 



School Phone Ind. A 4484 



MARSHALL'S 
Navigation School 



Day and Night 
REASONABLE TERMS 
204 Grand Trunk Pacific Dock 



SEATTLE 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 
UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



Headquarters For 

Union Made Clothing 

FURNISHINGS, HATS AND SHOES 

At 

WESTERMAN & SCHERMER 

220 and 222 First Avenue, South 

SEATTLE, WASH. 

Bonney-Watson Co. 

UNDERTAKERS 
3rd and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 
Preparing: bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or 
telegraph promptly attended to 
Phone, Main 13 
Independent: Elliott 254 



ALASKA HOTEL 

Corner Western and Seneca 

The newest 25-cent house in town. 

New building, new furniture. 

Special attention to mariners. 

FREE BATHS 

Special Weekly Rates 

PETER DESMORE. Proprietor. 



Seattle, Wash., Letter LUt. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce. letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to call 
or have their mall forwarded during that 
period, they should notify the Agent to 
hold mall until arrival. 



Aagaard, A. 

Abrahamsen, Jo- 
hannes 

Adalfsen, Oscar 

Andresen, Ingvald 

Anderson, Sam 

Anderson, Halgar 
Thome 

Anderson, Otto 

Aronsen. Halfdan 

Alonzo, I. 

Anderson, Iljalmar 

Anderson, Fred 

Baushaok, E. 

Baam, R. 

Rakker. Hakow 

Blair, Frank 

Boison. .Torgen 

Boax. Henrik 

Burgess, M. 

Benedixon, Nick 

Bprentsen, Alfred 

Blommendal, J. 

Boyd. John 

Coughlan, C. 

Christensen, H. T. 

Cotton, John 

Dickenson, D. 

Hon ell y. J. H. 

Davidson, .Takob 

Donnett, .Tohn 

Klsted. John 

Krlandes, Louis 

Erkhardt, Charley 

Krikson. Edvard 

Firk. John 

F.iPlstPd. K. M. 

Fieri riksen. Berger 

Frammps. Ivar 

Oelilor. F. 

C.undorsen, L.. S. 

Cibhons. J. 

Oinis, G. 

Hansen, H. O. 

Hansen. Nels S. 

Hakonsen. Ing\'ar 

Hansen, Simon 

Haudt. W. 

Haltnoss. M. 

Hegg. Martin 

IToIm, H. P. 

Hall. G. A. 

Tvorsen. Arthur 

Ivessen, I. 

Jacobson, A. John 

.Tacobson. Johan 

.Tacobson. .T. Martin 

Jensen. John G. 

Jpn.«en. .Taoob -419 

.Tensen. Hans 

■Tensen. .Tohn 

Jolianson. H. Tobias 

.Tohnson. Henry 

Johnson. Gust. 

Johnson, C. W. 

Johnson. C. J. -1506 

.Tohnson, Andrew 

Johanson, Einar 

.Tohan.<!en. Aug. W. 

.Tonsen, P. 

.Tohanson. O. K. 

Kaiser, R. 

K'err, Andrew 

Tfermagorah, A. 

Kopatz, C. 



Kneblikoff, I. 
Lacey, Thos. E. 
I^arson, Anton 
I^arsen, Peter 
Larsen, Axel 
Larsen, Henry 
Ijarsen, Eric J. 
I^arsen, P. O. 
Lathi, J. H. 
Lind. John 
Lipvens. John 
Lindgren, L. 
Luby, W. 
Ludwig, .Tack 
I.,arson, E. G. 
T^orin, A. Ia. 
I^ee. C. 

Martinsen. C. M. 
Mattson, Olaf 
Mabe, J. 

Martinsen, Ingvald 
Maatson. Olaf 
Manlprs. C 
Magnusen. T^ars 
Meisland. TTans 
Moller, J. B. 
Muir, James 
Miller. .Tames 
Marx. Thorvald 
Maitak. M. 
MfPherson, .Tames 
McCormack. J. 
MrKpown. Thos. 
McKlttrick. J. 
Mikelsen, Peter 
Mikkelsen. IC. -1620 
Nelson, Birger 
Nielsen. H. J. 
Nilson, A. -!>02 
Nilsen. .Tack 
Nikander. A. E. 
Nolan, James 
Noshis, C. 
Nilson, Alfins 
Nelson. Adolf 
Oberg. Oscar 
Oberhauser. John 
Ohison, Ben 
Olssen, Charles 
Olsen, Gust 
Olsen, Hans P. 
Olsen. Trygue L. 
Olsen. Anton 
Otto. W^. 
Owens, J. H. 
Oehmichen. Fred 
Olsen. Nick 
Olsen. Edvin 
Pederson. Alfred 
Person. Charley 
Plant. Billie 
Pommer. Alex 
Pederson. .Tohn 
Powell. Gus 
Rasmussen, R. -52.'> 
Reinink. H. 
Rosenwald. I- 
Ratcliffe, L. 
Sack. J. -2428 
Ralonen, John 
Straus. W. 
Strand, Chas. 
Swenson, B. -1932 
Steen, T. C. 
Steen. Jens 




Seattle Navigation School 

Open the entire year, 
and in touch with 
latest requirements. 
Candidates thoroughly 
prepared for License 
of any grade; Master, 
Mate or FMlot: Ocean, 
Coast or Inland, 

By CAPT. W. J. SMITH, 
Nautical Expert, 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical College, 
Licensed Master of Ocean steam and 
sail vessels (unlimited), and Master 
and Pilot for Inland waters. Author of 
"Self-Instructor in Navigation," Author 
of "Practical Compass Adjustment." 
Compass Adjuster. 

507 MARITIME BUILDING 
911 Western Ave., SEATTLE, Wash. 

Phones: 
School, Main 3300. Res. Queen Anne 664 



EUREKA, CAL. 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St. 

Seattle, Wash. 



Vernon W. Buck Arthur C. McLane 

Carl G. Benson 

BUCK, BENSON & McLANE, 

Lawyers and Proctors In Admiralty 

Free Advice to Seamen. 

126S Empire Building, 

Seattle, Wash. 

Vi tala og skrifva de nordiska spraag, 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer in 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squlre-Latlmer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



Tanike, Alfred 
Taylor, Ed. 
Tangeros, Ole 
Thompson, Anton 
Thorsen, Torger 
Tessner, R. 
Wartnau. W. 
Werner, J. 
Wedeking, W. 
Winzens. G. 



Zerkel. W. 
Zimnier, W. 

Registered Letter. 
Krager, F. 

Packages. 
Borjensen, C. A. 
Miller. J,. 
Nilsen. L J. 
I'elersen. M. 
Zcckel, \V. 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Anderson, Erick 
B. 

Androlio, A. 
Anderson, Otto 
Abrams, Geo. 
Buckmer, — 
Brodig, — 
Balda, Alfonso 
Bergstrom. Paul 
Brodig, W. G. 
Blakstad, Charles 
Corty, C. 
Cordia, Peter 
Christensen, Peter 

C. 
(^olman, E. 
Dennis, Charles 
Dorff. William 
Degroot, George 
Erickson, L. 
Eugene. John 
Englund, E. H. 
Engstrom. M. R. 
Frederlckson, H. E. 
Fristrom, Ivar 
Oegory, Jas. 
Grove. Al 
Galleberg. Martin 
Glaas, Waldemar 
Glannus, Alex. 
Heinas, Charles 
Hellsten, Gus 
Hultman. A. 
Haga, John A. 
Irwin, Robert 
.Taase, Warren 
•Tohnson, Jack 
.Tohnson. George 
Johnson, Chris 
Johnsen. Halvor J. 
Johnsen, Ole 
Johnsen, John 
Jensen, Chris 
.Tohnson, Axel 
.Tohnson, H. 
Jensen, Robert 
Kealer, James 
Kutsberg, Gustaf 
Kenney, .Tames 
Kerme. Fr. 
T-anc, Chas. 
T,ech, Paul 
T^arsson. John 
Lundqulst, A. 



Larsen, Engvald 
Lane, Charles 
Larsen, Soren 
Lerksher, Heinrlch 
McMahon, Jack 
Mathisen. Harry 
Mattheu, J. 
Macrae, Alexander 
Matson, Ellis F. 
Meyer, Dick 
Morris, Frank 
Monlnger, Joseph 
Neuling, Geo. A. 
Normen, John 
Norman, I^udwig 
Nicl.son, Ed. 
Olsen, John A. 
Olsen, Andy 
Olsen, Severin 
Ohlsen, Charles 
Opheim, Lars 
Orlik. Joseph 
Pedersen. Rasmus 
Petersen, Peter 
Perouse, Andre 
Peterson, Maruets 
Post, A. 
Raetz. Aug. 
Rasmussen, R. Th. 
Roost. Otto 
Rasmussen. Pete 
Rennert, Fred H. 
Rlchter, Hans 
Rose, Luis C. 
Roche, John 
Sanders. Chas. 
Schmidt. Frits 
Smith. Ernest 
Shroder, Er. 
Sjoholm, Waldemar 
Stephen. M. 
Swensson, John B. 
Splnessen, Kurwald 
Tamford, A. 
Turner, A. 
Turner, F. 
Iladren. G. F. 
Wall, A. 

Wenner. Edward 
Wold, Statius 
Wickstrom. Giistav 
Young, Herbert 
Zunk. Bruno. 
Zimmerman. F. 



SMOKE 

The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union -made cigars. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

532 Second Street - - Eureka, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY &. YOUNG 
Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparllla and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
-■Vlso bottlers and dealers In Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



Herman Schulze 

-CIGAR MANUFACTURER - 
Cigars at Wholesale and Retail 

439 SECOND STREET 

Corner F EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only 

SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGOKD, Proprietor 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates 

Front Street, between C and D 

EUREKA, CAL. 



For 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 

or 

A SQUARE MEAL 

Try 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 

AMERICAN EXCHANGE HOTEL 
Headquarters for Scandlnavlant 

OLUF KARLSEN, Proprietor 

GOOD BOARD AND LODGING 

By the Day, Week or Month. Meals 25c. 

First Street, between D and E 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Telephone Main 445 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

THE COSMOPOLITAN 

Furnished Rooms, Club Rooms. Bll- 
li.ard and Pool Tables. Reading Room 
with latest Swedish, Finn and No™ 
wegian newspapers. 

BARBER SHOP 
125 D. St., Eureka, Cal. 

EI). SWANSON, Prop. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN. 
San Francisco. 
Anderson, William Knudsen, David 



Anderson, Agnes 
Anderson, Oscar 
Carlson, Gust 
Erikson, John 
Erikson, Johan 
Gri.=s, Anton 
Jansson. Ellas 



Lanberg, A. 
Ix)wberg. A. W. 
Nelson, M. 
Sandset. O. -117 
Smith, Phil 
Spooner, Soil 
.'^tromberg. Erik 



Johansen. S. Johan T.iuson, Frank 

..fT'^"'"^'^^'^"'' °^ THE OWNERSHIP, 
MANAGEMENT, CIRCULATION, ETC 
of Coast Seamen's Journal published 
weekly at San Francisco, required by the 
Act of August 24, 1912. 

Note.— This statement is to be made In 
duplicate, both copies to be delivered 
by the publisher to the postmaster, who 
will send one copy to the Third Assistant 
Postmaster General (Division of Classi- 
fication), Washington, D. C, and retain 
the other in the files of the post ofllce. 

Editor. Walter Macarthur. San Fran- 
-Isco, Cal.; Managing Editor, None; 
Business M.inager, Paul Scharrenberg, 
San Francisco. Cal.; Publisher. Sailors' 
Union of the Pacific; Owners: (If a cor- 
poration, give names and addresses of 
stockholders liolding 1 per cent, or more 
of total amount of stock.) Sailors' 
I'nion of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal. 
Known bondholders, mortgagees, and 
other security holders, holding 1 per cent 
or more of total amount of bonds, mort- 
gages, or other securities: None. 

Average number of copies of each Issue 
of this publication sold or distributed, 
through the mails or otherwise, to paid 
subscribers during the six months pre- 
ceding the date of this statement. (This 
information is required from daily news- 
papers only.) 

PAUL SCHARRENBERG, 
Business Manager. 

Sworn to and subscribed before me 
this 16th day of Oct.. 1912. 
(Seal) JAMES H. STIRLING. 

Notary Public in and for the City and 

County of San Francisco. California. 
(My commission expires Sept. 11, 1915). 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 
HUOTARI &i CO. 

Gents' Furnishings, Boots and Shoes 

Groceries and Notions 
We sell everything, and sell at right 
prices. Union-made Goods Specialty 

You Know the Place 
320 S. F. St., near Sailors' Union Hall 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service 



Phone 691 

ABERDEEN, WASH 



Stand: 
At Sailors' Union Office 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS. 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



vWORKERS UNION. 



UNIOlWlSTAMP 

Factory 



Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 




ROYAL CIGAR STORE 

Headquarters for Union-made Cigars 

and Tobacco. Red Seal Cigar a 

Specialty. The Place to get 

your Sea Stock. 

Agency for Gloss Union Steam 

Laundry. OLE LUND, Prop. 

S. E. Cor. of Herron and F Sts., 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 
Abreast of Sailors' Union Hall. 



When In Aberdeen Trade at 
BEE HIVE. 

Very best union made Hickey Shirts, 
Oil Clothing, Eureka Boots, Hats, Shoes, 
Underwear, Beddings, Tobaccos, and no- 
tions for seafaring men. 

JUKKA SAHLSTEIN 
304 South F St., Aberdeen, Wash. 
Near Sailors' Union Hall 
Open Evenings. 



OLD TOWN, TACOMA, WASH. 

hTITmallek 

2320 NORTH 30th STREET 

Notice to our Customers: This place will be known as the "Red Front." 
Seamen's Outfitters, Shoes, Rubber Boots, "Sawyer's" OH Clothing, Flannel Shirts, 

Quilts, Blankets, Etc. 

"Boss of the Road" Overalls, 75c; Hickory Shirts, 50c; Everything Union Made. 

I will give you a square deal as I want your trade. 

Remember the "Red Front," one block north of Union Hall, Old Town. 



THE PIONEER 

Union Made Cigars and Tobacco 

a Specialty 

Wholesale and Retail 

Pool and Billiards 

412 Herron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

G. L. WILLISCRAFT, Prop. 



Headquarters for 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods 

Boots, Shoes, Hats, Etc. 

ALEXANDER'S WHITE HOUSE 

403 East Heron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

next to Burnett's Jewelry Store 



PORTLAND, OR. 
WM. JOHN.SON 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 

For Quick Service Call East 4441. Resi- 
dence Phone Tabor 3. I give you a Claim 
Clieck for your baggage at home. Give 
me your work or we both lose money. 

Office: 
41 UNION AVE. - - PORTLAND, ORE. 

P. ROSENSTEIN J. G. WOOD 

Workingmen's Store 

Importers and Dealers in 
FINE CUSTOiVI AND READY MADE 

CLOTHING 

Gent's Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, Etc. 
23 N. 3d St., nr. Burnside, Portland, Ore. 
Tel. Main 8295 ROSENSTEIN BROS. 



Phone 342 



Box 843 



HOTEL OXFORD 

JOHN GRONOW, Prop. 

Rooms by the week $1.50 up. 

208-12 HERRON STREET 

Aberdeen, Washington 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 

FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively In Union-Made CIGARS, 
TOBACCO, ETC. Call at his old Red 
Stand on Water Street, Port Townsend. 
Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 
around the corner from the Union Office. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In LIVE 
STOCK, FRESH MEATS AND VEG- 
ETABLES. Shipping supplied at 
lowest rates. :: Port Townsend, Wash. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Pres. 

Port Townsend Mercantile Co, 

(Inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED 
311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: 
Bartlett Wharf, Port Townsend, Wash. 



Tacoma, Wash., Letter List. 

Edward Jansson, John -2203 
Kesber, Karl 

Albert B. Kirwan, Milton L. 
Knappe, Adolph 
Loren, A. L. 
Martin, Louis -1868 
Marikwardt, Carl 
Munster, Fritz 
Nielsen, C. V. 
Olsen, Martin 
Peterson, F. 
Sovig, Martin 
Swanson, Ben 
Veckenstedt, W. 



Anderson, 

-1739 
Anderson, 

-1568 
Anderson, Max 
Bausback, Erwin 
Behrins, Emll 
Benson, Charles 
Bloom, Charles 
Buckland, Wm. 
Carson, James 
Christensen, Albert 
Erikson, John 
Fors, Alfred 
Gronstrom, WilhelmWeerman, Wm. 
Grove. Albert Zornig, Arthur 

Gustafson, Axel 

Eureka, CaL, Letter List. 



THE RED FRONT 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, ETC. 
Union Label Goods 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer In 

Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits 

315 Water St., next to Commercial Bank 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



Alexander, G. L. 
Anderson, Otto 
Benson, S. 
Carlson, Gust 
Christensen, O. M 
Fryktn, Gust 
Gottberg, Henry 
Grant, .John 
Gulliksen, Lars 
Hansen, Hans 
Hansen, J. P. 
Hass, H. 
Horlin, Ernest 
Ivars, Cal. 
Jacobsen, Edy 
Johnson, A. 
Johnsen, Arthur 
Johnson, Halvord 
Jensen, Fredrik 
Lane, Dick 
Larsen, K. L. 
Langevld. Ernest 



Lindblom, Ernest 
Menz, Paul 
Menneky, Fred 
Nilson, Andrew G. 
Nilsen, Julius 
Ogren, Harry 
Olsen, C. 
Paludan, Chas. 
C. Pedersen, Paul 
Pedersen, Martin 
Petterson, Oskar 
Ramsted, A. 
Rawke, Fred O. 
Slnyard, Walter 
Thomas, Joseph W. 
Thompson, Andrew 
Thoresen, Jens 
Wacksmann, Hans 
Wilson, John 
Wallen, L. 
Zebe, Gustav 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Nik Gustof Svanberg Nelson, born 
in Roguna Jamtland, Sweden, 44 
years of age, light brown hair, blue 
eyes, dark beard, last heard of on 
Standard Oil Company's ship Mat- 
toppa, is inquired for by his sister. 
Miss Elise Svanberg, 3953 Twen- 
tieth street, San Francisco, Cal. 

William McGrail, of Baltimore, 
Md., who sailed on the Atlantic and 
Gulf Coasts as cook for a number of 
years, is inquired for by his brotlier, 
George McGrail, 603 Decatur street. 
New Orleans, La. 

The following men, who made 
the trip on the bark Annie Johnson, 
leaving San Francisco on March 21, 
1910, and were paid off at San 
Francisco on June 1, 1910, are in- 
quired for by the Matson Naviga- 
tion Company, San Francisco: Ed. 
Benson, Norway, S3 years, A. B.; 
Nils Johansson, Sweden, 56 years, 
A. B.; Angelino Probaste, Chile, 30 
years, A. B.; F. Sunence, Norway, 
34 years, second mate; R. Kurella, 
Germany, 45 years, carpenter; Her- 
man Johnson, Sweden, 32 years, A. 
B.; P. Allen, France, 40 years, A. B.; 
W. Ellingsen, Sweden, 21 years, A. 
B.; Axel Henriks, Finland, 27 years, 
A. B. The first three named men 
made the round trip and were paid 
off in San Francisco, and the last 
six were paid off in Honolulu. 

Andrew John Anderson, who left 
Aberdeen, Wash., on lumber barge 
Washtura for San Francisco, is in- 
quired for. Any one knowing his 
present whereabouts please notify 
Mrs. Anna Anderson, Aberdeen, 
Wash. 

Salvage money is due to the follow- 
ing seamen, who were members of the 
crew of the steamer Washtenaw, when 
assistance was rendered to a British 
vessel, Leicester Castle, off the east 
coast of South America, during Octo- 
ber, 1908: A. Nessrig, H. Hansen, C. 
Johansen, R. Lewis, C. Alsager, E. 
Erickson, R. Ross, C. Anderson, S. 
Anderson, W. H. Crane, S. Johnson 
and A. Bosbury. Apply to Manager 
Marine Department, Union Oil Co., 
San Francisco. 

Will any of the crew of the John 

Richard Ryan, who left the British Palmer on the voyage from Aus- 

steamship Candida at San Francisco 'ralia to San Francisco or Pacific 

.,,,.. ■ J e u iu Coast port last year please call on 

m July last, is inquired for by the . -.u t? n -iir i. 

■^ -^ or communicate with F. R. Wall, 

British Consui-General. .324 Merchants' Exchange, San Fran- 

Lott Bartlett Walls, who has been | ^-^^^^ telephone Kearny 394? 

sailing for years between San Fran-'^ 

cisco and China, is inquired for by 
his brother, John M. Walls, 2721 
Thomas street, St. Louis, Mo. 



RAYMOND, WASH. 

THE OLYMPIC CLUB 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, POOL 
and BILLIARDS 

All Daily Papers — Coast 

Seamen's Journal. 

RAYMOND WASHINGTON 

INFORMATION WANTED. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



The new slipway at Manila, situ- 
ated on the New Port Reclamation, 
and fronting on the inner basin of 
the harbor, is expected to be in work- 
ing order by the end of the year. 
The slip will be capable of taking a 
3,000-ton steamer, and haulage will 
be by wire rope. Repair shops are 
to be equipped with up-to-date ma- 
chinery. 

It is stated that Lord Pirrie, chair- 
man of Harland & Wolff, builders of 
the Titanic, has been so impressed 
by the disaster to that vessel that 
he has decided to reconstruct his 
own yacht, the Valiant, on lines sug- 
gested by the foundering of the 
White Star vessel. Meanwhile he 
will not allow the Valiant to be 
used. 

The new naval collier Proteus, 
built at the plant of the Newport 
News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock 
Company for the U. S. Navy, was 
launched September 14. The Proteus 
is the largest naval collier yet built 
for the Government, being 521 ft. 
long, 70 ft. broad and 40 ft. deep. 
She will displace 19,000 tons, and 
will have a carrying capacity of 15,- 
000 tons of coal. 

Members of the General Board of 
the Navy Department said that 
while there is now a shortage of 
5100 enlisted men in the Navy, re- 
cruiting is proceeding so rapidly that 
the maximum complement fixed by 
law at 52,000 will soon be reached. 
The Department is making a vigor- 
ous campaign at all recruiting sta- 
tions to fill up to the quota neces- 
sary by January 1st. 

Plans have been made for convert- 
ing the U. S. collier Vestal into a 
repair ship. The Vestal will be 
equipped with a large coppersmith 
foundry and forge shop and will be 
able to make heavy repairs on the 
ships of the fleet while afloat, and 
thus add much to the efficiency of 
the fleet, as she will have sufficient 
speed to keep up with the fleet and 
be on hand when repairs are needed. 

The Navy Department will soon 
begin experiments with a new device 
to prevent collisions at sea, the in- 
vention of two Liverpool engineers. 
The invention is an electrical sound 
indicator carried at the top of a 
mast. It indicates the direction of 
the noise made by an approaching 
vessel, the sound impinging on sen- 
sitive drums which flash electric 
lights. 

With the purchase of the gunboat 
"Isla de Cuba" from the U. S. Gov- 
ernment for $57,250, Venezuela has 
become possessed of the only effect- 
ive warship in any of the navies 
of countries bordering upon the 
Spanish Main. The "Isla de Cuba" 
is being repaired at the Charleston 
Navy Yard at a cost of $.25,000, to 
be paid by the purchasers and is to 
become the flagship of the Venezue- 
lan Navy. 

Conservation of the whale is to be 
undertaken by the Brazilian Gov- 
ernment, according to advices to the 
State Department from Embassador 
Morgan at Rio de Janeiro. The move 
is of significance to this country, for 
the whaling industry in the South 
Atlantic Ocean is practically con- 
trolled by Americans. Brazil pur- 
poses to maintain patrol stations 
and to establish a zoological museum 
and aquarium in Rio de Janeiro. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




The discovery that goods made in 
Germany and disguised as French 
have been flooding France has 
caused widespread indignation there. 

Paul Margueritte declares that the 
old French family life is doomed 
and suggests easier divorce as a 
remedy for the declining birthrate. 

War against Turkey has been de- 
clared by Bulgaria, Greece. Servia 
and Montenegro. Several bloody en- 
gagements have already taken place 
and the present outlook points to- 
ward a bitter and prolonged struggle. 

The typhoon that swept several 
islands of the Philippine group Oc- 
tober 16 caused many deaths and 
heavy damage to property. Ii is 
estimated that four hundred persons 
were killed and that damage amount- 
ing to $5,000,000 was done in the 
island of Cebu. 

Harold Spender, the great English 
journalist, who is practically the 
mouthpiece of the British Foreign 
Office, declared that the present Eu- 
ropean concert on the Balkans was 
built on mutual fear and could hardly 
avert a general conflagration in the 
Levant. 

The mission which was sent to the 
Sahara to trace the route of the 
future trans-African railway, says 
the Matin, has completed its labors, 
and the passage of the line across 
the desert, which was the chief diffi- 
culty, is now considered to be cer- 
tain of accomplishment. 

After months of diplomatic strife 
for better terms, Turkey surrendered 
on October 15, and the Ottoman and 
Italian plenipotentiaries signed the 
protocol of a peace treaty, which 
ends the war between Italy and 
Turkey, and, incidentally, relieves the 
Ottoman Empire of a crushing handi- 
cap in the forthcoming struggle in 
the Balkans. 

The Japanese public seems a unit 
in calling upon the physician who 
attended the late Emperor to follow 
the example of General Nogi and 
kill himself lest he fall into dishonor. 
The doctor refuses to commit hara- 
kiri, saying the life of the Emperor 
could have been saved had he ab- 
stained from the use of alcoholic 
liquors. 

The imports and exports of France 
during the first eight months of this 
year show a large increase. Tht im- 
ports have increased by 80.000,000 
francs, of which raw materials and 
objects necessary for manufacture 
make up 60,000,000 francs. The ex- 
ports have increased by 80,000,000 
francs, of which nearly 50,000,000 are 
manufactured goods. 

General Felix Diaz, nephew of 
General Porfirio Diaz, the deposed 
President of Mexico, has raised the 
banner of rebellion at Vera Cruz. 
He entered the city with 500 men 
and seized the arsenal and garrison, 
which comprised 500 of the Twenty- 
first Infantry and one six-gun bat- 
tery. Diaz then placed men in 
charge of the two gunboats, Tampico 
and Bravo lying in the harbor. 

The importation of lemons from 
Sicily and other parts of the Med- 
iterranean, as well as other fruits 
from Southern Europe, may be 
checked by the United States Gov- 
ernment, because of the Mediterra- 
nean fly, which is said to infest the 
fruit. The board in the Department 
of Agriculture having charge of the 
enforcement of the Federal Plant 
Quarantine law has instructed the 
Bureau of Entomology to make an 
investigation. 



San Francisco Letter List. 



Letters at the San Francisco Sailors, 
Union OfBce are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mall Is advertised In 
these columns should at once notify 
P. Scharrenberg, Headquarters Sailors' 
Union. San Francisco, to forward same 
to the port of their destination. 



-1772 
-992 
-922 



Apa. J. 

Albrechsen, A. 
Atkinson, S. 
Allen. J. M. 
Aderman, E. 
Anders. F. 
Andorsen -1G20 
Andersen -735 
AndPrsen, S. 
Anderson 
Anderson, 
Anderson. 
Anderson. -822. 
Anderson. A. 
Anderson, A. P. 

i^ahr. F. 
Bakby. Ch. 
Rakker. H. 
Bang, M. 
H.irdsen. J. 
Barton, W. 
Bath. C. 
Bausbaok. K. 
Beck. B. 
Borkor. Ch. 
Becker. M. 
Behng. O. 
Rehr. H'nry 
Heigh, B. 
Beirsen, A. 
Bekker, Ch. 
Bengtson, M. 
Benson. G. 
Berg. J. 
Bergman, L. J. 
Bergen. P. 
Bergsten. R. 
Bergstrom. A. 
Berlin. W. 

Caen, O. 
Cailan, J. 
Caplinger. O. 
Carlsen. C. 
Carlson. J. 
Carlson. -1348 
Carlstrom. G. 
Ceasy, E. 
Chaler, B. 
Christensen, H. 
Chrlstensen, L. P. 

Oahlgren, P. 
Dahlin, G. 
Hanielson, D. 
1 )aragher, J. 
Day, H. 
Davior, W. J. 
DeBaere. H. 
De Bruin, B. 
Dempsey, H. 

Ecken, M. 
Edgerton, J. 
Edlund. K. 
Edolf, Ch. 
Edstrom, J. 
Edwards, D. 
Edwards, J. 
Bhlert, A. 
Ek C 

Ekendahl, W. 
Eliassen. S. 
Farnen, W. 
Faulkner. J 
Finck, J. 
Fischer, P. 
Fisher, T. R. 

Geggus, Ch. 
Gerner, H. 
Gillholm, A. 
Gjardahl S. 
Goana, C. 
Gonzalez, J. 
Gordia. O. 
Goodrlge, M. 

Haktin, B. 
Hailenberg, 
lialvorsen, A. 
Ilannus. A. 
Hannus, M. 
A. H., -le.'iO 
Hansen, Ch. 
Hansen, 
Hansen, 
Hansen, H. O. 
Hansen, H. P. 
Hansen. J. A. J. 
Hansen, J. M. 
Hanson, H. 
Hanssen, -1867. 
Hatter, W. 
Haugen, L. 

Illig, G. 
Illman, T. 
Inberg, J. E. 

Jacobsen, Ole 
Jacobson, J. 
Jahnsen, K. 
Jahnsen, W. 
Jakabson, F. 
JanofT, A. 
Janson, Fr. 
.lensen, C. E. 
Jensen, -2062 
.Jensen, J. 
Jensen, -1614 
Jeppson, P. 
Jersch, W. 
Jespersen, M. 
Johannsen, L. 
Johansen, B. 

Kahlberg, W. 
Kaiklem, O. 
Kaktin, E. 
Kalias, M. 
Kallos, J. 
Karlson, R. 
Karlson. S. 
K.arlsson. E. 
Kelly, Th. 
Korlsson. E. 
Kielman. J. 
KilpM trick, C. 
Kindlund, O. 
Kittilson, -595 
Klahn, Ch. 



E. 



-1786 
H. 



Anderson, Friz 
Anderson, G. 
Anderson, J. A. 
Anderson, K. O. 
Anderson, M. 
Anderson, Oscar 
Anderson. S. P. 
Anderson. V. 
Andersson -1778 
Andersson. L. 
Andreassen, -1136 
Anis. J. 
Arbricks. A. 
Austin, T. 



Bemhardsen, C 
Blanca, F. 
Billington, M. 
BlnKham, T. 
Bjerk, G. 
Bjornstad, M. 
Blachburn, G. 
Black. J. 
Black, V. 
Blikshaven, S. 
Block. W. 
Blomberg, G. 
Borgesen, H. 
Bowers, G. 
Bradley, A. 
Bragge, H. 
Brands, M. 
Brennan. M. 
Brans, S. 
Bredenbach. A. 
Bruce, O. 
Bryde, Ch. 
Bulb, E. 



Christiansen, J. 
Chrlstophersen, F. 
Cliristophersen, R. 
Clausen, J. 
Clever, H. 
Collins. F. 
Connell, H. 
Cotter, J. 
Cranby, J. 
Curtis, R. 

Devany, D. 
Dobbs, W. 
Dobrick. J. 
Dockreil, W. 
Donelly. W. 
Dornquist. O. 
Douglas, K. H. 
Dracar, E. 



Egeland,